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Master Teachers Profiles 2011-2012

Master Teachers Program Description


Tom Klein, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Animation

Biography
Prior to joining the faculty at LMU, Tom Klein worked professionally as an animator for almost ten years, giving him a first-hand knowledge of studio practices.  His most recent research into the ‘hidden films’ of director Shamus Culhane was profiled in a feature article in The New York Times and an LMU promotional video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQelEzP1gKk

Philosophy
The creation of animated films is a rigorously technical and creative act.  The guidance of students in this pursuit must be a balance between these two aspects of the discipline, and Tom's philosophy is to enable both self-discovery and technical proficiency.

Experience
Within the School of Film and Television, instructors are involved in the creative process of young filmmakers through critique and supervision.  Tom feels that it is important to allow for students to struggle, and even to fail in small measure, because we all learn from mistakes, but it is a teacher's responsibility in the oversight of creative productions to limit the scope of those struggles so that it gives way to enlightenment and artistic expression.  Among the issues that students must be guided through is the collaborative nature of filmmaking.  By requiring students in group projects to create production schedules, the students are assigning themselves homework and deadlines that they must meet.  Tom works with the groups to ensure that potential creative tensions are resolved in a constructive team dynamic and that all participants are contributing fairly and fully engaged in the process.  As teams overcome challenges to complete their animation, they find great fulfillment in the product of their shared efforts.  Classroom experiences that begin as exercises in timing and staging ultimately culminate in thesis films that demonstrate performance, emotion and personal triumph.

Klein MT web photo


Jeremy McCallum, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Biography
Jeremy McCallum worked as a research scientist at Unilever Research before earning his PhD from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UCLA. He joined the faculty of LMU in 2005 and currently teaches in the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. He mentors undergraduate students in organic chemistry research.

Philosophy
My role as a teacher is to inspire and foster a love of learning while providing an environment that is conducive to learning. This is accomplished by communicating effectively, engaging and connecting with students, and utilizing an array of resources available to provide an interactive, interesting, and meaningful classroom setting.

Experience
Dr. McCallum’s pedagogical experiences have focused on the environment of learning. Teaching with enthusiasm and encouragement provides his students with a foundation for learning. Group work, analogies, and connections to real world experiences facilitate student understanding and retention. Dr. McCallum believes the integration of teaching and scholarship provides students with a complete and modern education. He integrates his research projects into classroom lectures and uses his laboratory research projects for hands-on learning and practical experiences. He is an instructor for the Life Science Early Awareness Program (LEAP), the living learning community for first-year science majors and focuses on a broad science integrated curriculum. He utilizes a wide variety of technology in the classroom including clickers, online homework and quizzes, and science demonstrations. Dr. McCallum and colleagues in the Physics and Math Departments were recently awarded an NSF grant focused on using technology to measure and improve problem-solving skills across disciplines.

mccallum homepage1


Nina Reich, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communication Studies

Biography
Dr. Reich earned her doctorate at UNC Chapel Hill.  A Carnegie Fellow and Scholar of the International Institute for SOTL Scholars and Mentors (IISSAM), Dr. Reich is a teacher-scholar, whose teaching and scholarship intersect through community-based learning and activism, for just social change.  Widely published, she is writing a book analyzing the femicides in Juárez, Mexico. 

Philosophy
Dr. Reich’s classroom is a space of possibility and transformation.  She is a facilitator, who offers students critically-driven theoretical and practical tools in order for students to meet their personal, academic, and professional goals.  Her classroom is a space for students to take risks, challenge themselves, and make a just difference.

Experience
Dr. Reich practices a pedagogy of possibility, from a grass-roots perspective, focused on transformational learning.  When enacting CBL and activism, pedagogies, both in and outside of the classroom, focus on how CBL courses can move beyond service, and instead, offer critical frameworks for applied learning.  From this model, students choose a social justice issue, and work alongside community members, in solidarity, for just social change.  Student projects are community-driven, and guided by notions of accompaniment in struggle.  Students, however, could serve a population in need, endlessly.  From a pedagogy of possibility, students, instead, ask, what are the underlying systemic issues that give rise to oppression and inequity in the first place.  By working alongside community members, students garner first-hand and sophisticated understandings of the policy issues that require change.  Consequently, in taking a systemic approach to address injustices, CBL projects and large scale social movements have the ability to transform communities.

Nina Reich MT Pic


Todd Shoepe, M.S., Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Health and Human Sciences

Biography
Todd Shoepe grew up in Portland and completed a BS and MS degrees at Oregon State and worked there before moving to LMU in 2005.  Athletics spurred an interest for him in physiological adaptations to exercise in order to understand anecdotal practices in performance training.  Currently,  he is pursuing an Ed.D. in instructional technologies at Pepperdine University. 

Philosophy
Teaching is not making someone learn.  Rather, teachers act as facilitators of whole-person growth by creating and maintaining inspirational learning environments that foster individual curiosity and self-actualization. Referent leadership and mentoring catalyze the assimilation of students into their chosen communities of practice through feedback delivered via modeling and individually appropriate narratives.

Experience
Todd has experience in utilizing virtual classrooms (Adobe Connect, Eluminate, Webex, Skype, Tapped-In), learning management systems (Blackboard, McGraw-Hill Connect, Pearson Coursecompass, Sakai), lecture capture (Echo360, audio and video podcasts, Tegrity), classroom technologies (Doceri, PRS Clickers, iClickers, Powerpoint, multimedia, iTunesU, iPads, digital camera microscopy), virtual dissections, E-books, and facilitating student creative projects such as videos, blogs, websites, books, manuals, songs, games, and wikis.  He is contributor to the development of a number of digital learning products provided by McGraw-Hill including: Learnsmart, Anatomy and Physiology Revealed, and Connect.  Currently, he is investigating the following pedagogical areas: 1) the effectiveness of student-generated anatomy atlases in retention of knowledge and comparative analysis of physiological function, 2) the effects of photographic food journaling with cellphone cameras on nutritional knowledge as assessed through portion size and nutrient estimation, 3) and best practices for online and hybrid learning environments.

MT Todd Shoepe Pic


Brian Treanor, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy

Biography

Brian Treanor received his Ph.D. from Boston College. His teaching and research cover hermeneutics, environmental philosophy, philosophy of religion, and ethics. He is the author or editor of Aspects of Alterity (Fordham, 2006), A Passion for the Possible (Fordham, 2010), Interpreting Nature (Fordham, expected 2012), and Emplotting Virtue (SUNY, expected 2012).

Philosophy
Goethe once observed, “treat people as if they were what they ought to be, and you help them to become what they are capable of being.” I believe that great professors help their students to become their best selves, and that doing so requires a careful balance of challenge, encouragement, mentoring, and modeling.

Experience
My classes tend to be focused on the close reading of primary texts and lively discussions of the ideas therein. I require my students to read both charitably and critically—the former so that they make a genuine attempt to see what a given philosopher thinks in the best possible light, and the latter so that they consider whether or not it is true or good. In my classes, philosophy is never simply about mastering what a given thinker said—although a careful understanding of the position in question is a prerequisite for anything further—but also about considering how various philosophical insights are relevant in the contemporary lives of my students.

Treanor MT photo