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Teaching with Technology Day 2013

Teaching with Technology Day [Event Flyer]
Organized by: Center for Teaching Excellence – Academic Technology Team

As seating is limited for Dr. Bowen’s luncheon address, pre-registration is required.
Please RSVP HERE or email teachers@lmu.edu by January 15, 2013.

Printed Program 

TWT Program printed

Videos: 

Using Web Conferencing To Make Online Courses Come ALIVE! - Crista Copp & Dave Scozzaro
Polling Students and Solving Stats Problems - Andrew Healy
Web Conferencing - Bob Hurteau
Micro-Documentaries: Looking, experiencing, reflecting, & understanding - Ernesto Colin
"Conversations in the Cloud"... How VoiceThread can Improve Learning and Student Engagement - Michael Kieley
#TeachingWithTwitter: Trending, teaching, and tweeting to generate discussion - Beth Brewer
Technology and Assessment: Using MyLMU Connect and Online Rubrics to Focus on Learning Outcomes - Janna Goebel
Marketing Research - EASY to do badly, NOT so easy to do well, even with "Hi-tech aids" - Alan Hogenauer
Video Games and Critical Thinking - Sue Scheibler
Problem-solving Examples with Narration for Students (PENS)- Jeff Phillips
Less Face to Face but More Human: Using VoiceThread to Create Personal Digital Histories - Philip Molebash
Using Mobile Devices for Acquisition and Display - Art Nomura
Une Simulation Globale: Belleville-sur-Mer - Veronique Flambard-Weisbart
Virtual Environments & Undergraduate Education: Lessons Learned & Future Directions - Stephanie August & Michele Hammers
Developing iPhone apps to Support Student Learning - Stephanie August & Todd Shoepe
Teaching Writing with WordPress - Evelyn McDonnell

Keynote Address:

Bowen, Jose Antonio, Southern Methodist University
Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology out of your College Classroom will Improve Student Learning
Technology is changing higher education, but the greatest value of a physical university will remain its face-to-face (naked) interaction between faculty and students. The most important benefits to using technology occur outside of the classroom. New technology can increase student preparation and engagement between classes and create more time for the in-class dialogue that makes the campus experience worth the extra money it will always cost to deliver. Students already use online content, but need better ways to interact with material before every class by taking online quizzes, doing interactive online assignments, playing games, asking questions or working in online communities. By rethinking our assignments, use of technology and course design, we can create more class time for the activities and interactions that most spark the critical thinking and change of mental models we seek.

Sessions:

August, Stephanie - Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Virtual Environments & Undergraduate Education: Lessons Learned & Future Directions (with Michele Hammers)
Delivering course content through multiple user virtual environments (MUVEs) has the potential to help us engage student interest and appeal to different learning styles. However, fully maximizing the multi-modal potential of MUVE learning environments may require a re-imagining not only of the pedagogical methods being used but of the content itself. In addition to increased attention to the many aesthetic dimensions (e.g., visual richness, narrative coherence) that MUVEs call into play, educators contemplating the use of MUVEs need to consider a variety of substantive and technical questions as part of their design and development process. They also need to consider how we as teachers facilitate collaborative learning in the hybrid classroom, how to partner across disciplines to produce interesting and effective experiences for students, and the effect of platform selection on dissemination. Drawing on assessment data gathered during a three year NSF-funded grant project (“VESLL”) , Drs. August and Hammers will discuss some of the key lessons they learned about the aesthetics, technicalities, and substantive issues surrounding the virtual delivery of course content, and raise questions about sustainability.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

August, Stephanie - Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Developing iPhone apps to Support Student Learning (with Todd Shoepe)
iEnergy™ is a free iPhone application created through the 2011 LMU Academic Technology grant to support nutrition education. The application facilitates both nutritive and portion-size education in a real-time, individualized context. Users journal food intakes throughout the day by capturing images with their phones which are uploaded along with additional textual information to a remote database. Instructors and research assistants can then access these entries via a web portal to complete nutrient analyses which are then relayed back to the user. The iEnergy™ application has the potential to increase the accuracy of dietary analysis by reducing the reliance of participant memory and inexperience with portion sizes.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.


Brewer, Elizabeth - Specialized Programs in Urban Education
#TeachingWithTwitter: Trending, teaching, and tweeting to generate discussion
Although used widely for socialization and productivity, educational social media use often falls flat in the classroom. Twitter, a social networking and micro-blogging tool, is one of the easiest to introduce and use with students across content areas and specializations. Learn about its functionality, features, and classroom uses as we discuss how this tool improves and sustains course discussions.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Colin, Ernesto - Specialized Programs in Urban Education
Micro-Documentaries: Looking, experiencing, reflecting, & understanding
Within the realm of digital storytelling is the documentary film. With increasing access to user friendly filming and editing tools, new generations of students can use visual mediums for research and reflection. This session will showcase excerpts of student-created ethnographic micro-documentary films from teacher education courses at LMU. In addition, the session will report findings from a 2012 study of alumni of the courses that evaluated the impact of the assignment for professional practice and transformational learning.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Copp, Crista - Information Technology Services
Using Web Conferencing To Make Online Courses Come ALIVE! (with Dave Scozzaro)
Want to teach online? Worried about the loss of 'personalization' by doing so? Come see how using Web Conferencing tools such as WebEx can facilitate creating a community that is every bit as close and engaged as your classroom.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Eusufzai, Zaki - Economics
Interactive Visualization in Quantitative Courses through a “Lab” Component
Purely quantitative courses can be daunting for those students who are visual learners. In this project I exhibit interactive visual tools that can be used to enhance student learning. While these tools were developed for an Introductory Statistics course, they can be used in any course where numbers are extensively used.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Flambard-Weisbart, Veronique - Modern Languages and Literature
Une Simulation Globale: Belleville-sur-Mer
In this global simulation, students pretend two things: they live somewhere else and are someone else. They live in the Loyola Marymount Virtual University (LMVU) island in Second Life, Belleville-sur-mer. Belleville-sur-mer and the avatars who live there with their local customs, allow students to have authentic interaction in French language and with francophone cultures. Students each create their own French / francophone avatar for whom they choose a name, an identity, and an occupation as dwellers on the island. They describe their avatars in a blog, and in compositions that are read by the rest of the class. Very quickly, a sense of community is born, and interactions on the island become very lively as ideas for the students / avatars to write about are developed: invitations are made, encounters take place, incidents occur on the island and major events in Belleville-sur-mer affect avatars' lives. All this will be a pretext to practice different forms of writing, through individual compositions, and a collaborative detective mini-novel.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Goebel, Janna - English
Technology and Assessment: Using MyLMU Connect and Online Rubrics to Focus on Learning Outcomes
This presentation will highlight ways to make assessment transparent to students through the online reinforcement of course goals. By crafting rubrics based on learning outcomes and including the criteria in daily instruction through MyLMU Connect, instructors can prepare students to approach coursework with a clear understanding of the purpose of each assignment as it relates to the course expectations.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Hammers, Michele - Communication Studies
Virtual Environments & Undergraduate Education: Lessons Learned & Future Directions (with Stephanie August)
Delivering course content through multiple user virtual environments (MUVEs) has the potential to help us engage student interest and appeal to different learning styles. However, fully maximizing the multi-modal potential of MUVE learning environments may require a re-imagining not only of the pedagogical methods being used but of the content itself. In addition to increased attention to the many aesthetic dimensions (e.g., visual richness, narrative coherence) that MUVEs call into play, educators contemplating the use of MUVEs need to consider a variety of substantive and technical questions as part of their design and development process. They also need to consider how we as teachers facilitate collaborative learning in the hybrid classroom, how to partner across disciplines to produce interesting and effective experiences for students, and the effect of platform selection on dissemination. Drawing on assessment data gathered during a three year NSF-funded grant project (“VESLL”) , Drs. August and Hammers will discuss some of the key lessons they learned about the aesthetics, technicalities, and substantive issues surrounding the virtual delivery of course content, and raise questions about sustainability.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Healy, Andrew - Economics
Polling Students and Solving Stats Problems
In intro statistics, clickers have been particularly useful. Clickers can be used to collect data from students and then to test students on problems using those data.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Hogenauer, Alan - Marketing and Business Law
Marketing Research - EASY to do badly, NOT so easy to do well, even with "Hi-tech aids"
Dr. Hogenauer will discuss the individual marketing survey assignment that forms the central element of his Marketing Analysis class in the College of Business Administration. Qualtrics – and similar hi-tech innovations – certainly help in terms of questionnaire distribution, data processing, data analysis, and graphical presentation, but they do NOT overcome the deficiencies inherent in all-too-many survey applications.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Huchting, Karie - Educational Leadership
A Flipped Classroom: Using Technology to Provide Direct Instruction
For a graduate level Quantitative Research Methods and Statistics course, all lectures were pre-recorded with voiceover narration. Power point lecture slides with audio were posted online on MY LMU Connect for the entire semester. Students were expected to review the lectures during their own time (e.g., for homework) and prior to class. In a flipped course design, class time was then spent on activities and hands-on practice. My experience and student reactions about the flipped course design will be shared.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Hurteau, Bob - LMU Extension
Abstract TBD
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Kieley, Michael - Art and Art History
Try "conversations in the cloud"... How VoiceThread can Improve Learning and Student Engagement.
What is VoiceThread? It's an asynchronous technology that allows one to post images, ask questions, and have students respond with audio, text, and webcam comments on what they are seeing. I will give examples of how I have been using VoiceThread to enhance project-based learning in an art + innovation class called, "Visual Thinking." And I will discuss some ideas about how VoiceThread can be used in teaching any subject that has visual content.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Leon, Linda - Finance and Computer Information Systems
The Impact of Visual Modeling Software on Student Learning Associated with Messy Business Applications
Students’ abilities to create an appropriate influence diagram and spreadsheet model for a messy business application were assessed by comparing student output quality and feedback for two different pedagogical approaches, the traditional whiteboard brainstorming approach and the integration of Microsoft Visio, a 2D drawing package. While a significant difference in student performance was not observed, students did document different benefits and drawbacks of the two approaches. Depending upon a student’s learning style, some students see more benefits from creating a quick, sketchy diagram before jumping into mathematical relationships, while others find it helpful to invest time in developing a detailed and polished diagram.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

McCallum, Jeremy - Chemistry and Biochemistry
Flipping Classroom Learning: Creating Pre-Lecture Videos using the Doceri app for the iPad
In this presentation, I will share my experiences with incorporating technology to create think-aloud videos to flip classroom learning. I will discuss and demonstrate the Doceri app and how I use this iPad app to create pre-lecture videos to flip classroom learning.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

McDonnell, Evelyn - English
Teaching Writing With WordPress
WordPress is a free online blogging tool that can be adapted for all sorts of classroom uses. This presentation will specifically focus on how to use WP as a real-world online writing workshop. I will show how to set up accounts and create a blog for classroom use. I will make some specific suggestions regarding privacy, security, using multimedia, and creating blogrolls. While I use WP for journalism classes, much of what I will show could be applied to any writing class, or most coursework in general.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Mellor, Blake - Mathematics
Flipping Precalculus
I will report on my experience with flipping a Precalculus class by posting lecture notes online. I will discuss the structure of the class, responses to student surveys, and measures of student achievement. I will also discuss how I hope to address some of the problems with the class in the next iteration.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Mills, Michael - Psychology
Using Echo360 Lecture Recordings, Wikis, and Video Conferencing in an Online Course.
This presentation will review the tools that I have used for the development and deployment of an online course that I have taught the previous two summer sessions. Lecture recordings from a traditional classroom course, captured via the LMU classroom Echo360 system, were indexed and placed online. Weekly assignments during the summer session allowed students to view the recorded online lectures at their own pace each week of the class. I will also share how I used other online tools in the course, including a wiki for student term papers and a free video online conferencing system for real-time, synchronous video interaction.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Molebash, Philip - Specialized Programs in Urban Education
Less Face to Face but More Human: Using VoiceThread to Create Personal Digital Histories
Because we see students less when we teach online, many conclude that online or hybrid learning is less human than the traditional face-to-face model. However, even in face-to-face classes where collaboration and conversation is valued, at most we hear an individual student's voice only seconds per week. Many Web 2.0 technologies provide opportunities for students' voices to be heard in more meaningful ways. This session will show how VoiceThread was used as a tool for students to design and develop personal digital histories. These products have proven to be catalysts in expanding students' voices in class, thereby humanizing the class.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Mosteig, Edward - Mathematics
Using Computer Software to Increase Understanding of Probability and Statistics (with Thomas Zachariah)
Probability and Statistics are subjects of great importance to contemporary society. People encounter a variety of data in everyday life and in numerous careers in the natural, theoretical and social sciences. It is not feasible to analyze such real-world data by hand, and so technology has become an indispensable tool for the modern research scientist. It is therefore important that students of probability and statistics be introduced to various mathematical and statistical software systems to create an environment that helps them understand the foundations of probability theory and statistical inference. This naturally leads us to consider the integration of computer software into our undergraduate curriculum in order to engage students and promote the investigation and analysis of real-world data. In particular, we pose the following question: Can the integration of technology in the classroom not only improve the computational proficiency of our students, but also deepen their conceptual understanding and appreciation of probability and statistics?
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.

Nomura, Art - Production Film and Television
Using Mobile Devices for Acquisition and Display
Effectively acquiring and displaying media with mobile devices benefits from a basic understanding of their limitations and advantages. Art Nomura will discuss and illustrate these parameters by sharing short form student work from his 'Media Innovation' course.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Phillips, Jeff - Physics
Problem-solving Examples with Narration for Students (PENS)
Using Livescribe smartpens, students in physics, chemistry, mathematics and teacher prep courses record, and analyze, think-alouds. These recordings help the students to improve their problem- solving skills, particularly self-regulation.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 1:10 - 1:50 pm

Przasnyski, Zbigniew - Finance and Computer Information Systems
Classroom Technology Bag of Tricks (with Kala Seal)
Ever looking to tackle a specific classroom issue? Come listen to how two professors use tools such as Wacom Tablets, PollAnywhere, TeamViewer, NetSupport, and more to aid in creating the right classroom environment. Each tool discussed will address a different classroom need.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Sabatino, Anthony - Educational Leadership
Hybridizing the Classroom: Lessons Learned from a Digital Immigrant.
The session will focus on the initial strategies used in turning a course that only utilizes face-to-face instructional strategies into a hybrid/blended format. The first step is to overcome your own bias, fears, and unwillingness to change. Second, is to understand the four methods of course content delivery and how they become integrated to maximize the learning environment in the hybrid classroom.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Scheibler, Susan - Film/TV Studies
Video Games and Critical Thinking
How have video games changed the way students learn? How can we tap into the power and possibility of games to prompt critical thinking in our students? This presentation explores these questions.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Scozzaro, David - Information Technology Services
Using Web Conferencing To Make Online Courses Come ALIVE! (with Crista Copp)
Want to teach online? Worried about the loss of 'personalization' by doing so? Come see how using Web Conferencing tools such as WebEx can facilitate creating a community that is every bit as close and engaged as your classroom.
Session 2, Marymount Center (UNH 3002), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Seal, Kala - Finance and Computer Information Systems
Classroom Technology Bag of Tricks (with Zbigniew Przasnyski)
Ever looking to tackle a specific classroom issue? Come listen to how two professors use tools such as Wacom Tablets, PollAnywhere, TeamViewer, NetSupport, and more to aid in creating the right classroom environment. Each tool discussed will address a different classroom need.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Sharbaf, Mehrdad - Finance and Computer Information Systems
Doceri
Doceri is a tool for presentations and lessons. Based on my personal experience using Doceri, I demonstrate to use it as a whiteboard, and I show you how to create any handwritten/drawn content on any background of your choice before you record, or record live during your presentation.I also show you how to use the Doceri Remote iPad app and Doceri Desktop software, you can control a computer (Mac or Windows), easily launch any document or application, and annotate over them at any time.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Shoepe, Todd - Health and Human Sciences
Developing iPhone apps to Support Student Learning (with Stephanie August)
iEnergy™ is a free iPhone application created through the 2011 LMU Academic Technology grant to support nutrition education. The application facilitates both nutritive and portion-size education in a real-time, individualized context. Users journal food intakes throughout the day by capturing images with their phones which are uploaded along with additional textual information to a remote database. Instructors and research assistants can then access these entries via a web portal to complete nutrient analyses which are then relayed back to the user. The iEnergy™ application has the potential to increase the accuracy of dietary analysis by reducing the reliance of participant memory and inexperience with portion sizes.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Shoepe, Todd - Health and Human Sciences
Student Learning with Smart Phones
Mobile smart phones are in the pockets of just about every one of our students around the clock. Why not utilize this preferred device to the benefit our instruction? This session will describe multiple ways that mobile technologies can be leveraged so that students can receive content, collaborate with peers, complete homework, and engage while in class. Podcasts, file sharing, web‐clickers, video conferencing, social networking will all be reviewed briefly.
Session 1, CTE (UNH 3030), 2:00 - 2:40 pm.

Vance, Charles - Management
Using Pre-Recorded Lectures for Enhanced Teaching Flexibility and Impact
The use of pre-recorded lectures can enhance both flexibility and learning impact in your teaching, regardless of your course or subject matter. Experiences will be briefly shared in which pre-recorded lectures were effectively used in (1) providing distance instruction, (2) utilizing a virtual guest speaker from Germany, and (3) in providing an effective use of class time (at the first class meeting!) when the instructor was away for a professional conference.
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 2:50 - 3:30 pm.

Zachariah, Thomas - Mathematics
Using Computer Software to Increase Understanding of Probability and Statistics (with Edward Mosteig)
Probability and Statistics are subjects of great importance to contemporary society. People encounter a variety of data in everyday life and in numerous careers in the natural, theoretical and social sciences. It is not feasible to analyze such real-world data by hand, and so technology has become an indispensable tool for the modern research scientist. It is therefore important that students of probability and statistics be introduced to various mathematical and statistical software systems to create an environment that helps them understand the foundations of probability theory and statistical inference. This naturally leads us to consider the integration of computer software into our undergraduate curriculum in order to engage students and promote the investigation and analysis of real-world data. In particular, we pose the following question: Can the integration of technology in the classroom not only improve the computational proficiency of our students, but also deepen their conceptual understanding and appreciation of probability and statistics?
Session 3, eClassroom (UNH 3212), 1:10 - 1:50 pm.