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Spring 2013

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

Semesters:  [Fall 2014]    [Spring 2014]    [Fall 2013]    [Spring 2013]    [Fall 2012]    [Spring 2012]    [Fall 2011]

Date Event Speaker(s)/Presenter(s)
1/10/13  Part-Time Faculty Orientation I Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
1/12/13  Part-Time Faculty Orientation II Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
1/17/13 Predicting Teaching Evaluation Scores and the Importance of the Comprehensive Evaluation of Teaching Bryce Mason, PhD, Office of Institutional Research
Kevin Wetmore, PhD, Theatre, and Committee on the Comprehensive Evaluation of Teaching (CCET) 
1/18/13  Teaching with Technology Day 2013  
1/22/13  Standards-Based Grading John David Dionisio, PhD, Computer Science
Matt Siniawski, PhD, Mechanical Engineering
1/22/13  Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Gathering Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology
1/31/13  Measuring Student Engagement in Online Courses Todd Shoepe, EdD, MS, CSCS, ACSM - HFS, Health and Human Sciences
Nick Mattos, Information Technology Services
2/5/13 Building a Toolkit for Supporting Metacognition in the Classroom: Lessons from Middle School    
2/7/13  Preparing Your Grant Proposal Joseph McNicholas, PhD, MBA, Director for the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects
2/12/13  Strategies for Fostering Intellectual Virtues in the Classroom Jason Baehr, PhD, Philosophy
2/14/13  Writing Meaningful Student Learning Outcomes for Your Program Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment
2/19/13  Teaching and Assessing Critical Thinking Diane F. Halpern, PhD, Psychology, Claremont McKenna College
2/21/13  Promoting Student Engagement in Online Classes Part I: Virtual Classes Todd Shoepe, EdD, MS, CSCS, ACSM - HFS, Health and Human Sciences 
2/25/13  SERS: The Math and Science Teaching System Overview Kathy Clemmer, Director of the Center for Math and Science Teaching (CMAST)
3/11/13  Achievement, Retention and Equity Craig Nelson, PhD, Biology, Indiana University, Emeritus
3/11/13  How To Use Active Learning Easily Craig Nelson, PhD, Biology, Indiana University, Emeritus
3/12/13  Why Critical Thinking is so Hard for Students to Learn and How We Can Help Craig Nelson, PhD, Biology, Indiana University, Emeritus
3/14/13  Unleashing the Power of Rubrics Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment
3/18/13  SERS: Virtual Environments in the Classroom for the Long Haul Stephanie August, PhD, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 
3/21/13  Please Take My Survey! Christine Chavez, MA, Surveys and Evaluation
3/25/13  Structuring and Sequencing Writing Assignments Suzanne Lane, PhD, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
3/25/13  Collaborating with Writing Instructors in a First-Year Seminar Suzanne Lane, PhD, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
4/2/13  Supporting Students to Transfer Learning: CTE Masters Teachers Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology

4/8/13  What are Our Students Learning? A Conversation about what Evidence Shows Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment
4/9/13  Grantwriting Workshop Joseph McNicholas, PhD, MBA, Director for the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects
4/15/13  How Social Media, Memory Science, and Student Performance Metrics Are Shaping the Future of Learning Brian Hoover, PhD 
4/16/13
Hype, Hyperbole, and Hope: Finding a Signal in all of the MOOC Noise
Amy Collier, PhD, Director for Technology and Teaching, Stanford University
4/18/13
Incorporating the Library's Information Literacy Tutorials in Your First Year Seminar
Elisa Slater Acosta, Hannon Library
Susan Gardner Archambault, Hannon Library
Lindsey McLean, Hannon Library
4/22/13
SERS: Future Teachers' Views of Mathematics and Intentions for Gender Equity
Jackie Dewar, PhD, Mathematics
4/23/13  On Becoming Contemplatives in Action: An interdisciplinary, immersive approach Jennifer Abe, PhD, Psychology
Douglas Christie, PhD, Theological Studies
Bede Healy, OSB Cam
Students TBD 
4/29/13
It Takes a Village: Embedding Information Literacy into the First-Year Experience 
Anne-Marie Deitering, MLS, Oregon State University
4/29/13
Information Literacy in the Classroom: Tips and Tools
Anne-Marie Deitering, MLS, Oregon State University
5/2/13
Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Gathering - 5/2
Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology
5/13/13
Jesuit Rhetorical Tradition
Steven Mailloux, PhD, English
K.J. Peters, PhD, English
5/13/13 Rhetorical Principles and Practices
K.J. Peters, PhD, English
5/14/13
Immersion - FYS/RA Model: Greenwich Village
Mary Jane Treacy, PhD, Spanish and Women's Studies, Simmons College
5/15/13
Interdisciplinary Course Design
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
5/16/13
Integrating Information Literacy
Susan Gardner, MSLS, Hannon Library
Elisa Slater Acosta, Hannon Library
5/17/13 Integrating Oral Skills
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
5/20/13
Knowledge and Acknowledgement: Teaching Students to Write with )and Cite) Sources
Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/21/13
Integrating Writing and Speaking to Foster Critical Thinking and Engaged Learning
Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT
5/22/13 Core Course Design
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE


Part-Time Faculty Orientation I
Thursday, January 10, 2013, from 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the new-faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
We will conclude with lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you during your teaching, such as the Library, the Academic Resource Center, Center for Service and Action, Registrar's Office, IT, etc. Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning.

ECHO Recording: Part I, Part II, Part III

Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.


Part-Time Faculty Orientation II
Saturday, January 12, 2013, from 8:30 AM to 1:30 PM

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the new-faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
We will conclude with lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you during your teaching, such as the Library, the Academic Resource Center, Center for Service and Action, Registrar's Office, IT, etc. Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning.

Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.
Predicting Teaching Evaluation Scored and the Importance of the Comprehensive Evaluation of Teaching
Thursday, January 17, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Bryce Mason, Ph.D., Office of Institutional Research

Moderated by: Kevin Wetmore, Ph.D., Theatre, and Committee on the Comprehensive Evaluation of Teaching (CCET)

Predicting Teaching Evaluation Scores and the Importance of the Comprehensive Evaluation of Teaching [Event Flyer]

Join the Committee on the Comprehensive Evaluation of Teaching (CCET) and the Office of Institutional Research (IR) in a dialog about the role of student evaluation of teaching (SET) at LMU. Late in 2011, considering how SET scores should be used in the teaching evaluation process, the CCET commissioned IR to explore a number of hypotheses. Do students rate core and major courses differently? Are there differences based on student interest? What does faculty rank imply? Do instructor gender, ethnicity, or even class time matter? The answers to these questions and other hypotheses will be presented by IR, followed by a CCET-led reflective dialog about their implications for the comprehensive evaluation of teaching.

Summary Paper: Mason, B., Johnson, R., "Predictors of LMU Student Evaluations of Teaching Scores."
Statistical Appendix available upon request.
Presentation
Evaluating Teaching Slides
ECHO Recording

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866. 


Standards-Based Grading
Tuesday, January 22, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM UNH 3030

Presented by:   
John David Dionisio, Ph.D., Computer Science
  Matt Siniawski, Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering

Standards-Based Grading: Preliminary Studies to Quantify Changes in Affective and Cognitive Student Behaviors [Event Flyer]

Most science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) higher education instructors utilize summative score-based grading systems to assess student performance. Standards-based grading is an alternative assessment approach involving the direct measurement of student development towards specific course objectives. Student development is tracked using a standards achievement report rather than assigning one-time individual scores to student assignments. Pilot studies were conducted in multiple STEM courses to assess the pedagogical value of standards-based grading and its impact on student cognitive and affective behaviors. Affective behavior was measured by assessing changes in students’ self-efficacy and the value placed on standards-based grading. Cognitive behavior was measured by assessing students’ ability to understand course concepts and their epistemological beliefs of STEM knowledge. This presentation covers the overall design and structure of standards-based grading, observed implementation best practices, and a discussion of measured changes in student affective and cognitive behaviors resulting from this system.

ECHO Presentation

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.


Teaching with Technology Day 2013
Friday, January 18, 2013, from 1:00 PM to 4:30 PM

Teaching with Technology Day [Event Flyer]

For details, please see here.

Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Gathering
Tuesday, January 22, 2013, from 4:30 PM to 5:45 PM in Marymount Center (UNH 3002)

Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer - Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate Gathering [Event Flyer]

Presented by: Vandana Thadani, Ph.D., Psychology

The Wine, Cheese, Chocolate Hour (and 15 minutes) is back! These informal gatherings are a chance to share ideas and experiences related to teaching and learning, over some delicious, calorie-rich refreshments. Several of us have goals that we’d like to achieve with students—for example, metacognition, intrinsic motivation, persistence, or deeper understanding and application of course material. All of these ideas are related to this year’s program, “Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.” For this gathering, bring any ideas about innovations you are trying (have tried) with a class that might enhance outcomes such as those listed above--or alternatively, bring goals you’d like to achieve with students that might benefit from collective brainstorming. For those who attended the Dondi Dionisio and Matt Siniawski's afternoon presentation on Standards Based Grading, we can also continue our conversation about this topic. I hope you’ll join me and our colleagues to chat, share, reconnect, eat and drink, or just absorb!

Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call x85866.

This event is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.

Measuring Student Engagement in Online Courses
Thursday, January 31, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Measuring Student Engagement in Online Classes [Event flyer]

Presented By: 
 Todd Shoepe, Health and Human Sciences 
   Nick Mattos, Information Technology Services

Student engagement is perhaps the most important goal of educators. Identifying it and quantifying it when it happens can be challenging. This session will focus on a working definition based on the National Survey for Student Engagement (NSSE) in quantifying and categorizing student engagement in virtual classrooms. While this session will directly include examples from online synchronous class sessions, the findings are relevant to all instructional deliveries. Both qualitative and quantitative data will be presented to demonstrate the potential of online classes to support a high frequency and richness of student engagement.

This presentation is part of Todd Shoepe's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Examining the Pedagogy of Online Education and Technology.

ECHO Recording

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Library Materials

Defining Student Engagement:

Online Student Engagement: Computer Mediated Communication:
Building a Toolkit for Supporting Metacognition in the Classroom: Lessons from Middle School Science Teachers
Tuesday, February 5, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Building a Toolkit for Supporting Metacognition in the Classroom: Lessons from Middle School Science Teachers [Event Flyer]

Enacting metacognition in the classroom is no small feat. Students can resist this kind of thinking because it’s effortful. And as instructors, most of us have had little training on how to support students to think metacognitively. I’ve been conducting research in science classrooms to examine how a small group of teachers “spontaneously”—with no researcher support and in their natural environments—support students’ metacognitive thinking. Close analyses of the videotaped lessons suggest that by looking across teachers, we can actually start identifying very specific ways of supporting students’ metacognition and other forms of higher order thinking—through every day classroom interactions, with no (or few) bells and whistles. In essence, pooled together, these different strategies can be the beginnings of a toolkit for metacognitively-supportive teaching practices. In this talk, I will present this research and then we will discuss applications to our own practice.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.

ECHO Recording

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Preparing Your Grant Proposal
Thursday, February 7, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Joseph McNicholas, Ph.D, M.B.A., Director for the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects.

Preparing Your Grant Proposal [Event Flyer]

This session is designed for faculty who wish to develop grant concepts in research, in educational programs, and in outreach activities. We explore methods of brainstorming and idea testing. We'll discuss creating white papers and research plans as well as coordinating publishing, teaching and proposal schedules. And we'll address the first phases of preparing a grant proposal at LMU. Come ready to talk about your work and listen to the stories of others. It promises to be an interactive and engaging session, appropriate to those who are new to grant writing or those who are returning to the topic after some time away.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

ECHO Recording


Strategies for Fostering Intellectual Virtues in the Classroom
Tuesday, February 12, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Strategies for Fostering Intellectual Virtues in the Classroom [Event Flyer]

Presented by: Jason Baehr, PhD, Philosophy

Intellectual virtues are the character traits of a good thinker or learner. They include traits like curiosity, intellectual carefulness, intellectual thoroughness, open-mindedness, intellectual rigor, and intellectual humility. This session is a follow up to a fall session that introduced the concept of intellectual virtue and sought to distinguish intellectual virtues from related cognitive and moral strengths. In this session, I will offer a very brief overview of what intellectual virtues are, followed by a brief explanation of several strategies for fostering intellectual virtues in the classroom. The better part of the session will be spent discussing what it might look like to implement these strategies across different disciplines and in the courses we teach at LMU.

This talk complements the presentation "Teaching for Intellectual Virtues" in the fall.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

ECHO Recording
Resource Guide: Educating for Intellectual Virtues: Some Strategies and Resources for University Instructors


Writing Meaningful Student Learning Outcomes for Your Program
Thursday, February 14, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment

Does your program have meaningful and measurable student learning outcomes? Have you made changes to your program or are you developing a new program? Whether you are considering revising your current student learning outcomes or are writing them for the first time, this workshop is for you. Writing Meaningful Student Learning Outcomes for Your Program will provide a simple three-step guide for writing student learning outcomes, share helpful hints, and discuss the benefits of student learning outcomes for faculty and students. Participants will be given time to try out these techniques by writing their own learning outcomes.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or x82828.


Teaching and Assessing Critical Thinking
Tuesday, February 19, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by:   Diane F. Halpern, Ph.D., Psychology 
  Claremont McKenna College

Teaching and Assessing Critical Thinking: Helping College Students Become Better Thinkers [Event Flyer]

The data are clear: we can teach critical thinking skills so they generalize across domains and last long into the future. In this presentation, we will discuss ways to enhance and assess critical thinking for college students.
As instructors, we all aim to help students transfer learning from our lessons and coursework to something else: course papers, projects, and ultimately (we hope!) outside of our classrooms. Yet, as many of us have experienced firsthand, helping students learn in ways that allows them to transfer effectively is challenging! Critical thinking—important in its own right—is a skill that can help students transfer. In this talk, Prof. Diane Halpern (Claremont McKenna College, Department of Psychology) will describe what research tells us are effective ways to promote critical thinking and transfer.

Dr. Halpern was formerly president of the American Psychological Association. She has won numerous awards for her teaching and research (to name a few: the Outstanding Professor Award from the Western Psychological Association, the American Psychological Foundation Award for Distinguished Teaching, the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Career Award for Contributions to Education, and most recently, the Association for Psychological Science’ James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award for a lifetime of outstanding contributions to applied psychological research). She is a leading expert on the topic of critical thinking.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.

Slides
ECHO Recording
Critical Thinking Skills List

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.


Promoting Student Engagement in Online Classes Part I: Virtual Classes
Thursday, February 21, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Promoting Student Engagement in Online Classes Part I: Virtual Classes [Event flyer]

Presented By: Todd Shoepe, Health and Human Sciences

Student engagement – represented by the total time that students spend in the presence of course material is one of the cornerstones of successful educational practice. This session will focus on the behaviors and specific actions of the instructor that are related to student engagement. By understanding the role the instructor plays in promoting student engagement, activities can be generated to match course learning objectives. Results from a recent investigation describing the relationship between instructor action and student engagement will be presented. Participants will take away from this session the ability to better understand how to design and facilitate live online class sessions. While the examples for this session come from online synchronous class transcripts, there will be application to all instructional practices.

This presentation is part of Todd Shoepe's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Examining the Pedagogy of Online Education and Technology.

ECHO Recording

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866. 

Library Materials

Defining Student Engagement:

Online Student Engagement: Computer Mediated Communication:
SERS: The Math and Science Teaching System Overview
February 25, 2013, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM in UNH 3030

SERS: The Math and Science Teaching System Overview [Event flyer]

Presented By: Kathy Clemmer, Director of the Center for Math and Science Teaching (CMAST)

The Math and Science Teaching System is a systematic approach to instructional design that promotes student engagement in learning mathematics and science, perseverance in problem solving, and embraces students as equal partners in assessment for learning. At it’s core, MAST is a methodology for designing, delivering, and assessing student learning in high school mathematics and science courses. Within this system, learning targets are the instructional driver, homework is a choice, assessments are not averaged, student interests are consistently incorporated into the lesson design, and technology is a tool integrated throughout. In this talk I will share the highlights of the MAST System, the successes, the challenges, and the implications for entry level college math and science courses.

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866. 


Achievement, Retention and Equity
Monday, March 11, 2013, from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Achievement, Retention and Equity:
Key Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom Without Lowering Standards [Event Flyer]

Presented By: Craig Nelson, PhD, Biology, Indiana University, Emeritus

In this workshop, we will examine some key pedagogical changes that can make real differences in achievement, retention and equity in almost any college or university classroom without lowering the standards for achievement. Specific topics will include: 1. How can an instructor radically reduce or eliminate low grades in lecture courses without lowering standards? 2. How can we make our students brighter and harder working using only 1 hour of class time (in ways that level the playing field for all groups)? We will distinguish between keeping or even raising standards for achievement and certain dysfunctional illusions of rigor that can get in the way of effective teaching. We will discuss how standard university teaching is often ineffective even when the students are working reasonably hard and how alternative approaches can lead to large increases in student success and in equity.

Craig E. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he has been since 1966. His biological research (60+ papers) has been on evolution and ecology, most recently on sex-determination in turtles. His articles on teaching (20+) address critical thinking and mature valuing, diversity, active learning, teaching evolution and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has presented invited workshops on these and related topics at numerous national meetings and at many individual institutions, both here and abroad. He has taught several courses in biology as well as freshman seminars, honors courses, collaboratively taught interdisciplinary courses (mostly in environmental studies) and regularly taught a graduate course on "Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology." He was instrumental in the development of IU's Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) program and was founding Director of Environmental Programs in its School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He received several awards for distinguished teaching, was named the "Outstanding Research And Doctoral University Professor Of The Year 2000" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and received the President's Medal for Excellence, "the highest honor bestowed by Indiana University," in 2001. He was the first President of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, which he helped found in 2004.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.
Please do join us also if you cannot stay for the entire 90 minutes.

Please contact the CTE for any of the following:
  • Handout: "Achievement, Retention and Equity: Key Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom Without Lowering Standards"
  • Achievement-Retention-Equity Presentation Recording
  • Other Material:
    • Handout: "A Brief Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)"
    • Bibliography: "Suggested Resources for Scholarly Teaching (ST) and for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) with a Focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)"
    • Handout: "How to Do Active Learning Easily not only for STEM & Other Content-Heavy Classes"
    • Critical Thinking Handout: "Why Critical Thinking is so Hard for Students to Learn? How Can We Help?"
    • Handout: "The 'Red Pen' Worksheet"
    • Handout: "Fostering Achievement, Retention & Equity for All Students: Key Recent Examples"
Other talks by Craig Nelson at LMU:

How To Use Active Learning Easily
Monday, March 11, 2013, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM

How To Use Active Learning Easily in Any Class including STEM & Other Content Heavy Classes[Event Flyer]

Presented By: Craig Nelson, PhD, Biology, Indiana University, Emeritus

In content heavy courses we often feel compelled to cover as much material as possible. In this workshop we will quickly examine some evidence how this can be a self-defeating strategy. We will then focus on more effective strategies that can be used in a class of any size. These rely in active learning that has been carefully structured by the teacher to optimize learning.

Craig E. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he has been since 1966. His biological research (60+ papers) has been on evolution and ecology, most recently on sex-determination in turtles. His articles on teaching (20+) address critical thinking and mature valuing, diversity, active learning, teaching evolution and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has presented invited workshops on these and related topics at numerous national meetings and at many individual institutions, both here and abroad. He has taught several courses in biology as well as freshman seminars, honors courses, collaboratively taught interdisciplinary courses (mostly in environmental studies) and regularly taught a graduate course on "Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology." He was instrumental in the development of IU's Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) program and was founding Director of Environmental Programs in its School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He received several awards for distinguished teaching, was named the "Outstanding Research And Doctoral University Professor Of The Year 2000" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and received the President's Medal for Excellence, "the highest honor bestowed by Indiana University," in 2001. He was the first President of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, which he helped found in 2004.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.
Please contact the CTE for any of the following:
  • Handout: "How to Do Active Learning Easily not only for STEM & Other Content-Heavy Classes"
  • Handout: "The 'Red Pen' Worksheet"
  • Active Learning Presentation Recording
  • Other Material:
    • Handout: "A Brief Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)"
    • Bibliography: "Suggested Resources for Scholarly Teaching (ST) and for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) with a Focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)"
    • Handout: "Achievement, Retention and Equity: Key Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom Without Lowering Standards"
    • Critical Thinking Handout: "Why Critical Thinking is so Hard for Students to Learn? How Can We Help?"
    • Handout: "The 'Red Pen' Worksheet"
    • Handout: "Fostering Achievement, Retention & Equity for All Students: Key Recent Examples"
Other talks by Craig Nelson at LMU:

Why Critical Thinking is so Hard for Students to Learn and How We Can Help 
Thursday, March 12, 2013, from 10:45 AM to 12:15 PM in UNH 3030

Why Critical Thinking is so Hard for Students to Learn and How We Can Help [Event Flyer]

Presented By: Craig Nelson, PhD, Biology, Indiana University, Emeritus

Sophistication in thinking is prerequisite to many of the goals of liberal and professional education including critical thinking, mature valuing, effective oral and written communication and much more. The basic question is: Why are sophisticated ways of thinking so difficult for students to acquire? We will examine a major framework for fostering critical thinking and related skills: intellectual and ethical development. However, help with cognitive frameworks is only half of our challenges as teachers. For most students, critical thinking is a deeply social enterprise. The most dramatic gains by far come from carefully structured discussions and other aspects of social dynamics. An underlying theme will be that critical thinking can often be fostered best by increasing the ratio of support offered for a given level of challenge. This approach applies to ALL students but is even more important for those from non-dominant backgrounds.

Craig E. Nelson is Professor Emeritus of Biology at Indiana University in Bloomington, where he has been since 1966. His biological research (60+ papers) has been on evolution and ecology, most recently on sex-determination in turtles. His articles on teaching (20+) address critical thinking and mature valuing, diversity, active learning, teaching evolution and the scholarship of teaching and learning. He has presented invited workshops on these and related topics at numerous national meetings and at many individual institutions, both here and abroad. He has taught several courses in biology as well as freshman seminars, honors courses, collaboratively taught interdisciplinary courses (mostly in environmental studies) and regularly taught a graduate course on "Alternative Approaches to Teaching College Biology." He was instrumental in the development of IU's Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SOTL) program and was founding Director of Environmental Programs in its School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He received several awards for distinguished teaching, was named the "Outstanding Research And Doctoral University Professor Of The Year 2000" by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) and received the President's Medal for Excellence, "the highest honor bestowed by Indiana University," in 2001. He was the first President of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, which he helped found in 2004.

Refreshments will be served following the talk. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please contact the CTE for any of the following:
  • Handout: "Why Critical Thinking is so Hard for Students to Learn? How Can We Help?"
  • Handout: "The 'Red Pen' Worksheet"
  • Critical Thinking Presentation Recording
  • Other Material:
    • Handout: "A Brief Introduction to the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)"
    • Bibliography: "Suggested Resources for Scholarly Teaching (ST) and for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) with a Focus on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)"
    • Handout: "Achievement, Retention and Equity: Key Pedagogical Changes that Can Make a Real Difference in ANY College Classroom Without Lowering Standards"
    • Handout: "How to Do Active Learning Easily not only for STEM & Other Content-Heavy Classes"
    • Handout: "Fostering Achievement, Retention & Equity for All Students: Key Recent Examples"
Other talks by Craig Nelson at LMU:

Unleashing the Power of Rubrics
Thursday, March 14, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment

Rubrics are a powerful tool that can help you understand and promote student learning while saving you time. Unleashing the Power of Rubrics will present a 5-step process for creating rubrics, share ideas for how to enhance student learning with rubrics, and provide tips for speedily and successfully capturing what your students have learned.

As part of the workshop, participants will be given time to begin building a rubric. Bring along a description of an assignment so you can get started on your own rubric.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or x82828.

SERS: Virtual Environments in the Classroom for the Long Haul

Monday, March 18, 2013, from 3:00 PM to 4:00 PM in UNH 3030

Virtual Environments in the Classroom for the Long Haul:
Virtual environments are engaging, but how do we get them to work well… for many people… over an extended period of time? [Event flyer]

Presented By: Stephanie August, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Integration of 3D virtual world environments, game-based learning, and digital story telling into a STEM curriculum creates engaging content and provides students with simulated hands-on experiences and contextualized learning. We all agree that these activities can attract and retain students who would otherwise leave STEM majors or never even consider a career in a STEM field. But how do we get the environments to work well… for many people… over an extended period of time? Principle investigators attending the Virtual Environments in the Classroom workshop at the 2013 NSF TUES PI Conference identified a set of common concerns ranging from the ability to share content and the technical infrastructure required for content delivery through MOOCs and assessment to the need for interdisciplinary teams. This talk reviews examples of these interactive experiences and presents the proposed curriculum for an NSF PI Forum that grew out of the workshop and aims to develop a community to address these concerns.

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome. The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866. 


Please Take My Survey!
Thursday, March 21, 2013, 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Christine Chavez, MA, Surveys and Evaluation

Are you struggling to get more people to fill out your surveys? Many factors can influence a person’s decision to participate in a survey, but with careful consideration you can develop an effective strategy for increasing responses to your survey.

In this workshop, you will learn how key decisions on survey design and administration can impact the number of responses you receive. We will also discuss why the number of responses is important and provide you with practical yet effective techniques for getting more people to participate in your survey.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or x82828.

Structuring and Sequencing Writing Assignments
Monday, March 25, 2013, from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Structuring and Sequencing Writing Assignments [Event flyer]

Presented by: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

A main goal of the First-Year Seminars is that students will learn to “engage critically and reflectively in scholarly discourse,” but what kinds of writing assignments will promote this learning? What do assignment prompts need to explain for students to fully understand the task? How should assignments change and build on each other over the course of the semester? This workshop will help faculty consider the various concepts and contexts that shape student writing, and will offer strategies for constructing both individual assignments and the sequence of writing assignments over a semester. Working with examples from different disciplines, and with both formal assignments and informal, writing-to-learn prompts, participants will gain hands-on experience with thinking through modular, incremental, and cognitive sequencing.

Suzanne Lane is Acting Director of Writing Across the Curriculum in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies, and directs the Writing Advisor program in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Dr. Lane has taught Writing at Harvard University, and American and African American Literature at Boston University and California State University, San Bernardino. Dr. Lane’s research focuses on rhetorical and narrative theory, as well as on student writing development. As a researcher on the Harvard Study of Undergraduate Writing, Dr. Lane investigated how students learn the rhetorical cultures and conventions of different disciplines across the curriculum. In her current book project, Dr. Lane analyzes the rhetoric of slave narratives, academic histories, and historical novels of slavery. Parts of this work have been published in African American Review.

ECHO Recording

Other workshops by Suzanne Lane at LMU: Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Collaborating with Writing Instructors in a First-Year Seminar
Monday, March 25, 2013, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

This informal discussion will offer faculty a chance to think through the process of collaborating with a writing instructor in a first-year seminar. The discussion will begin with a brief presentation of central principles and practices, based on MIT’s 10 years of experience with pairing writing lecturers with disciplinary faculty in writing intensive courses. Faculty will then have the chance to raise questions, consider various approaches, and discuss the benefits and challenges of these collaborative teaching structures.

Suzanne Lane is Acting Director of Writing Across the Curriculum in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies, and directs the Writing Advisor program in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Dr. Lane has taught Writing at Harvard University, and American and African American Literature at Boston University and California State University, San Bernardino. Dr. Lane’s research focuses on rhetorical and narrative theory, as well as on student writing development. As a researcher on the Harvard Study of Undergraduate Writing, Dr. Lane investigated how students learn the rhetorical cultures and conventions of different disciplines across the curriculum. In her current book project, Dr. Lane analyzes the rhetoric of slave narratives, academic histories, and historical novels of slavery. Parts of this work have been published in African American Review.

ECHO Recording

Other workshops by Suzanne Lane at LMU: Refreshments to follow. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Supporting Students To Transfer Learning: CTE Master Teachers
Tuesday, April 2, 2013, from 12:!5 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Moderated By: Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology
Featuring: Elissa Grossman and Jeremy McCallum

Each year the CTE selects some of our own as “Master Teachers” – instructors, who, through a variety of means, provide enriching, rigorous learning experiences for our students. In this presentation CTE Master Teachers, Elissa Grossman (CBA, Management) and Jeremy McCallum (Seaver CSE, Chemistry and Biochemistry) will share some of their strategies for promoting transfer in students – that is, helping students apply knowledge they learned in class, readings, labs to other contexts (course projects, real world problems, and their own lives). As many of us know, transfer is often difficult to achieve because it requires students to both deeply understand course material and be motivated to work through challenging problems. This presentation will allow us to learn from, borrow, and adapt some powerful practices by LMU’s own highly talented teachers.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

What are Our Students Learning? A Conversation about what Evidence Shows
Monday, April 08, 2013, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in UNH 3030

What are Our Students Learning? A Conversation about what Evidence Shows [Event flyer]

Moderated By: Laura Massa, PhD, Director of Assessment

Curious about what our students say about how academically challenged they feel? Interested in learning about how capable our students are of performing key academic tasks like selecting a research topic that meets the criteria for an assignment you give? How about their ability to understand and explain information presented in tables and graphs?

Please join us for a conversation over wine and snacks about what we know about the answers to these questions and more. We will review the NSSE academic challenge data and what we have learned about student achievement of the Quantitative Literacy and Information Literacy Undergraduate Learning Outcomes. We will also discuss how we address these learning outcomes in our classes.

Snacks, wine, and other refreshments will be served.

Let us know if you will join us by sending a message to teachers@lmu.edu, x85866, or assessment@lmu.edu.

Grantwriting Workshop
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: Joseph McNicholas, Ph.D, M.B.A., Director for the Office of Research and Sponsored Projects.

Ever wonder what the difference is between a journal article and a grant proposal? Have you been curious to know how you can persuade a review panel or a program officer that your idea is worthy of funding?

During this workshop, titled “Rhetorical Foundations of Grantwriting” we will explore modes of persuasion appropriate to grants. We will address how to demonstrate that your project is appropriately designed and achievable; how to convey that you and your institution are prepared to manage the project; and how to link your goals closely to the goals of the funder. Toward that end, we will also read, analyze and discuss introductions to grant applications.

Because grant-getting is a two-way street, we will also read through some RFP’s and some actual feedback on grants from reviewers. Sample sections of grant proposals will be provided.

The session is designed be an interactive and engaging, and it should be appropriate to those who are new to grant writing or those who are returning to the topic after some time away.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to orsp@lmu.edu.

How Social Media, Memory Science, and Student Performance Metrics Are Shaping the Future of Learning
Monday, April 15, 2013, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

How Social Media, Memory Science, and Student Performance Metrics Are Shaping the Future of Learning [Event Flyer]

Presented by: Bill Hoover, Ph.D.

Imagine a world in which students perform a full letter grade higher than today, failure rates are cut in half, and retention rates increase dramatically. New digital learning tools based on years of pedagogical research and faculty and student input are helping to make it a reality. Roundtable discussions with faculty, students, software developers, and memory science experts have resulted in an entirely new approach to designing learning software technologies, providing more meaningful, holistic and intuitive solutions. This presentation will introduce the science behind these new digital learning tools and discuss how to effectively use them in and out of the classroom.

Dr. William Hoover is the cofounder of Tuatara Corporation, an educational technology platform, in Boston, MA, and he is a digital author for McGraw-Hill Education. He is also the Lead Professor of Anatomy and Physiology at Bunker Hill Community College, also in Boston. For the past 7 years, he has conducted digital pedagogical research under a nationally funded STEM grant. Recently, a by-line featuring the results of his research was published in the e-Campus News and e-School journals. In 2010, he was chosen as one of 50 individuals from across the world to speak in Oxford, England at their annual roundtable. The conference focus was on the impact technology is having on higher education. In 2009, he received the Private Industry Council’s “P.I.C. Achiever Award” for helping Boston Inner City High School graduates make a successful transition into college. Outside of science education, he enjoys sailing, playing chess and camping with his family in Acadia National Forrest.

ECHO Recordings: Adaptive Technologies Presentation - Gilapad Presentation

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Hype, Hyperbole, and Hope: Finding a Signal in all of the MOOC Noise
Tuesday, April 16, 2013 from 12:15pm to 1:30pm

Hype, Hyperbole, and Hope: Finding a Signal in all of the MOOC Noise [Event flyer]

Presented By: Amy Collier, PhD, Director for Technology and Teaching, Stanford University

MOOCs continue to dominate higher education headlines and board rooms, but what is the MOOC phenomenon really about? What do MOOCs mean for instructors and learners at universities and non-enrolled learners around the globe? Join Amy Collier, director for technology and teaching at Stanford, to learn what Stanford is doing with MOOCs and gain insight into lessons learned from experiments with MOOCs. Amy will discuss how online learning initiatives are shaping teaching, learning, instructional design, and faculty development in the broader higher education community. Within this ever-shifting landscape of online learning, Amy will surface concerns and opportunities for liberal arts universities working to uphold their educational missions and maintain their relevance to learners on their campuses and beyond.

Amy Collier is the director for technology and teaching in the Office of the Vice Provost for Online Learning at Stanford. She works with faculty to develop online and blended courses and leads a team of instructional designers and doctoral students who develop and iterate on designs for online learning. Before coming to Stanford, Amy was the director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Texas Wesleyan University where her team implemented nationally-recognized faculty development programs. Through her graduate studies in social sciences and nearly 10 years working faculty development, Amy has been an advocate for learners and teachers across a variety of educational institutions, from community-based service organizations to large public universities.

Amy is a member of the AERA, The Sloan Consortium, Educause Learning Initiative, and POD Network, where she is the chair of the Electronic Communication and Resources Committee. Amy frequently presents at universities and conferences, sharing her passion for topics like open learning, online learning, and faculty development.

ECHO Recording

This presentation is part of Todd Shoepe's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Examining the Pedagogy of Online Education and Technology.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.


Incorporating the Library’s Information Literacy Tutorials in Your First Year Seminar Course
Thursday, April 18, 2013 from 12:15pm to 1:30pm in UNH 3030

Incorporating the Library’s Information Literacy Tutorials in Your First Year Seminar Course [Event flyer]

Presented by:
 Elisa Slater Acosta, William H. Hannon Library
   Susan Gardner Archambault, William H. Hannon Library
   Lindsey McLean, William H. Hannon Library

Teaching a First Year Seminar course in the Fall? Worried about how to meet the information literacy requirement? This presentation will give an overview of the foundational information literacy and basic research skills first-year students need and can build on throughout the new core. Come see how to seamlessly “incorporate LMU librarians” into your First Year Seminar course through assessed online Library tutorials embedded in course Blackboard pages. This presentation will outline the content of the plug n play library tutorials as well as implementation options and possible supplemental class discussion points or activities.

ECHO Recording Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

SERS: Future Teachers’ Views of Mathematics and Intentions for Gender Equity
Monday, April 22, 2013 from 3:00pm to 4:00pm in UNH 3030

Future Teachers’ Views of Mathematics and Intentions for Gender Equity:

Are These Carried Forward into Their Own Classrooms? [Event flyer]

Presented by: Jackie Dewar, Ph.D., Mathematics

K-12 and college students, even those majoring in STEM fields, typically consider mathematics to be the study of numbers (Dewar, 2008; Forringer, 2010). In contrast, experts in the field, namely mathematics faculty, describe mathematics as being concerned with patterns, proof, abstraction and generalization (Devlin, 1994; Dewar, 2008). The views future K-12 teachers hold of the STEM disciplines they will teach, is a matter of concern to both STEM and Education faculty, since the views students hold will influence their choices about what content they teach future generations and how they approach teaching it.

A previous study (Dewar, 2008) of the outcomes of an interdisciplinary course about women and mathematics indicated that the course was successful in moving students toward a more expert view of mathematics, whereas traditional courses in the mathematics major curriculum did not. Unexpectedly, in end-of-term reflective writing future teachers taking the course volunteered they now possessed a resolve to foster gender equity in their own mathematics classrooms.

These results prompted a follow-up study of four former students now teaching in LA schools to explore whether this enriched view of mathematics or the resolve for equity had persisted, and how these influenced their classroom teaching. It also sought to determine the particular learning experiences or influences that most contributed to their views of mathematics and gender equity.

After reviewing previously reported findings on gender equity (Dewar & Vig, 2012), new results on the evolution of beginning teachers’ views of mathematics and how these views influence or are influenced by their teaching experiences will be presented. Discussion of the study and of the implications of its findings for instructors teaching STEM content, Education theory, and methods courses is invited.

ECHO Recording

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.
The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.


On Becoming Contemplatives in Action: An interdisciplinary, immersive approach
Tuesday, April 23, 2013 from 12:15pm to 1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By:   Jennifer Abe, PhD, Psychology
   Douglas Christie, PhD, Theological Studies
   Bede Healey, OSB Cam
   Students TBD

How can a course help translate an Ignatian catchphrase like "Contemplatives in Action" into the profound way of life that it represents? How does it become realized in the lives of LMU students outside the classroom? Jennifer Abe and Douglas Christie are teaching an interdisciplinary course this spring titled "Psychology, Spirituality, and Liberation." As part of the course, they invited students to spend time at a monastery and Catholic Worker community to explore this question of the relationship between contemplation and action in our lives. Br. Bede Healy, OSB Cam, Ph.D., a psychologist monk, helped students understand the richness of this relationship, as well as the meanings and rhythms of monastic life (e.g., prayer, work; solitude, community; silence, conversation) during students' extended stay in his community. Join Jennifer, Doug, Br. Bede and some of the students in this course in a conversation about translating rich immersive learning experiences into everyday life.

Brother Bede Healey, OSB Cam, PhD is a Camaldolese monk of New Camaldoli Hermitage in Big Sur. There he has served in various capacities including Formation Director, Oblate Chaplain, and Council member. He currently serves as Vice Prior and Treasurer and coordinates various other administrative responsibilities at the Hermitage. He provides spiritual direction and offers a limited retreat ministry. Bede is also a clinical psychologist. He trained and worked at the Menninger Clinic, where he was a staff psychologist, the Director of the Division of Religion and Psychiatry, and held the Ishak Ramsey professorship at the Karl Menninger School of Mental Health Sciences. In this capacity he has written and presented widely on psychological issues, disorders and treatment in religious professionals, working with religious issues in therapy, provided psychological assessments for religious and ministerial candidates, and consulted with religious communities and dioceses. He has a keen interest in the relationship between spirituality and psychology, as well as in exploring the contemplative dimension in everyday life.

ECHO Recording

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's CTE Faculty Associate Project on Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.


It Takes a Village: Embedding Information Literacy into the First-Year Experience
Monday, April 29, 2013, from 12:00pm to 1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Anne-Marie Deitering, MLS, Oregon State University

Creative and critical thinking, lifelong learning, intercultural competence, civic knowledge and engagement, and information literacy -- when it comes to our goals for our graduates, we are aiming high! None of these goals can be accomplished by one person or one program and none will happen as the result of one learning experience. Information literacy is no exception. The research shows that when it comes to information literacy, students are most successful when it is embedded campus-wide.

In this presentation we will discuss what we have learned about first-year students and their research skills. We will examine what they know about knowledge and learning, and we will identify the barriers they face navigating research assignments in their first year. And we will leave with some new ideas about how to embed these concepts throughout the first-year experience.

Anne-Marie Deitering is the Franklin McEdward Professor for Undergraduate Learning Initiatives and the Chair of the Teaching and Engagement Department at Oregon State University Libraries & Press. She has been on the steering committee for U-Engage, OSU's First Year Seminar program, since its inception. She is currently serving as the Association for Research Libraries' liaison to the National Resource Center for the First Year Experience. She speaks and writes frequently on the intersections between information literacy, emerging technologies and student success. She blogs on these topics, and more, at http://info-fetishist.org.

ECHO Recording

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.
Please do join us also if you cannot stay for the entire 90 minutes.

Other event by Anne-Marie Deitering at LMU:
Information Literacy in the Classroom: Tips and Tools

Information Literacy in the Classroom: Tips and Tools
Monday, April 29, 2013 from 4:00pm to 5:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Anne-Marie Deitering, MLS, Oregon State University

"I want to assign more research, but with the Internet, it's so easy for them to plagiarize." "You have your ways of doing things, and you just don't realize all of the resources the library has." "They don't seem to understand that just because a blog has 'scholar' in the title, it's not a scholarly journal!?!"

These are just some of the frustrations faculty express when asked about their students' information skills. Today's information landscape is complex and quick to change -- how can you possibly keep up? In this presentation we will discuss some of the conceptual barriers students face as they make the transition to college-level research, and we will generate ideas about how to address those barriers in the classroom. We will look at some real-world activities and assignments, and brainstorm some new ideas. Come prepared with your own ideas, activities and challenges.

Anne-Marie Deitering is the Franklin McEdward Professor for Undergraduate Learning Initiatives and the Chair of the Teaching and Engagement Department at Oregon State University Libraries & Press. She has been on the steering committee for U-Engage, OSU's First Year Seminar program, since its inception. She is currently serving as the Association for Research Libraries' liaison to the National Resource Center for the First Year Experience. She speaks and writes frequently on the intersections between information literacy, emerging technologies and student success. She blogs on these topics, and more, at http://info-fetishist.org.

ECHO Recording

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.
Please do join us also if you cannot stay for the entire 90 minutes.

Other event by Anne-Marie Deitering at LMU:
It Takes a Village: Embedding Information Literacy into the First Year Experience


Wine, Cheese and Chocolate Gathering - 5/2
Thursday, May 02, 2013, from 4:30pm to 5:45pm in the Marymount Institute

Event Flyer

Presented by: Vandana Thadani, Ph.D., Psychology

The Wine, Cheese, Chocolate Hour (and 15 minutes) is back! These informal gatherings are a chance to share ideas and experiences related to teaching and learning, over some delicious, calorie-rich refreshments. Several of us have goals that we’d like to achieve with students—for example, metacognition, intrinsic motivation, persistence, or deeper understanding and application of course material. All of these ideas are related to this year’s program, “Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.” For this gathering, bring any ideas about innovations you are trying (have tried) with a class that might enhance outcomes such as those listed above--or alternatively, bring goals you’d like to achieve with students that might benefit from collective brainstorming. I hope you’ll join me and our colleagues to chat, share, reconnect, eat and drink, or just absorb!

Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call x85866.

This event is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project Learning and Teaching Environments that Foster Transfer.

Jesuit Rhetorical Tradition
Monday, May 13, 2013, from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Steven Mailloux, PhD, English
                        K.J. Peters, PhD, English

This session will focus on the intellectual and spiritual principles that shape Eloquentia Perfecta the Jesuits' unique and vibrant engagement with the Rhetorical Tradition and its historic and intellectual foundations. We will discuss how Eloquentia Perfecta combines oral and written rhetoric, and in its contemporary form engages other forms of literacy and new media as well. We will also explore how Eloquentia Perfecta's intercultural dimension is contextually bound to its audiences and incorporates Ignatian pedagogical goals by integrating eloquence and critical thinking with moral discernment. - Participation in the Rhetorical Principles and Practices session in the afternoon of the same day is recommended.

Participants will receive reading material prior to this workshop.

Breakfast will be served at 8:30 am and lunch will be served at 12:30 pm. Snacks and refreshments will be provided during the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.

Rhetorical Principles and Practices
Monday, May 13, 2013, from 1:30pm to 5:00pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: K.J. Peters, English

This training session will focus on basic concepts and principles of the rhetorical arts, such as invention, genre considerations, and audience analysis. Informed by the course learning outcomes, emphasis will be placed on applying the Jesuit rhetorical principles to classroom activities and syllabus design. - Participation in the Jesuit Rhetorical Tradition session in the morning of the same day is recommended.

Lunch will be served at 12:30 pm. Snacks and refreshments will be provided during the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.

Immersion- FYS/RA Model: Greenwich Village
Tuesday, May 14, 2013, from 9:00am to 5:00pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented By: Mary Jane Treacy, Ph.D., Spanish and Women's Studies, Simmons College

This workshop allows faculty members to experience a shortened version of a highly effective and engaging pedagogy used in a large number of First-Year Seminars and other classes at other institutions. This pedagogy can be used in the form presented or with variations as the unifying experience for a First-Year Seminars or Rhetorical Arts class spanning most of the semester or for a limited number of sessions only. It involves close reading and critical analysis of primary sources, as well as careful writing and several key public speaking activities. The use of this pedagogy in the context of a First-Year Seminar will be discussed based on example syllabi.
Detailed documentation and support material will be made available during the workshops. Participants will be provided with individualized material before the workshop as preparation allowing faculty members to experience the FYS/RA model also from a student perspective. The pedagogy showcased in this module is one that can be adapted also to other classes – the module may therefore also be of interest for faculty members teaching other classes (not FYS/RA). For details about the Greenwich Village, 1913 see here.
Participation in this workshop requires attendance of both modules (morning and afternoon) on the same day. Seats in this workshop are limited - early registration recommended.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. No drop-ins. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.
Upon participation confirmation, participants will receive a copy of the material for this workshop, including a copy of the book with the course material and individualized material with instructions for the specific role each participant will assume during the workshop.

Breakfast will be served at 8:30 am; lunch and refreshments will be provided during the workshop. Lunch will be a working lunch - expect to continue discussing and developing your project during lunch around noon.

If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know at teachers@lmu.edu asap.

Interdisciplinary Course Design

Wednesday, May 15, 2013, from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated By: Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Center For Teaching Excellence

During this workshop, faculty will develop a basic syllabus for an Integrations course they intend to teach based on the course criteria with particular attention to the opportunities and challenges of an interdisciplinary course. Based on key course design principles, faculty members will develop an outline of their course satisfying the learning outcomes and defining characteristic of a LMU Integrations course. This workshop will offer the opportunity to discuss and work together with colleagues when developing the course outline. If a faculty member plans to co- or parallel-teach an Integrations course with a colleague, it is strongly recommended that all involved instructors attend the workshops.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Course Criteria
Course Application Form
Slides
Worksheets
Boix Mansilla/Dawes Duraisingh/Wolfe/Haynes - Assessment Rubric for Interdisciplinary Writing
AAC&U - Integrative Learning VALUE Rubric
Repko - Beginning the Interdisciplinary Research Process - Study Guide
Harvard GSE - Project Zero - Interdisciplinary Studies Project

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.


Integrating Information Literacy
Thursday, May 16, 2013, from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated By: Susan Gardner, MSLS, William H. Hannon Library
                        Elisa Slater Acosta, William H. Hannon Library

This workshop will introduce strategies for incorporating information literacy into classes across academic disciplines to satisfy the flag requirements. Exercises to help students learn how to find, evaluate, and reflect on information sources and online tools to support class assignments and activities will be introduced. Participants will share experiences and assignments and have hands-on time to begin to adapt the material to their disciplines and courses. Instructors will leave with a toolkit of classroom ideas, exercises, and assignments that they can incorporate into their classes, as well as contacts among LMU's librarians who will serve as a resource and as partners for the information literacy components of the new core.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

Integrating Oral Skills
Friday, May 17, 2013, from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated By: Dorothea K. Herreiner, Ph.D.

What options exist for introducing oral skills elements into a class? How can it be done such that all students are engaged and learn? Based on research, this workshop will discuss skills students typically have, lack, or seek as well as the most common obstacles of effective oral communication. During the workshop we will introduce different strategies and a range of assignments to include oral skills activities into a class that satisfy the flag requirements and are relevant for other classes, too. Through the use of rubrics, assignments, and samples, we will discuss how to effectively and consistently evaluate oral skills in class.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

Knowledge and Acknowledgement: Teaching Students to Write with (and Cite) Sources
Monday, May 20, 2013, from 1:30pm to 5:00pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

Using claims and evidence from published sources to develop new knowledge is a central feature of academic work. Students often struggle with this aspect of academic writing; they find the differing requirements for source use, the practices of citation, and the relationships between claim and evidence hard to navigate as they move from one discipline to another throughout their undergraduate career. Drawing from recent research in writing pedagogy, this workshop will discuss how to teach students to write with sources in ways that help them both to understand the methods of argument and knowledge-making in different disciplines, and to better understand the requirements of academic integrity.

Suzanne Lane is Acting Director of Writing Across the Curriculum in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies, and directs the Writing Advisor program in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Dr. Lane has taught Writing at Harvard University, and American and African American Literature at Boston University and California State University, San Bernardino. Dr. Lane’s research focuses on rhetorical and narrative theory, as well as on student writing development. As a researcher on the Harvard Study of Undergraduate Writing, Dr. Lane investigated how students learn the rhetorical cultures and conventions of different disciplines across the curriculum. In her current book project, Dr. Lane analyzes the rhetoric of slave narratives, academic histories, and historical novels of slavery. Parts of this work have been published in African American Review.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Lunch will be provided at 12:30pm. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.

Integrating Writing and Speaking to Foster Critical Thinking and Engaged Learning
Tuesday, May 21, 2013 from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Suzanne Lane, PhD, Director, Writing Across the Curriculum, MIT

We often think of essays and oral presentations as separate and discreet assignments, but both writing and speaking can help students to conceptualize and clarify their ideas. This workshop will provide a framework for instructors to think through rhetorical issues of audience, invention, arrangement, articulation, and performance that shape both oral and written assignments. By considering the different ways that written and oral assignments lead students to deepen their understanding, and shape their knowledge for an audience, we can determine when to assign each mode, and how to integrate them for more effective learning.

Suzanne Lane is Acting Director of Writing Across the Curriculum in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies, and directs the Writing Advisor program in the Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences. Dr. Lane has taught Writing at Harvard University, and American and African American Literature at Boston University and California State University, San Bernardino. Dr. Lane’s research focuses on rhetorical and narrative theory, as well as on student writing development. As a researcher on the Harvard Study of Undergraduate Writing, Dr. Lane investigated how students learn the rhetorical cultures and conventions of different disciplines across the curriculum. In her current book project, Dr. Lane analyzes the rhetoric of slave narratives, academic histories, and historical novels of slavery. Parts of this work have been published in African American Review.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.
Core Course Design
Wednesday, May 22, 2013 from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated by: Dorothea K. Herreiner, Ph.D.

During this workshop, faculty will develop a basic syllabus for their core course based on the LMU course criteria by modifying an existing syllabus or developing a new one. This workshop will rely on key course design principles to develop course elements addressing learning outcomes for the respective courses. This workshop will offer the opportunity to discuss and work together with colleagues when developing the course outline.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Breakfast will be available at 8:30am. Lunch will be provided at the end of the workshop. If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know.

Please direct all questions and RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.