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Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW)

Spring 2012

January 20, 2012, 2:00 – 3:30pm, CTE - UNH 3030
Words vs. Numbers: Dealing with Qualitative Data
Jackie Dewar, Ph.D., Mathematics
This workshop will begin with a brief discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data as evidence in scholarly studies of student learning. Two approaches to analyzing (coding) qualitative data will be presented and participants will engage in coding a data set during the workshop. Concepts such as inter-rater reliability and predetermined and emergent categories will be described in simple terms. The goal is for participants to leave with basic knowledge, accessible resources, and increased confidence in their ability to draw and justify conclusions from qualitative data.

February 17, 2012, 2:00 – 3:30pm, BCLA eClassroom UNH 3212
Statistics as Principled Argument II: More Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
David Hardy, Ph.D., Psychology
This workshop will provide instruction on database management, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics (hypothesis testing). We will be using SPSS, a popular statistical software program. Instruction on SPSS will be integrated with an overarching conceptual theme that statistics can help you make (or criticize) more strongly an argument. Descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency and variability will be briefly covered. Inferential statistics will also be introduced, where hypotheses can be tested and arguments can be made (or not!). Academic performance in LMU students will be examined to illustrate these procedures and rhetorical strategies. Handouts will be provided along with demonstration exercises.

March 16, 2012, 2:00 – 3:30pm, BCLA eClassroom UNH 3212
Introduction to Statistical Tests
Andrew Healy, Ph.D., Economics
We will discuss how to conduct a range of simple statistical tests. We will start by considering the methods needed to compare means from different samples. Methods that will be covered include Fisher´s exact tests, t-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, and rank-sum tests. We will also demonstrate how computer software can be used to conduct these tests. If time permits, we will cover linear regression, as well.

April 13, 2012, 2:00 – 3:30pm, BCLA eClassroom UNH 3212
Nonparametric Data Analysis
David Hardy, Ph.D., Psychology

This workshop will focus on ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, and MANOVAs, as well as on writing up summary statistics. Bring your own data set and ask questions. 

Fall 2011

September 23, 2011, 2:00 – 3:30pm, CTE UNH 3030
Step-by-Step Survey Design: A Practical Guide to Designing Your Survey
Christine Chavez, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation
Thinking of conducting a survey? With careful planning and well-crafted design, a survey can be a powerful and insightful tool. But how do you get started? This workshop will introduce you to the basic steps of designing a survey. You will also learn about survey ethics and the Institutional Review Board, survey resources available at LMU, and be given a brief introduction to Qualtrics, LMU’s online survey solution.

October 7, 2011, 2:00 – 3:30pm, BCLA eClassroom UNH 3212
Introduction to Sampling and Hypothesis Testing
Andrew Healy, Ph.D., Economics
In this class, we will discuss simple ways of describing and summarizing data. We will start by going over the most basic ways of capturing what data can tell us: histograms, means, and standard deviations. After these methods, we will discuss the ideas of using samples to understand populations, along with how to use samples in any field to test hypotheses. For example, in economics, we might want to use a sample of households to determine whether it was generally true that losing a job causes people to be more likely to divorce. Hypothesis testing methods enable us to determine both an answer to this question and an estimate of how certain we are of that answer.

November 4, 2011, 2:00 – 3:30pm, William H. Hannon Library RM 118
Using Excel to Manage and Make Sense of Evidence of Student Learning
Christine Chavez, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation
You’ve collected the evidence of student learning. What’s next? In Excel for Assessment 101 you’ll learn how to transform scored rubrics, completed surveys, exam responses, and more, into meaningful assessment data. We will guide you through the basics of using Microsoft Excel for data management and analysis, and give you the opportunity to work hands-on with sample data.

December 2, 2011, 3:00 - 4:30pm, location UHN 2416
Statistics as Principled Argument: An Introduction to Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
David Hardy, Ph.D., Psychology
This workshop will provide introductory instruction on database management, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics (hypothesis testing). We will be using SPSS, a popular statistical software program.  Instruction on SPSS will be integrated with an overarching conceptual theme that statistics can help you make (or criticize) more strongly an argument. The simplest argument is to merely describe a set of data in answer to a question. For example, how much time do students at LMU spend on studying? Basic descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency and variability will be covered. Time permitting, inferential statistics will also be introduced, where more complex and interesting arguments can be made and a hypothesis tested. For example, you want to test the (perhaps commonsensical) hypothesis that time spent studying is associated with college grade point average (an answer is provided at the workshop!). The strength of your results and argument will also be discussed. Handouts will be provided along with demonstration exercises.
 

Planned Workshops:

Using Excel to do Statistical Testing
Qualitative Data Analysis

Topic suggestions are welcome, and so are volunteer contributors: teachers@lmu.edu