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Loyola Marymount University Ranked Among Top Universities in the Nation for Entrepreneurship


Loyola Marymount University Ranked Among Top
Universities in the Nation for Entrepreneurship

The Loyola Marymount University College of Business Administration was ranked 13th among top undergraduate schools for entrepreneurs.

In a survey of more than 700 schools by The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine, LMU achieved the highest ranking of any school on the West Coast, among undergraduate entrepreneurship programs for its success in a multitude of factors.

“This is the highest ranking we have ever had on a national scale,” said Fred Kiesner, Conrad Hilton Chair of Entrepreneurship in the College of Business Administration. “We started out as 31st in the first ranking we achieved in 1998, climbed to 25th, then 19th and now we’re 13th. I am so unbelievably proud of our faculty in entrepreneurship; they do a creative job of teaching real life, action-oriented, entrepreneurship to our students.”

LMU was one of the first schools in the nation to begin formally teaching entrepreneurship in 1972, and today has a concentration in entrepreneurship at both the graduate (MBA) and undergraduate levels. Entrepreneurship education at LMU combines a formal, structured curriculum with the ability to design classroom activities and electives to provide students with the maximum flexibility for creative and innovative entrepreneurial learning, real life, practical experience and implementable entrepreneurial activities, all within the framework of honesty, ethics and social responsibility.

A number of criteria were factored in to evaluate LMU and other colleges and universities, including the entrepreneurial emphasis of the curriculum, mentoring, experiential learning, faculty credentials, and the success of graduating students and alumni. A key consideration in the rankings was demonstrating a commitment to practical, hands-on experiential learning to provide the skills that translate into real-world businesses.

Robert Franek, editorial director of Princeton Review Books, stated that students are looking for “very clear and practical outcomes — not only for what they’re doing in the classroom, but also that their degree will work for them with those same practical-based outcomes once they graduate.”

The results of the survey, along with the analysis, appear in the October issue of Entrepreneur. For more information and a complete listing of the schools, visit www.entrepreneur.com.