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Spring 2014

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

Semesters: [Fall 2014]    [Spring 2014]    [Fall 2013]    [Spring 2013]    [Fall 2012]    [Spring 2012]    [Fall 2011]

Date Event Speaker(s)/Presenter(s)
12/13/13  Part-Time Faculty Orientation Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
1/11/14  Part-Time Faculty Orientation  Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
1/17/14
Teaching after the Second Great Digital Storm
Bryan Alexander, Senior Fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education
1/17/14
Teaching with Technology Day   
2/5/14
Statistics Education for Teachers: Project-SET Professional Development Project Stephanie Casey, Eastern Michigan University
2/11/14
Writing Meaningful Student Learning Outcomes Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment
2/12/14
Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate: Crafting Assignments that Work Tom Klein, MFA, Animation
Kirstin Noreen, PhD, Art & Art History
Rachel Washburn, PhD, Sociology
2/19/14  Decoding the Disciplines  Joan Middendorf, PhD, Indiana University Bloomington 
2/19/14  Decoding Writing  Joan Middendorf, PhD, Indiana University Bloomington
2/26/14 Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate: Rhetorical Arts Get-Together
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
Jeffrey Siker, PhD, Administrative Director of the Core, Theological Studies
Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, English
Aimee Ross-Kilroy, PhD, English
3/10/14 The Gender Gap in STEM: Progress and Challenges Between 1971-2011 (CREATE-STEM)
Linda Sax, University of California, Los Angeles
3/11/14 Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People to Fill Out Your Survey
Christine Chavez, MA, Associate Director of Survey Research
3/13/14 Understanding APRC Process: What You Should Know when Submitting Proposals for New and Modified Programs
Academic Planning and Review Committee
3/19/14 Helping Students Learn Discipline-Specific Ways of Thinking and Practicing: Examples from Across the Disciplines John David Dionisio, PhD, Computer Science
Elizabeth Drummond, PhD, History
Rachel Washburn, PhD, Sociology
3/25/14  Focusing on LMU's Undergraduate Learning Outcomes: Creative & Critical Thinking and Oral Communication Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment
3/27/14 LearnSmart™,  A Textbook-Bundled, Metacognitive Study Tool — Is it Really as Good As it Seems? Nicole Bouvier-Brown, PhD, Chemistry & Biochemistry
Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology
3/28/14 Sharing Teaching and Experiences: Conclusion of the Open Classrooms Weeks Spring 2014

4/1/14  The Creative Mind: Using Cognitive Science to Improve Understanding and Pedagogy of the Arts   Deborah Rifkin, PhD, Associate Professor of Music Theory, Ithaca College 
4/3/14  Debriefing FYS - Evaluating the Fall '13 FYS Faculty Experience
4/10/14  Teaching First-Year Students: Introducing Students to Academic Life and Expectations at College Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
Shelby Schaefer, MA, University Advisor
Andrew (A.J.) Ogilvie, MA, University Advisor
4/15/14  Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate: Creating Assignments Outside the Box
4/21/14  Advanced Analytics at DIRECTV - Stats, Big Data, SAS and Data Scientists (CREATE-STEM)
Dan Cho, MBA, Director of Big Data and Advanced Analytics at Direct TV
4/24/14  What is Rigor? Expectations across LMU and Beyond
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
5/13/14
Core Course Design
 
5/13/14
Core Course Design
 
5/14/14
Engaged Learning
 
5/14/14
Designing an Effective and Innovative Interdisciplinary Course Barbara Tewksbury, PhD, Hamilton College
5/15/14 Designing an Effective and Innovative Interdisciplinary Course Barbara Tewksbury, PhD, Hamilton College
5/15/14 Practical and Effective Inquiry-based Teaching Strategies for Engaging Students Barbara Tewksbury, PhD, Hamilton College
5/16/14 Integrating Information Literacy into Your Classes Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
Susan Gardner, MS, William H. Hannon Library
Elisa Slater Acosta, MS, William H. Hannon Library
Other LMU Faculty
5/19/14 Leading with Reading: Strategic Instruction to Deepen Students’ Understanding of Complex Texts Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/19/14 Arguing Across the Curriculum Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/20/14 Text and Context: Helping Students Develop a Rhetorical Awareness of Audience, Purpose, and Genre Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/20/14 Developing Reading and Writing Assignments for Your Classes Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/21/14 Sequencing and Scaffolding Writing and Speaking Assignments Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/21/14 Developing Reading and Speaking Assignments for Your Classes Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT


Part-Time Faculty Orientation 
Friday, December 13, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as

  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):
  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • LMU Bookstore
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning. Lunch will be provided.
Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Alternative Date:
Saturday, January 11, 2014

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3]


Part-Time Faculty Orientation 
Saturday, January 11, 2014 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):
  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • LMU Bookstore
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning. Lunch will be provided.
Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Alternative Date:
Friday, December 13, 2013

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar. 


Teaching after the Second Great Digital Storm
Friday, January 17, 2014 from 12:00pm to 1:15pm in McIntosh (UNH 3999)

Presented By: Bryan Alexander, Senior Fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE)

How has teaching changed after two generations of digital revolutions?  We explore the state of the art, examining classroom uses and trends, looking for practical and accessible strategies.  We conclude with a survey of emerging trends.

Bryan Alexander is senior fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE). He researches, writes, and speaks about emerging trends in the integration of inquiry, pedagogy, and technology and their potential application to liberal arts contexts. Dr. Alexander’s current research interests include emerging pedagogical forms enabled by mobile technologies, learning processes and outcomes associated with immersive environments (as in gaming and augmented reality), the rise of digital humanities, the transformation of scholarly communication, digital storytelling, and futurist methodologies.

Dr. Alexander is author of Future Trends in Technology and Education, a monthly report that surveys recent developments in how education is changing, primarily under the impact of digital technologies. Dr. Alexander is also the author of The New Digital Storytelling: Creating Narratives with New Media, published in April 2011 by Praeger. He tweets steadily at @BryanAlexander.

Dr. Alexander earned his Ph.D. in English from the University of Michigan in 1997, completing a dissertation on Romantic-era Gothic literature. He taught English literature, writing, information literacy, and information technology studies at Centenary College of Louisiana from 1997 through 2002. He was a 2004 fellow of the Frye Leadership Institute.

This presentation is the keynote address for the Teaching with Technology Day 2014 that has been jointly organized by the Center for Teaching Excellence and Information Technology Services.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Teaching with Technology Day
Friday, January 17, 2014, from 12:00 PM to 4:30 PM

Teaching with Technology 2014

Please join us and be inspired by exploring the technology you can use in your classrooms. Come hear from other LMU faculty about the best practices to integrate technology into our classes and learn what had worked successfully in the past.

Keynote Address: Bryan Alexander, Senior Fellow at the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) - "Teaching after the Second Great Digital Storm"

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Statistics Education for Teachers: Project-SET Professional Development Project (CREATE-STEM)
Wednesday, February 5, 2014, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Stephanie Casey, Eastern Michigan University

The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M) include much more statistics content than previous standards, especially at the middle and secondary school levels. Their adoption by California and 44 other states has created the opportunity and necessity for nearly all secondary mathematics teachers to be prepared to teach a substantial amount of statistics. This talk will present professional development materials for teachers that use learning trajectories as their focus for preparing teachers to teach two fundamental topics in statistics, sampling variability and linear regression. Examples of the materials will be given and results from a pilot study of the materials will be discussed.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This talk is part of the Collaborative Research in Education, Assessment, and Teaching Environments for the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar. 
Writing Meaningful Student Learning Outcomes
Tuesday, February 11, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment

Whether you are considering revising your current student learning outcomes or are writing them for the first time, this workshop is for you!

This workshop will provide a simple three-step guide for writing student learning outcomes, share helpful hints, and discuss the benefits of learning outcomes for faculty and students. Participants will be able to try out these techniques by writing their own learning outcomes.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or Ext. 82628.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate: Crafting Assignments that Work
Wednesday, February 12, 2014, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Contributors:
Jodi Finkel, PhD, Political Science
Thomas Klein, MFA, Animation
Kirstin Noreen, PhD, Art & Art History
Rachel Washburn, PhD, Sociology

During this informal gathering, we will focus on how to craft assignments that are not only clear but that also direct students to engage in independent thinking and creativity. 
Three colleagues from different disciplines will kick off our conversations with short presentations on successful assignments they have developed and on how the assignments have evolved over time. We encourage faculty to bring their own assignments and thoughts on what has worked well and areas of particular challenge. 
During our discussions, we plan to place particular emphasis on how to provide appropriate guidance to students and how to make expectations clear. Handouts will be available on “best practices” for developing assignments as will a list of resources on the topic.

This gathering is part of Rachel Washburn’s CTE Faculty Associate Project on Engaging Students in Disciplinary Ways of Knowing and Practicing.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Resources:

Decoding the Disciplines
Wednesday, February 19, 2014, from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

Event Flyer

Presented By: Joan Middendorf, PhD, Indiana University

 A shift is taking place in higher education so that teaching is approached not only from content and from teaching methods, but also from the mental operations that are crucial to functioning in a discipline. Decoding the Disciplines (Pace and Middendorf, 2004) is a pedagogical theory used to overcome bottlenecks to learning. Besides providing a framework for analyzing the reasons for students “stuckness”, the model employs a systematic scaffolding to lead students through the bottleneck. In this session, faculty will ‘decode” the tacit knowledge of experts, the disciplinary assumptions and mental tasks in their field in order to make them available to students. Participants will view videotapes of and conduct Decoding interviews, develop modeling metaphors, and discuss possible applications to their own teaching.

Joan Middendorf serves as Lead Consultant at the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning and Adjunct Professor in Educational Leadership at Indiana University Bloomington. Along with David Pace, she developed the Decoding the Disciplines method for helping students learn disciplinary thinking. Diaz and Shopkow joined them to apply it to the discipline of history; the four have published widely and led faculty workshops around the world in many disciplines. As a Co-Director of the History Learning Project, she received the 2008 Robert Menges Research Award from the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education and the 2009 McGraw-Hill – Magna Publications Outstanding Scholarly Work on Teaching and Learning Award. When not working on her urban farmstead, Joan likes to kayak, hike, and practice T’ai Chi.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Additional workshop offered by Dr. Middendorf: Decoding Writing

This presentation is part of Rachel Washburn's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Engaging Students in Disciplinary Ways of Knowing and Practicing.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Decoding Writing
Wednesday, February 19, 2014, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Joan Middendorf, PhD, Indiana University Bloomington

What are the deep differences between writing in geology, history, journalism, or any other field? In this session participants will analyze student mistakes in order to spell out the unconscious competence of discipline specific writing skills. Instructors may wish to bring three samples of their students’ writing (exemplary, adequate, and inadequate) for their own perusal. Working in cross-disciplinary teams they will uncover assumptions and mental tasks that undergird competent writing in their field and develop writing-specific assessments.  

Joan Middendorf serves as Lead Consultant at the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning and Adjunct Professor in Educational Leadership at Indiana University Bloomington. Along with David Pace, she developed the Decoding the Disciplines method for helping students learn disciplinary thinking. Diaz and Shopkow joined them to apply it to the discipline of history; the four have published widely and led faculty workshops around the world in many disciplines. As a Co-Director of the History Learning Project, she received the 2008 Robert Menges Research Award from the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education and the 2009 McGraw-Hill – Magna Publications Outstanding Scholarly Work on Teaching and Learning Award. When not working on her urban farmstead, Joan likes to kayak, hike, and practice T’ai Chi.

Additional workshop offered by Dr. Middendorf: Decoding the Disciplines

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This presentation is part of Rachel Washburn's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Engaging Students in Disciplinary Ways of Knowing and Practicing

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar. 

Resources:
Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate: Rhetorical Arts Get-Together
Wednesday, February 26, 2014, at 4:15 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Collaborators:
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
Jeffrey Siker, PhD, Administrative Director of the Core, Theological Studies
Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, English
Aimee Ross-Kilroy, PhD, English

This WCC Get-Together is designed for Rhetorical Arts instructors teaching in the spring of 2014.

Please direct all questions to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

The Gender Gap in STEM: Progress and Challenges Between 1971-2011 (CREATE-STEM)
Monday, March 10, 2014, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Linda Sax, University of California, Los Angeles

The underrepresentation of women and girls in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) has received heightened attention in recent years given national concerns about shortages of trained workers in STEM.  This presentation focuses on women’s interest in STEM majors at the point of college entry, and focuses on aspects of this issue that are not well-understood: How does the gender gap in STEM vary across different STEM fields such as engineering, computer science and biological sciences?  How has the gender gap in STEM changed over the past 40 years?  The presentation then focuses specifically on the field of computer science, asking how women in CS majors changed over the past four decades in terms of their abilities, interests and demographic backgrounds? A better understanding of the evolution of women in CS and other STEM fields can help to improve efforts at recruitment and retention of women in STEM.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This talk is part of the Collaborative Research in Education, Assessment, and Teaching Environments for the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People To Fill Out Your Survey
Tuesday, March 11, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Christine Chavez, MA, Associate Director of Survey Research

Are you struggling to get more people to fill out your surveys? Many factors can influence a person’s decision to participate in a survey, but with careful consideration you can develop an effective strategy for increasing responses to your survey. In this workshop, you will learn how key decisions on survey design and administration can impact the number of responses you receive. We will also discuss why the number of responses is important and provide you with practical yet effective techniques for getting more people to participate in your survey.

Lunch will be included. Please RSVP to surveys@lmu.edu or (310) 338-6691.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Understanding APRC Process: What You Should Know when Submitting Proposals for New and Modified Programs 
Thursday, March 13, 2014, from 4:00 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Academic Planning and Review Committee (APRC)

Are you thinking about proposing a new program or considering modifying an existing program? Have you wondered how the Academic Planning and Review Committee works as an organ of shared governance at LMU? Would you like advice on how to make a proposal to the APRC stronger? This presentation and conversation will discuss the role of the APRC in reviewing proposals for new and modified programs, go through typical scenarios for how new programs and modifications to existing programs begin, and offer some tips on how to avoid problems often encountered in proposals.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

****Event cancelled as of 3/12/14****

Helping Students Learn Discipline-Specific Ways of Thinking and Practicing: Examples from Across the Disciplines
Wednesday, March 19, 2014, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Contributors:
John David Dionisio, PhD, Computer Science
Elizabeth Drummond, PhD, History
Rachel Washburn, PhD, Sociology

Recent research suggests that lasting learning occurs when students understand and can apply disciplinary perspectives and frameworks. Yet as instructors we often focus on content knowledge and fail to emphasize the methods of inquiry that characterize our disciplines. During this panel presentation, faculty from the humanities, social sciences, and computer sciences will describe strategies for helping students learn discipline-specific ways of thinking and practicing. Presenters will discuss common learning challenges for students and the specific steps they have taken to address these challenges, especially with respect to assignments. Though there will be short, formal presentations from three faculty members, we have scheduled plenty of time for discussion. We welcome faculty from across disciplines to join us in considering strategies for making discipline-specific modes of inquiry a more central part of our teaching. 

This presentation is part of Rachel Washburn's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Engaging Students in Disciplinary Ways of Knowing and Practicing.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Focusing on LMU's Undergraduate Learning Outcomes: Creative and Critical Thinking and Oral Communication
Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Laura Massa, Director of Assessment

We will look at evidence of how well LMU seniors perform these tasks, talk about ways to teach these skills, and discuss how to improve performance as we focus on LMU’s Creative and Critical Thinking and Oral Communication Undergraduate Learning Outcomes. We will also share how academic departments have addressed the Quantitative Literacy and Information Literacy evidence that was presented last spring semester.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or x82628.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

LearnSmart™,  A Textbook-Bundled, Metacognitive Study Tool — Is it Really as Good As it Seems?
Thursday, March 27, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By:
Nicole Bouvier-Brown, PhD, Chemistry & Biochemistry 
Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology

Publishers of college textbooks are increasingly bundling what appear to be sophisticated technology-based study tools with their texts.  These tools seem promising because they imbed features—such as aids for assisting students to think metacognitively—that existing research suggests can improve student learning. But are such textbook-bundled tools indeed as effective as the well-developed, well-implemented interventions in research studies? Given that that these tools pose financial and opportunity costs for students and instructors, empirical evidence is needed about whether and under what conditions they are effective.  LearnSmart™ is one such tool that McGraw Hill bundles with its General Chemistry textbook.  The tool imbeds metacognitive aids to help students monitor understanding and steer learning.  We conducted a study that examined efficacy of LearnSmart for improving science learning. We compared students who used LearnSmart for their first-semester undergraduate General Chemistry course to those who did not; in addition, we compared these two groups to students who used LearnSmart but received scaffolded support to use the tool’s metacognitive features through materials we developed. Findings and their implications for use of these tools in classes are discussed. 

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Sharing Teaching and Experiences: Conclusion of the Open Classrooms Weeks Spring 2014
Friday, March 28, 2014 at 3:00 PM

**Event cancelled as of 3/28/14**

Event Flyer

Let’s get together and enjoy each other’s company, experiences, and some good food and a nice drink.

Please click HERE for information about the Open Classrooms Weeks initiative.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.
The Creative Mind: Using Cognitive Science to Improve Understanding and Pedagogy of the Arts
Tuesday, April 1, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Deborah Rifkin, Associate Professor of Music Theory, Ithaca College

No matter the form or genre, all art is an expression or application of creative skill and imagination that can be appreciated for its beauty, impact, or emotional effect. Because art is an outgrowth of culture and society, we can often perceive similar aesthetics between diverse art forms that are produced in the same context and time period. For example, Enlightenment ideals are evident in both Mozart’s sonatas and the Federal-style architecture of our capitol buildings.  However, we approach each art form with different cognitive abilities specific to its medium. Music and dance are genres that unfold over time, in contrast to the visual arts that present a whole work at once. Since our cognitive processes for conceptualizing and organizing time are different than those for visual and spatial stimuli, we perceive the art differently. In this presentation/workshop, we will explore the role of our cognitive processes in the understanding and teaching of the arts. Specifically, using interactive exercises we will demonstrate the importance of memory and image schema for conceptualizing meaning in music, visual arts, theatre, and dance.

Biography
Deborah Rifkin (Associate Professor of Music Theory) is an award-winning music theory and sight-singing teacher at Ithaca College in the Finger Lakes region of New York State. Her research interests include the music of 20th-century neo-tonal composers, feminist and narrative theories and their contributions to music analysis, and pedagogy of aural skills. She has published articles in Music Theory Spectrum, Theory and Practice, twentieth-century music, Ex Tempore, and Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy. She also has a book chapter forthcoming (2014) in Analytic Essays on Music by Women Composers published by Oxford University Press. She earned her Ph.D. in music theory in 2000 from the Eastman School of Music. Deborah started out as a classical violinist, earning prizes and prestigious seats in regional orchestras in her youth and graduate studies. She studied with Janet Baker, Andrew Jennings, and Hamao Fujiwara. Now, she is an avid fiddler, performing and teaching Klezmer, Celtic, and contradance styles each summer at Folk College, in the hills of Pennsylvania.

Throughout twenty years of teaching college music majors at some of the top conservatories in the country, (Eastman School of Music, University of Michigan, Oberlin College Conservatory, and Ithaca College,) Deborah noticed that aural skills develop more slowly than other kinds of learning, such as written or kinesthetic skills. Intrigued by this phenomenon, which suggests that the learning process for aural skills could be different compared to other types, she collaborated with Philip Stoecker (from Hofstra University) to develop a learning taxonomy geared specifically for music classes. Deborah and Philip sought adaptations of Bloom’s taxonomy that catered specifically to music learning by accommodating the time-sensitive nature of performed arts, rather than the more spatial emphasis that arguably persists with most learning theories. Their resultant music learning taxonomy, which integrates recent advances in cognition and pedagogy studies, has garnered national attention not only among college music teachers, but also in general education communities invested in evidence-based scholarship of teaching and learning, such as ISSOTL and the Lilly Conferences.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Articles written by Rifkin that might interest those attending the talk include:
  • “A Revised Taxonomy for Music Learning” Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy 25 (2011): 1-35. (Co-authored with Philip Stoecker.)
  • “Developing Aural Skills: It’s Not Just a Game” Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy 20 (2006), 57–78. (Co-authored with Diane Urista.) Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.
Resources:

Debriefing FYS – Evaluating the Fall ’13 FYS Faculty Experience
Thursday, April 3, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer


This session is designed for faculty who taught FYS in Fall '13, or who are scheduled to teach FYS in Fall '14. The session will be divided into three parts: 1) a panel of three FYS faculty and three writing instructors from Fall '13 will discuss their experiences working together over the course of the semester, offering insight into specific challenges and strategies for success; 2) small group discussions of FYS faculty reflecting on how to improve/design their FYS course; and 3) a plenary conversation seeking to draw together common problems and best practices.

Please direct all questions to Jeffrey Siker or Danelle Dyckhoff.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Teaching First-Year Students: Introducing Students to Academic Life and Expectations at College
Thursday, April 10, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 Pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by:
 Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Center for Teaching Excellence
 Shelby Schaefer, MA, University Advisor
 Andrew (A.J.) Ogilvie, MA, University Advisor

What challenges do First-Year Students typically face in their transition to college? How do these challenges manifest themselves in our classes? How can we support students in adjusting to college and LMU specifically? What implications does this have for core and other courses predominantly taken by first-year students? We will provide an overview about transition challenges for first-year students and those that have emerged among LMU students, in the Core and elsewhere. There will be ample room to discuss challenges instructors have experienced and to consider successful strategies.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:


Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate: Creating Assignments Outside the Box
Tuesday, April 15, 2014, from 4:30PM to 5:45PM

Event Flyer

Do you have an assignment you would like to redesign? Do you want feedback from colleagues about your assignments? We invite you to join us for the last Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate event of the academic year, where we will be trying a new, interdisciplinary approach to assignment design. We will take assignments provided by participants in this WCC and modify them in teams. How would a social scientist redesign an assignment in engineering? How would a biologist help to create a literature assignment? We hope this creative exchange between colleagues from different disciplines will not only help participants to view their own disciplines through fresh eyes, but will also yield some fantastic reimagined assignments. Please bring along and send us by email an assignment you would love to get input on. We are also interested in sharing assignments that work particularly well for you. If you do not have any assignments you would like feedback on, we would still love your participation and input.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Advanced Analytics at DIRECTV - Stats, Big Data, SAS and Data Scientists (CREATE-STEM)
Monday, April 21, 2014, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer


Presented by: Dan Chon, MBA, Director of Big Data and Advanced Analytics at Direct TV

With 27 million subscribers and $27 billion in annual revenue, DIRECTV provides digital satellite television in the United States and Latin America to residential and commercial accounts. Our team, the Advanced Analytics group, mines the large amounts of data collected on the customers to provide valuable insights in order to attract profitable subscribers, retain customers, and increase revenue.

We will focus our discussion around 3 main topics:
  • Types of analysis done today and the decisions made from it;
  • The tools and skills used in analysis;
  • Skills we are looking for in new hires.
Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This talk is part of the Collaborative Research in Education, Assessment, and Teaching Environments for the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


What is Rigor? Expectation across LMU and Beyond
Thursday, April 24, 2014, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Center for Teaching Excellence

What do we mean by rigor? Is there a well-defined concept called “rigor?” How does it manifest itself in different disciplines? What do LMU instructors think about it? Can rigor be assessed? And if so, how?

We will discuss contributions from the research on rigor and learning, key views from the larger rigor debate, responses to a survey among LMU faculty and video contributions, as well as evidence from student responses.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Core Course Design
Tuesday, May 13, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

During this hands-on workshop faculty will develop a core course through backward design. The morning session will focus on the long-run objectives and context of the course, learning outcomes to be developed and matched to the core requirements, to the development of a basic structure of the course. During the afternoon session participants will further develop the basic course structure, design appropriate assignments and other class activities, and consider different options to assess student learning. The workshop will be highly interactive and hands-on based on participants course ideas and materials and relying on feedback and suggestions from colleagues as the courses are being fleshed out.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Core Course Design
Tuesday, May 13, 2014, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

During this hands-on workshop faculty will develop a core course through backward design. The morning session will focus on the long-run objectives and context of the course, learning outcomes to be developed and matched to the core requirements, to the development of a basic structure of the course. During the afternoon session participants will further develop the basic course structure, design appropriate assignments and other class activities, and consider different options to assess student learning. The workshop will be highly interactive and hands-on based on participants course ideas and materials and relying on feedback and suggestions from colleagues as the courses are being fleshed out.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Lunch will be provided at 12:30pm and refreshments will be available in the afternoon. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Engaged Learning
Wednesday, May 14, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

This workshop focuses on best practices for integrating engaged learning into the overall course structure , on linking engaged learning to the theories and models covered in a course, and on enhancing critical thinking and long-run engagement by students. Based on examples, we will consider successful approaches, including assignment and in-class activities, and work on implementing them in the courses of the participants. The workshop offers the opportunity to consider different forms of engaged learning, to discuss our courses with colleagues, and to be inspired by their experiences and suggestions. Participants will leave with several developed class activities and ideas for more.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Designing an Effective and Innovative Interdisciplinary Course
Wednesday, May 14, 2014, from 5:30 PM to 9:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Barbara Tewksbury, PhD, Hamilton College

The purpose of the workshop is to help participants establish a road map for getting from the germ of a good idea for an interdisciplinary course to an actual effective and innovative course. Participants will start by setting goals for students - what students should be able to do at the end of a course. Having set specific goals for students, participants will then work through how to use those goals to choose content effectively to build an innovative course, as well as begin to outline inquiry-based assignments and activities that can help students make progress toward the goals and provide a means for the instructor to assess that progress.

This workshop will be held in two parts: Wednesday night 5:30pm – 9:30pm (including dinner) and Thursday, 9:00am – 12:30pm.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Designing an Effective and Innovative Interdisciplinary Course
Thursday, May 15, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Barbara Tewksbury, PhD, Hamilton College

The purpose of the workshop is to help participants establish a road map for getting from the germ of a good idea for an interdisciplinary course to an actual effective and innovative course. Participants will start by setting goals for students - what students should be able to do at the end of a course. Having set specific goals for students, participants will then work through how to use those goals to choose content effectively to build an innovative course, as well as begin to outline inquiry-based assignments and activities that can help students make progress toward the goals and provide a means for the instructor to assess that progress.

This workshop will be held in two parts: Wednesday night 5:30pm – 9:30pm (including dinner) and Thursday, 9:00am – 12:30pm.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Practical and Effective Inquiry-Based Teaching Strategies for Engaging Students
Thursday, May 15, 2014, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Barbara Tewksbury, PhD, Hamilton College

This short workshop will introduce a set of effective inquiry-based strategies along with ideas for how to implement them successfully in the classroom. Participants will have a chance to outline a specific activity that can be implemented immediately. Although this workshop can be taken as a stand-alone, those who participate in the course design portion on Wednesday night and Thursday will outline an activity that specifically addresses one of the course goals developed earlier in the workshop.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Lunch will be provided at 12:30pm and refreshments will be available in the afternoon. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Integrating Information Literacy into Your Classes
Friday, May 16, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Contributors:
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, Center for Teaching Excellence
Susan Gardner, MS, William H. Hannon Library
Elisa Slater Acosta, MS, William H. Hannon Library
Other LMU Faculty

This workshop will focus on developing assignments and other course elements (lecture, in-class activities, etc.) to integrate information literacy in your classes (satisfying the core flag, First-Year Seminar, Rhetorical Arts, or other class). Starting from the definition of information literacy, we will look at several successful models and examples of integrating information literacy into the Core, and dedicate a significant amount of time to providing you with the time and support to develop fully-fledged information literacy assignments for your class(es).

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Leading with Reading: Strategic Instruction to Deepen Students’ Understanding of Complex Texts
Monday, May 19, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

Successful academic inquiry begins with careful and thoughtful reading, and students often struggle with this initial stage of learning. Because reading primarily happens individually and outside of the classroom, it can be difficult to teach students more advanced reading strategies appropriate for engaging theoretical or complex texts. This workshop will identify different reading strategies for different genres, and focus on exercises and tools that can be used to deepen students’ attention to and understanding of complex texts, including tools available for working with online texts.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Resources:

Arguing Across the Curriculum
Monday, May 19, 2014, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

Students usually know that they are supposed to have a “thesis” in their papers, but they often do not understand how to craft an arguable claim that they can develop with evidence, reasoning, and analysis, or how to logically structure that evidence and reasoning to support the thesis. In class discussions, also, they often don’t understand how to develop or support claims, how to respond thoughtfully to the claims of other students, or how to use discussion, debate, or argument as a means of inquiry to deepen their understanding of an idea. Indeed, the various kinds of arguments, claims, and evidence that students need to produce in different classes can lead to greater confusion about writing as they enter college and are required to write in many disciplines. This workshop will address some foundational concepts in argumentation, including warrants, qualifiers, stases, and argumentation schemes, that can unify and bring order to some of the diversity that students encounter as they argue across the curriculum. Specific focus will be placed on methods of introducing these concepts to students and integrating them into classroom discussion and writing instruction.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Lunch will be provided at 12:30pm and refreshments will be available in the afternoon. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Click HERE for workshop resources.


Text and Context: Helping Students Develop a Rhetorical Awareness of Audience, Purpose, and Genre
Tuesday, May 20, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

Research shows that, in order to adapt their writing for different purposes, students need to develop the ability to analyze audience expectations and to analyze how genres function rhetorically. Writing instruction that begins with these forms of analysis helps students to understand how to generate and structure ideas appropriately for different contexts, and helps them to develop a metacognitive understanding that aids their transfer of writing knowledge from one assignment to another. This workshop will offer both a brief theoretical framework for understanding rhetorical awareness, and many practical ideas for incorporating audience and genre analysis in the classroom. It will also introduce the concept of generative rubrics, which function as both guides to the writing process and as rich tools for feedback.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Click HERE for workshop resources.


Developing Reading and Writing Assignments for Your Classes
Tuesday, May 20, 2014, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

Based on Suzanne Lane’s Workshops on Monday and Tuesday morning, participants develop their own assignment ideas in discussion with other workshop participants and Suzanne Lane. The point of this workshop is to properly develop assignments (not just to sketch them out), i.e. participants should bring their syllabi and have some idea of what they want to achieve with an assignment, where it fits into a class, etc.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Lunch will be provided at 12:30pm and refreshments will be available in the afternoon. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Click HERE for workshop resources.


Sequencing and Scaffolding Writing and Speaking Assignments
Wednesday, May 21, 2014, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

A main goal of the First-Year Seminars is that students will learn to “engage critically and reflectively in scholarly discourse,” but what kinds of in-class activities will promote this learning? What teaching needs to occur before students can fully engage with writing and speaking assignments? How should assignments change and build on each other over the course of the semester? This workshop will help faculty consider the various concepts and contexts that shape student writing and speaking, and will offer strategies for constructing both the sequence of assignments over a semester, and the instruction that will support and scaffold student learning through those assignments. Working with examples from different disciplines, and with both formal and informal assignments, participants will gain hands-on experience with working backwards from the learning objectives, to designing the assignment sequence, to developing the in-class activities that will promote learning.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Click HERE for workshop resources.


Developing Reading and Speaking Assignments for Your Classes
Wednesday, May 21, 2014, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

Based on Suzanne Lane’s Workshops on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday morning, participants develop a sequencing and scaffolding structure for their reading and speaking assignments in their class in exchange with other workshop participants and Suzanne Lane. Participants should bring their syllabi and have a solid idea of the structure of the class, planned readings, and what potential assignments are. During the workshop participants will develop these assignment ideas into a coherent and properly sequenced structure.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Lunch will be provided at 12:30pm and refreshments will be available in the afternoon. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Click HERE for workshop resources.