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Spring 2012

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

Semesters:  [Fall 2014]    [Spring 2014]    [Fall 2013]    [Spring 2013]    [Fall 2012]    [Spring 2012]    [Fall 2011]

Date Event Speaker(s)/Presenter(s)
1/17/12
Stereotype Threat: An Examination of How Stereotypes Can Impede the Performance of Our Students
Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
1/20/12
QQSW: Words vs. Numbers: Dealing with Qualitative Data
Jackie Dewar, PhD, Mathematics
1/23/12
SERS: Why I Do Physics Education Research
Vince Coletta, PhD, Physics
2/7/12
Creativity by Constraint
Tom Klein, MFA, Animation
2/9/12
Engaging Students through Reflection: Examples from LMU Classrooms
Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
Jeremy McCallum, PhD, Chemistry & Biochemistry
2/10/12
CBL Group: Grading Reflections
2/14/12
Teaching Questions: Teaching Based on Skills and Topics from other Disciplines and Classes

2/16/12
Evidence to Action: Making Informed Changes to Improve Student Learning
Laura Massa, PhD, Director, Office of Assessment
2/17/12
QQSW: Statistics as Principled Argument II: More Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
David Hardy, PhD, Psychology
 
2/20/12
SERS: An Investigation of the Relationship of Mathematical Tasks and Interactional Sequences During Seatwork
Ana Serrano, PhD, Elementary and Secondary Education
 
2/21/12
Framing Students’ Cognitive “Job” through Classroom Instruction
Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology
 
3/6/12
Student Engagement and Reflective Learning: Wine and Cheese Get-Together

 
3/8/12
Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People to Fill Out Your Survey
Christine Chavez, MA, Office of Assessment
3/15/12
Mapping & Measuring: 1 Workshop, 2 Tools for Improving Learning
Laura Massa, PhD, Director, Office of Assessment
3/16/12
QQSW: Introduction to Statistical Tests
Andrew Healy, PhD, Economics
3/19/12
SERS: Female and Male Competition Attitudes, Performance, and Stress
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
 
3/22/12
Online Learning: The Future?
Beth Brewer, EdD, CAST Program
Ernesto Colín, PhD, Specialized Programs in Urban Education
Edmundo Litton, EdD, Specialized Programs in Urban Education
Philip Molebash, PhD, Specialized Programs in Urban Education
Ana Serrano, PhD, Elementary and Secondary Education
Todd Shoepe, MS, Health and Human Sciences
3/26/12
Become an Expert Learner: Metacognition is the Key! 
Saundra McGuire, PhD, Louisiana State University
3/26/12
Teach STEM Students How to Learn: Metacognition is the Key!
Saundra McGuire, PhD, Louisiana State University
3/27/12  Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is the Key! Saundra McGuire, PhD, Louisiana State University 
4/10/12  Reducing the Effect of Stereotype Threat on Achievement: Classroom Interventions Dustin Thomas, PhD, California State University, Long Beach 
4/12/12  Unleashing the Power of Rubrics  Laura Massa, PhD, Director, Office of Assessment 
4/13/12  QQSW: ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, MANOVAs David Hardy, PhD, Psychology 
4/19/12  Conjuring the Desert: Rick and Reflection in the Classroom Doug Burton-Christie, PhD, Theological Studies
Ruben Martinez, PhD, English 
4/23/12  Beyond Math and Science: The Role of Applied Engineering and Information Technology Courses in the High School Curriculum Michael Gottfried, PhD, Specialized Programs in Urban Education  
4/25/12  Does Stereotype Threat Affect Faculty? A Conversation Cheryl Grills, PhD, Psychology 
5/1/12  Student Engagement and Reflective Learning: Wine and Cheese Get-Together  
5/4/12  Four-Unit Curriculum Discussion   
5/7/12 Immersion - FYS Model: The Trial of Galileo  Tony Crider, PhD, Physics, Elon College 
5/9/12  FYS Course Development Workshop Steve Mailloux, PhD, English
KJ Peters, PhD, English
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
5/9/12  Teaching Reading Workshop Monika Hogan, PhD, English, Pasadena City College 
5/10/12  Immersion - FYS Model: The Threshold of Democracy  Thaddeus Russell, PhD, Occidental College 
5/14/12  Course Development Workshop (Foundations and Explorations)   
5/14/12  Teaching Writing Workshop KJ Peters, PhD, English 
5/15/12 Teaching Information Literacy Workshop
5/15/12 Teaching Oral Communication Workshop Therese Edwards, MA, Communication Studies
Emily Ravenscroft, PhD, Communication Studies
Michele Hammers, JD, Communication Studies
Wenshu Lee, PhD, Communication Studies
Philip Wander, PhD, Communication Studies

Stereotype Threat: An Examination of How Stereotypes Can Impede the Performance of Our Students
Tuesday, January 17, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Stereotype Threat: An Examination of How Stereotypes Can Impede the Performance of Our Students (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Adam Fingerhut, Ph.D.
Psychology Department, Loyola Marymount University

The fear of being judged through the lens of a negative stereotype can contribute to a significantly weaker academic performance of our students based on their race, gender, or other traits -- even when faculty are not directly invoking stereotypes. In this talk, I will present an overview of the surprising phenomenon of "stereotype threat" and the unusual ways in which it may manifest itself, in a variety of fields and activities. Understanding this phenomenon will allow us to become better teachers and to bring out the best in our students. Additionally, I will explore theoretical and empirical work detailing potential mechanisms underlying the stereotype threat phenomenon and discuss newer research, indicating the idea that stereotype threat may be comprised of multiple levels. Finally, I will present some data demonstrating that not every member of a given social category is equally susceptible to threat; I will do this as a way to suggest that there are certain individuals who we should most be aware of in our interventions.

[Presentation Slides (pdf)]
[Video Recording of Presentation]

References
  • Shapiro, J. R., & Neuberg, S. L. (2007). From stereotype threat to stereotype threats: Implications of a multi-threat framework for causes, moderators, mediators, consequences and interventions. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 11, 107-130.
  • Schmader, T., Johns, M., & Forbes, C. (2008). An integrated process model of stereotype threat effects on performance. Psychological Review, 115, 336-356.
  • Steele, C. M., & Aronson, J. (1995). Stereotype threat and the intellectual test performance of African Americans. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 797-811.
  • Steele, C. M. (1997). A threat in the air: How stereotypes shape intellectual identity and performance. American Psychologist, 52, 613-629.
  • http://reducingstereotypethreat.org/
This event is part of Lily Khadjavi's Faculty Associate project on Increasing Diversity: Addressing Stereotype Threat.

QQSW: Words vs. Numbers: Dealing with Qualitative Data
Friday, January 20, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM in UNH 3030

Words vs. Numbers: Dealing with Qualitative Data (Event Flyer)

Presented By: Jackie Dewar, Ph.D.
Mathematics Department, Loyola Marymount University

[Video Recording]

This workshop will begin with a brief discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of qualitative and quantitative data as evidence in scholarly studies of student learning. Two approaches to analyzing (coding) qualitative data will be presented and participants will engage in coding a data set during the workshop. Concepts such as inter-rater reliability and predetermined and emergent categories will be described in simple terms. The goal is for participants to leave with basic knowledge, accessible resources, and increased confidence in their ability to draw and justify conclusions from qualitative data.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.

This event is part of the Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW) series.
SERS: Why I Do Physics Education Research
Monday, January 23, 2012, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

STEM Education Research Seminar (SERS): Why I Do Physics Education Research (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Vince Coletta, Ph.D.
Physics Department, Loyola Marymount University

ECHO Recording of Presentation

In this seminar I will share experiences that have motivated my research in physics education. I will describe the initial research question that arose out of my teaching and how the answer to that question led to other intriguing questions that continue to motivate me today. Can we develop a students’ ability to reason? Can we change a student’s understanding of what it means to learn? In what way does gender affect a student’s work?

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

This is a brown-bag seminar - bring your own lunch (microwave available). Water, coffee and cookies provided by CTE.


Creativity by Constraint
Tuesday, February 7, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Creativity by Constraint (Event Flyer)

ECHO Recording of Presentation

Presented by: Tom Klein, MFA
Animation Department, Loyola Marymount University
Presentation Slides (pdf)

Student approaches to creative work can be very derivative and this is possibly enabled by instructors offering assignments that are open-ended, such as "Propose a story for your film." An alternate approach is to make categories that introduce constraints, that make the creative approach more difficult and challenging, which in turn can yield surprises and innovations. This presentation will offer some practical insights into this method of inspiring students toward originality and away from ordinary.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.


Engaging Students through Reflection: Examples from LMU Classrooms
Thursday, February 9, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Engaging Students through Reflection: Examples from LMU Classrooms (Event Flyer)

ECHO Recording of Presentation

Presented by:
Adam Fingerhut, Ph.D.
Psychology Department, Loyola Marymount University

Jeremy McCallum, Ph.D.
Chemistry & Biochemistry Department, Loyola Marymount University
Presentation Slides (pdf)

Links to documents discussed:
Designing Effective Questions
There Is Such a Thing as a Stupid Question (PDF version available upon request)
Social Identity Exercise
The Self Exercise

Reflection is a cornerstone of learning and a critical component of effective learning environments.  It is a means of building engagement, of supporting students to take control of their current and future learning, and simply of helping students become better learners.  In this presentation, two LMU faculty members, Prof. Adam Fingerhut (Psychology) and Prof. Jeremy McCallum (Chemistry & Biochemistry) will describe their very different approaches to encouraging student reflection in their courses.  This event continues the series in the Student Engagement and Reflective Learning Program. Through presentation and informal discussion, we will explore the wide variety ways in which we can support student reflection—ranging from informal, in-class discussions through reflection scaffolded through technology.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.


CBL Group: Grading Reflections
Friday, February 10, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM in UNH 3030

Discussion of approaches to and experiences with grading reflections.

If you are willing to share your reflections, rubrics, and/or policies for grading reflections, please send them to us ahead of the meeting at teachers@lmu.edu, or bring them along.

We hope that everybody interested in or already teaching CBL courses will join us for the discussion.

Cookies, coffee, and water provided. 

If you wish to be added to or deleted from our CBL email list, please let us know at at teachers@lmu.edu.


Teaching Questions: Teaching Based on Skills and Topics from other Disciplines and Classes
Tuesday, February 14, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM in UNH 3030

Teaching Questions: Teaching Based on Skills and Topics from other Disciplines and Classes

We will explore to what extent and on what topics we rely on skills and topics taught in other disciplines and classes, how we integrate such units in our teaching, what conversations we have with our colleagues, how we coordinate, etc. We will consider best practices and discuss opportunities for exchange and coordination at LMU.

If you have any assignments, handouts, or other material that you use to cover skills and topics from other disciplines in your classes, please send them to us ahead of the meeting at teachers@lmu.edu, or bring them along.

Cookies, coffee, and water provided. 

If you wish to be added to or deleted from our SoTL/Teaching Questions email list, please let us know at at teachers@lmu.edu.


Evidence to Action: Making Informed Changes to Improve Student Learning
Thursday, February 16, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Evidence to Action: Making Informed Changes to Improve Student Learning (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Laura Massa, Ph.D.
Office of Assessment, Loyola Marymount University
ECHO Recording of Presentation

As an educator, you are constantly observing the effects of your approaches in the classroom, taking note of what works and what doesn’t, and adjusting your methods accordingly. This workshop will show you how to apply this model for improvement in a strategic way at the program level – to use evidence from student work and surveys to make effective modifications within a realistic timeframe.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or call (310) 258-2628.
Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/assessment.


QQSW: Statistics as Principled Argument II: More Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
Friday, February 17, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM in UNH 3030

Statistics as Principled Argument II: More Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
(Event Flyer)

Presented by: David Hardy, Ph.D.
Psychology Department, Loyola Marymount University

This workshop will provide instruction on database management, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics (hypothesis testing). We will be using SPSS, a popular statistical software program. Instruction on SPSS will be integrated with an overarching conceptual theme that statistics can help you make (or criticize) more strongly an argument. Descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency and variability will be briefly covered. Inferential statistics will also be introduced, where hypotheses can be tested and arguments can be made (or not!). Academic performance in LMU students will be examined to illustrate these procedures and rhetorical strategies. Handouts will be provided along with demonstration exercises.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.

This event is part of the Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW) series.


SERS: An Investigation of the Relationship of Mathematical Tasks and Interactional Sequences During Seatwork
Monday, February 20, 2012, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

STEM Education Research Seminar (SERS): An Investigation of the Relationship of Mathematical Tasks and Interactional Sequences During Seatwork (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Ana Serrano, Ph.D.
Elementary and Secondary Education Department, Loyola Marymount University
ECHO Recording of Presentation

To investigate the opportunities for eighth-grade students to communicate their ways of thinking during seatwork, we examined how tasks influenced classroom discourse. The goal was to examine how tasks (a) influenced interactional exchanges between teacher and student(s) during seatwork; and (b) provided opportunities for assistance and learning. The data included five lessons each from Germany, Japan, and the United States that contained at least one seatwork segment. Findings indicated that the more open-ended tasks led to more thought-generating interactions that were characterized by a greater degree of co-participatory organizational structure, struggle, and negotiation.

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

This is a brown-bag seminar - bring your own lunch (microwave available). Water, coffee and cookies provided by CTE.


Framing Students’ Cognitive “Job” through Classroom Instruction
Tuesday, February 21, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Framing Students' Cognitive "Job" through Classroom Instruction (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Vandana Thadani, Ph.D.
Psychology Department, Loyola Marymount University
Presentation Slides
ECHO Recording of Presentation

Researchers, reformers, and educators widely recognize the critical role that teaching plays in student learning—but what qualities of teaching really matter? In this talk, I’ll describe quantitative measures of teaching practices that I have developed. The measures (called “teacher tasks and questions” or “TTQs” capture the nuances of suggestions, tasks, questions, and instructions that instructors use—and then categorize the cognitive and learning strategies they elicit from students. My hypothesis is that TTQs are important to student learning because they shape the cognitive and learning strategies that students use; specifically, they can frame students’ cognitive “job” during lessons as involving the reproduction of information, reasoning, note-taking, thinking reflectively (metacognitively), thinking strategically, or all of the above. Research has shown that students’ cognitive strategies play an important role in learning. In this talk, we will discuss the implications of this work for intentionally ratcheting up the cognitive and learning strategies students use in our classes.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.
Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/cte and like us on Facebook.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.


Student Engagement and Reflective Learning: Wine and Cheese Get-Together
Tuesday, March 6, 2012, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in UNH 3030

Student Engagement and Reflective Learning: Wine and Cheese Get-Together (Event Flyer)

Come to the third in a series of wine and cheese get-togethers for connecting with colleagues around the topics of teaching and learning. What goals do we have for student learning, and what challenges do we face in achieving them? What pedagogical strategies have we each developed that help us teach a particularly difficult concept, build the classroom culture we want, stimulate discussion, change our students’ capacity to learn, etc.? Through informal discussions, we’ll share successes, strategies, challenges, and barriers related to issues and questions like those above. The last few events were a low-key, lovely chance to sit and chat (over well-selected eats & drinks) about things we experience in our courses, but don't always have a chance to discuss with our peers. Join your colleagues to chat, reconnect, eat and drink, or just absorb.

Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.
Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/cte and like us on Facebook.

This event is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.


Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People to Fill Out Your Survey
Thursday, March 8, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People to Fill Out Your Survey (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Christine Chavez, M.A.
Office of Assessment, Loyola Marymount University
ECHO Recording of Presentation

Are you struggling to get more people to fill out your surveys? Many factors can influence a person’s decision to participate in a survey, but with careful consideration you can develop an effective strategy for increasing responses to your survey. In this workshop, you will learn how key decisions on survey design and administration can impact the number of responses you receive. We will also discuss why the number of responses is important and provide you with practical yet effective techniques for getting more people to participate in your survey.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to surveys@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-6691.
Visit us on the web.


Mapping & Measuring: 1 Workshop, 2 Tools for Improving Learning
Thursday, March 15, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Mapping & Measuring: 1 Workshop, 2 Tools for Improving Learning (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Laura Massa, Ph.D.
Office of Assessment, Loyola Marymount University
ECHO Recording of Presentation

Understanding both how and how well your students learn is a key step toward improving learning. In this workshop we’ll cover two tools to help you do just that:

1. Mapping: maps help you understand the experiences that contribute to student learning in your program.
2. Measuring: there are many ways to measure learning. We’ll review properties of good measurement techniques and provide an overview of the different types of measures.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or call (310) 258-2628.
Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/assessment.


QQSW: Introduction to Statistical Tests
Friday, March 16, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM in UNH 3030

Introduction to Statistical Tests (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Andrew Healy, Ph.D.
Economics Department, Loyola Marymount University

We will discuss how to conduct a range of simple statistical tests. We will start by considering the methods needed to compare means from different samples. Methods that will be covered include Fisher´s exact tests, t-tests, Mann-Whitney tests, and rank-sum tests. We will also demonstrate how computer software can be used to conduct these tests. If time permits, we will cover linear regression, as well.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.

This event is part of the Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW) series.


SERS: Female and Male Competition Attitudes, Performance, and Stress
Monday, March 19, 2012, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

STEM Education Research Seminar (SERS):
Female and Male Competition Attitudes, Performance, and Stress (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Dorothea K Herreiner, Ph.D.
Director, Center for Teaching Excellence
Economics Department, Loyola Marymount University

Recent research has shown that there are significant differences between the competition attitudes of males and females. Men choose competition too frequently whereas women choose it too little. Such differences in competition attitudes are likely to contribute to the observed differences in job, career, major, and even class choices. Self-reported stress has been found to be related to the differential competition attitudes helping predict competition choices. The perceived stress of activities can therefore contribute to gender differences in academic and career choices. The design of tasks can determine the competition choices of males and females.
In addition to discussing these results and their relevance for our teaching, in particular, but not only the STEM fields, I hope to get input from the group about how we can address these issues in our teaching and where we can investigate further the relationship between competition attitudes, performance, stress, and academic choices.

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

This is a brown-bag seminar - bring your own lunch (microwave available). Water, coffee and cookies provided by CTE.


Online Learning: The Future?
Thursday, March 22, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Moderated Panel Discussion: Online Learning: The Future? (Event Flyer)

Video Recording of Presentation

Technology has become a powerful tool for the creation of new ways of teaching and learning. In recent years, there have been discussions on the use of on-line tools to deliver course instruction. Universities that offer courses on-line are now able to attract students from all over the world and are able to expand their course offerings. Creating on-line courses can also help a university overcome barriers to growth such as the lack of classroom facilities. Teaching on-line can encourage faculty members to be more creative in their courses so that teaching and learning goes beyond lectures and demonstration.

Despite the success of on-line or blended courses (where both face to face and on-line technologies are used), many faculty members are hesitant to teach on-line because of the perceived obstacles such as the lack of experience or technology expertise. In this panel discussion, a group of professors who have taught on-line or blended courses will share their experiences and lessons learned with on-line course design, assessment, developing interpersonal relationships with students, and effective pedagogical tools.

Panel:


Beth Brewer, Ed.D., is the Director of Catholic Teacher Preparation and the Catholic Archdiocesan School Teachers (CAST) Program. CAST is a blended learning program in which each course employs face-to-face and online learning. In addition to teaching blended courses in the CAST program for six years, her dissertation research focused on the usefulness of technology in helping students learn.

Ernesto Colin, Ph.D., is a faculty member in the Department of Specialized Programs in Urban Education. He has taught three different blended (hybrid) courses in the SOE and is currently teaching one completely online course. He is on the Academic Technology Committee of the SOE and the task force for Online Learning in the SOE.

Edmundo Litton, Ed.D., is a faculty member in the Department of Specialized Programs in Urban Education. He completed a graduate degree in Educational Technology and pioneered the use of blended programs in the School of Education.

Philip Molebash, Ph.D., has over 15 years experience designing K-12 and teacher education curriculum for online and blended delivery. He is currently exploring innovative uses of Google Apps to support online learning, particularly collaborative writing using Google Docs. He is also currently collaborating with Edmundo Litton on the design and development of SOE’s forthcoming online Masters in Urban Education.

Ana Serrano, Ph.D., is a faculty member in the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and started teaching online courses in Spring 2010. She has taught more than 10 courses completely on-line.

Todd Shoepe, M.S., is a Clinical Professor with instructional responsibilities in anatomy, physiology, nutrition, and exercise physiology within the Department of health and Human Sciences while also serving as a digital products consultant to McGaw-Hill Publishing. He has promoted blended learning environments in all levels of instruction during his 14 years in higher education.

Lunch
will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.

Suggested Readings:
Brug, J., Oenema, A., & Campbell, M. (2003).  Past, present, and future of computer tailored nutrition education.  American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 77, 1028S-1039S.

Clark-Ibanez, M. & Scott, L. (2008).  Learning to teach on-line.   Teaching Sociology 36(1), 34-41.

Hill, C. (n.d.), 10 principles of effective on-line teaching: Best practices in distance education. Distance Education Report. Madison, WI: Magna Publications.

Ocak, M. A. (2011). Why are faculty members not teaching blended courses?  Insights from faculty members. Computers and Education 56, 689-699.

McFarlin, B. K. (2008). Hybrid lecture on-line format increases student grades in an undergraduate exercise physiology course at a large urban university. Advances in Physiology Education 32, 86-91.

Tallent-Runnels, M. K., Thomas, J. A., Lan, W. Y, Cooper, S., Ahern, T. C., Shaw, S. M. & Liu, X. (2006). Teaching courses on-line: A review of the research.  Review of Educational Research 76(1) , 93-135.

Ruiz, J. G., Mintzer, M. J., Leipzig, R. M. (2006) The impact of e-learning on medical education. Academic Medicine 81(3), 207-212.

Student Project Samples and On-Line Resources:

Student Project: Understanding Hip Surgery

Student Project: Guide to Stress

This infographic, created by knewton.com and Column Five Media, presents a quick look at today’s increasingly popular digital media.

Provided by Quirk Education, this visual offers a glimpse of how online learning had developed over the last two decades and its role in school marketing.

Online PhD Programs use this infographic to demonstrate student preparedness based on face to face vs online courses. 

Quality Matters is a faculty-centered, peer review process that is designed to certify the quality of online and blended courses.

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast.  By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, video taped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited.  The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.


Become an Expert Learner: Metacognition is the Key!

Monday, March 26, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM in UNH 3030

The Center for Teaching Excellence presents a
Learning Strategies Seminar for ALL LMU STUDENTS

Become an Expert Learner: Metacognition is the Key! (Event Flyer)

 
Presented by:   Saundra McGuire, Ph.D., Louisiana State University (Bio)
  Assistant Vice Chancellor for Learning, Teaching, and Retention
  Professor of Chemistry




Presentation Slides (PDF)


Most students who enter college have done quite well in high school by effectively memorizing information. However, many do not have effective learning strategies that will enable them to make the A's they are capable of making at the university level. This interactive workshop will teach students cognitive learning strategies that will help them achieve meaningful, transferable learning, enabling them to ace exams, make A's in challenging courses, and excel in their careers.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866
Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/cte and like is in Facebook


Teach STEM Students How to Learn: Metacognition is the Key!
Monday, March 26, 2012, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in UNH 3030

Teach STEM Students How to Learn: Metacognition is the Key! (Event Flyer)

Presented by:   Saundra McGuire, Ph.D., Louisiana State University (Bio)
  Assistant Vice Chancellor for Learning, Teaching, and Retention
  Professor of Chemistry

 



Presentation Slides (PDF)

Presentation Slides (PPT)

All STEM students who attend LMU have the ability to succeed in STEM courses. However, most do not have effective learning strategies, and resort to memorizing information just before tests. This interactive workshop will introduce faculty to cognitive science research-based learning strategies that will help all students experience meaningful, transferable learning. The session will focus on ways to teach STEM students simple, yet powerful learning strategies to ensure success in STEM courses.

Co-sponsored by:   Joseph Hellige, Ph.D., SVP/CAO 
  Richard Plumb, Ph.D., Dean, Seaver College of Science and Engineering
  Rae Linda Brown, Ph.D., Vice President, Undergraduate Education
  Abbie Robinson-Armstrong, Ph.D., Vice President, Intercultural Affairs

   



This presentation will focus in particular on STEM fields. It is open to ALL faculty and staff. Our main event will be held Tuesday 3/27, convo hour. For more information on this and other events at the CTE, visit our Calendar Page.

A reception will follow. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, video taped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.


Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is the Key!
Tuesday, March 27, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Get Students to Focus on Learning Instead of Grades: Metacognition is the Key! (Event Flyer)

Presented by:   Saundra McGuire, Ph.D., Louisiana State University (Bio)
  Assistant Vice Chancellor for Learning, Teaching, and Retention
  Professor of Chemistry

 



ECHO Recording of Presentation

Video Recording of Presentation
Presentation Slides (PDF)
Presentation Slides (PPT)

Today’s students enter universities with widely varying academic skills, interests, and motivation levels.  Faculty often lament that students are focused on achieving high grades, but do not want to spend time learning.  Most students think that memorizing information before an examination is tantamount to learning the material, and spend considerably less time studying than is commensurate with their grade expectations.  This interactive workshop will introduce participants to cognitive science findings that can be used to improve teaching and learning, and will provide a variety of strategies that can be used to help all students experience meaningful, transferable learning.

Co-sponsored by:   Joseph Hellige, Ph.D., SVP/CAO 
  Richard Plumb, Ph.D., Dean, Seaver College of Science and Engineering
  Rae Linda Brown, Ph.D., Vice President, Undergraduate Education
  Abbie Robinson-Armstrong, Ph.D., Vice President, Intercultural Affairs

 

 



Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, video taped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.


Reducing the Effect of Stereotype Threat on Achievement: Classroom Interventions
Tuesday, April 10, 2012, from 12: 15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Reducing the Effect of Stereotype Threat on Achievement: Classroom Interventions (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Dustin Thoman, Ph.D., Psychology, California State University, Long Beach

Video Recording of Presentation
Handout of Presentation Slides (PDF)
Strategies for Classroom Interventions (PDF)

Educators becoming aware of research on stereotype threat are motivated to understand what can be done to ameliorate the influence of stereotypes on student achievement. Although there is no "magic bullet" for closing achievement gaps, psychology researchers have designed and implemented a number of successful stereotype threat interventions with promising results. These interventions work by targeting psychological variables that have been implicated in stereotype threat processes, demonstrating that subtle theory-driven interventions can produce big effects. This talk describes properties of successful interventions, provides details for four types of successful interventions, demonstrates how to use these interventions, and discusses pros and cons for implementing each type of interventions in college classrooms. Attendees will leave with concrete ideas for their own classes.

References
  • Aronson, J., Fried, C.B., Good, C. (2001). Reducing the effects of stereotype threat on African American college students by shaping theories of intelligence. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 38, 113–125
  • Cohen, G.L., Garcia, J., Apfel, N., Master, A. (2006). Reducing the racial achievement gap: A social-psychological intervention. Science, 313, 1307-1310.
  • Hong, H.-Y., & Lin-Siegler, X., (2011). How learning about scientists' struggles influences students' interest and learning in physics. Journal of Educational Psychology, Advance online publication.
  • Walton, G.M., & Cohen, G.L., (2011). A brief social-belonging intervention improves academic and health outcomes of minority students. Science, 331, 1447-1451.
Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.

This presentation is part of Lily Khadjavi's Faculty Associate project on Increasing Diversity: Addressing Stereotype Threat.

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, videotaped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.

Unleashing the Power of Rubrics
Thursday, April 12, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Unleashing the Power of Rubrics (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Laura Massa, Ph.D., Office of Assessment

Rubrics are a powerful tool that can help you understand and promote student learning while saving you time. Unleashing the Power of Rubrics will present a 5-step process for creating rubrics, share ideas for how to enhance student learning with rubrics, and provide tips for speedily and successfully capturing what your students have learned.

As part of the workshop, participants will be given time to begin building a rubric. Bring along a description of an assignment so you can get started on your own rubric.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or call (310) 258-2628.
Visit us on the web at http://academics.lmu.edu/spee/officeofassessment/.

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, video taped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.

QQSW: ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, MANOVAs
Friday, April 13, 2012, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM in UNH 3030

Presented by: David Hardy, Ph.D., Psychology

This workshop will focus on ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, and MANOVAs, as well as on writing up summary statistics. Bring your own data set and ask questions.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This event is part of the Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW) series. 

Conjuring the Desert: Risk and Reflection in the Classroom
Thursday, April 19, 2012, from 12:15 PM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Conjuring the Desert: Risk and Reflection in the Classroom (Event Flyer)

Presented by:

Doug Burton-Christie, Ph.D., Theological Studies

Rubén Martinez, Ph.D., English 

ECHO Recording of Presentation
Into the Desert Handout 1
Into the Desert Handout 2
Into the Desert Handout 3

How do we open up a space for reflection with our students that helps them to do their best, most thoughtful work; to risk engaging themselves and the material of the course as fully and courageously as possible? What does that space look like, feel like? How do you enter it? How does it affect your thinking, your sense of self, your relationship to the world around you? These questions among others, have formed a central part of a team-taught course on the desert taught by Ruben Martinez (English) and Douglas Burton-Christie (Theological Studies). Students are invited to enter the desert--imaginatively (through sustained engagement with the politically and culturally charged borderlands of the American Southwest and with the contemplative traditions of the ancient Egyptian monks) and concretely (through an extended trip to the Mojave)--and to think about how entering the space of the desert can help them engage the most serious questions of their lives with greater openness and honesty. It is in this sense that the contemplative work of the course opens out onto and informs fundamental questions of ethical engagement and practice, something that connects our work with the core mission of LMU.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, videotaped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.


Beyond Math and Science: The Role of Applied Engineering and Information Technology Courses in the High School Curriculum
Monday, April 23, 2012, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

Beyond Math and Science: The Role of Applied Engineering and Information Technology Courses in the High School Curriculum (Event Flyer)

Presented by: Michael Gottfried, Ph.D.
Specialized Programs in Urban Education Department, Loyola Marymount University

ECHO Recording of Presentation

A well-trained scientific workforce is essential to the nation's economic vitality. Currently, policy makers, educators, and business leaders are deeply concerned about the quantity and quality of American youth in line to pursue careers in science and engineering. In consequence, there has been an increased pressure on the education system to take a more proactive approach in preparing youth for careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. To this end, schools generally offer two types of STEM courses: academic and applied. Academic STEM courses include math and science courses that comprise the traditional academic curriculum, such as algebra, geometry, calculus, biology, chemistry, and physics. Applied STEM courses, on the other hand, stress the application of academic concepts to "real world" job experiences while incorporating quantitative skills, logic, and problem solving. There are two main strands of applied STEM in the high school curriculum: computer/information sciences courses and engineering technologies courses. This study examines relative merits of taking applied STEM courses in high school in preparing youth for careers in STEM fields. Specifically, this project makes use data from the recently collected Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 to assess whether applied courses influence math achievement in high school, STEM fields of study (for college enrollees), and jobs with STEM applications (for non-college youth).

This talk is part of the STEM Education Research Seminar series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The STEM Education Research Seminar is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

This is a brown-bag seminar - bring your own lunch (microwave available).

Does Stereotype Threat Affect Faculty? A Conversation
Wednesday, April 25, 2012, from 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Does Stereotype Threat Affect Faculty? A Conversation over Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate. (Event Flyer)

Moderated by: Cheryl Grills, PhD, Psychology 
  Associate Dean, BCLA

Much attention to stereotype threat has been focused on its effect on students, on test scores and other measures of performance. We, as faculty members, as teachers and researchers, may also be affected by stereotype threat.
Come and join a conversation about how we and our colleagues are impacted by implicit and explicit stereotypes, in the classrooms and in our careers. We will share stories and experiences to understand what we are facing at LMU, to discuss how we can address it and what support structures may be needed, both on an individual and an institutional basis.

Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.

Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/cte and like us on Facebook.

This event is part of Lily Khadjavi's Faculty Associate project on Increasing Diversity: Addressing Stereotype Threat.


Student Engagement and Reflective Learning: Wine and Cheese Get-Together
Tuesday, May 1, 2012, from 4:00 PM to 5:30 PM in the Marymount Institute

Student Engagement and Reflective Learning: Wine and Cheese Get-Together (Event Flyer)

Come to the last wine and cheese get-together in the Student Engagement and Reflective Learning series. This is our last opportunity this semester to connect with colleagues around the topics of teaching and learning. Through informal discussions, we’ll share successes, strategies, challenges, and barriers related to student engagement, metacognition, reflection, self-regulated learning, and classroom teaching, and any other topic that interests people. I'd also love to take the opportunity to gather your suggestions, ideas, and requests as I plan this next year of faculty associate programming. The last few events were a low-key, lovely chance to sit and chat (over well-selected eats & drinks!) about things we experience in our courses, but don't always have a chance to discuss with our peers. Please join me and other colleagues to chat, reconnect, eat and drink, or just absorb.

Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or call (310) 338-5866.
Visit us on the web at www.lmu.edu/cte and like us on Facebook.

This event is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.

Four-Unit Curriculum Discussion
Friday, May 4, 2012, from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM in UNH 3030

Four-Unit Curriculum Discussion (Event Flyer) During this university-wide faculty discussion of the four-unit proposal, we will have the opportunity to hear each others' thoughts, suggestions, and concerns about the four-unit curriculum proposal. The purpose of this discussion is to listen to each other and understand the different points of view as well as to bring as much evidence as possible into the discussion. 

We will start with a short description of several key positions in the debate as well as evidence from LMU and other institutions and then continue with a discussion among all participants. The following short presentations have been confirmed:
  • Richard Fox, Political Science, Implementation and Experience in Political Science [Presentation Slides]
  • Mike Manoogian, Civil Engineering, Engineering Perspective [Presentation Slides]
We welcome short position papers or handouts in preparation of or at the meeting and will post them here on the event page, as well as any background reading or evidence you may be aware of. Please send us any such material asap so that we can include it here.

Several members of the Joint Task Force on Provisional Planning for a 4-Unit Model will be attending.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866. 

This program will be video and audio taped and may be podcast. By your willing participation in the program, you expressly and irrevocably consent to be photographed, videotaped and/or audio taped and quoted/cited. The films, tapes, and other digital recordings will become the property of the Center of Teaching Excellence, LMU.

Immersion - FYS Model: The Trial of Galileo
Monday, May 7, 2012, from 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

The Trial of Galileo: Aristotelianism, the "New Cosmology," and the Catholic Church, 1616-33

Presented By: Tony Crider, PhD, Physics, Elon College.

Schedule.

Instructions and other material are being sent to each participant.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. No drop-ins. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Upon participation confirmation, participants will receive a copy of the material for this workshop, including a copy of the book with the course material and individualized material with instructions for the specific role each participant will assume during the workshop.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided during the workshop. Lunch will be a working lunch - expect to continue discussing and developing your project over lunch.

If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know at teachers@lmu.edu asap.

This immersion workshop allows faculty members to experience a shortened version of a highly effective and engaging pedagogy used in a large number of First-Year Seminars at other institutions. This pedagogy can be used in the form presented or with variations as the unifying experience for a FYS spanning most of the semester or for a limited number of sessions only. It involves close reading and critical analysis of primary sources, as well as writing and speaking. Detailed documentation and support material will be made available during the workshops. Participants will be provided with individualized material before the workshop as preparation allowing faculty members to experience the FYS model also from a student perspective; participants are expected to complete some reading before participating in the workshop. The pedagogy showcased in this module is one that can be adapted also to other classes – the module may therefore also be of interest for faculty members teaching other classes (not FYS). Participation in this workshop requires attendance of both modules (morning and afternoon) on the same day. Seats in this workshop are limited - early registration recommended.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to two modules.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.  
FYS Course Development Workshop
Wednesday, May 9, 2012, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Facilitated By:   Mailloux, Steve, Ph.D., English
  Peters, KJ, Ph.D., English
  Herreiner, Dorothea, Ph.D., Economics and CTE

Schedule
Slides - FYS: Objectives, Practices, Results
Slides - Course Development
Handout - Writing Instructor Models
Handout - Worksheets Course Development (see Fink 2005, Fink 2003; see Pedagogical Resources)
FYS Course Criteria
Rhetorical Arts Course Criteria

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Refreshments will be provided during the workshop.  Lunch will be available upon request. If you have any dietary needs, please let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

During this workshop, faculty will develop a basic syllabus for a First-Year Seminar they intend to teach based on the course criteria for FYS. Based on key course design principles, faculty members will develop an outline of their course satisfying the learning outcomes and defining characteristic of a LMU FYS. This workshop will offer the opportunity to discuss and work together with colleagues when developing the course outline. This workshop should be combined with a FYS Reading and/or Writing module and supplements the Immersion FYS Model modules.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to one module.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.  


Teaching Reading Workshop
Wednesday, May 9, 2012, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Monika Hogan, Ph.D., English, Pasadena City College  
  RA Community College Coordinator, Strategic Literacy Initiative/ WestEd
Coordinator of the Reading Apprenticeship Project, 3CSN

 This workshop supplements the FYS Course Development module by focusing on the teaching of critical reading skills. Based on a selection of texts from different fields and a variety of exercises, faculty members will engage each other in short teaching units that explore different approaches of engaging students in close and careful reading and understanding of primary sources. Instructors will not only experience different approaches of close and critical reading, but will also develop reading samples and instructions for their FYS. Ideally, this module is taken together with the Course Development and Writing modules, as well as the Immersion FYS Model modules.

Schedule
ECHO Recording I
ECHO Recording II

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Refreshments will be provided during the workshop.  Lunch will be available upon request. If you have any dietary needs, please let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to one module.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.  


Immersion - FYS Model : The Threshold of Democracy
Thursday, May 10, 2012, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

The Threshold of Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C

Presented By: Thaddeus Russell, PhD, American Studies, Occidental College.

Schedule.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. No drop-ins. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Upon participation confirmation, participants will receive a copy of the material for this workshop, including a copy of the book with the course material, a copy of Plato's The Republic, and individualized material with instructions for the specific role each participant will assume during the workshop.

Lunch and refreshments will be provided during the workshop. Lunch will be a working lunch - expect to continue discussing and developing your project over lunch.

If you have any specific dietary needs, please do let us know at teachers@lmu.edu asap.

This immersion workshop allows faculty members to experience a shortened version of a highly effective and engaging pedagogy used in a large number of First-Year Seminars at other institutions. This pedagogy can be used in the form presented or with variations as the unifying experience for a FYS spanning most of the semester or for a limited number of sessions only. It involves close reading and critical analysis of primary sources, as well as writing and speaking. Detailed documentation and support material will be made available during the workshops. Participants will be provided with individualized material before the workshop as preparation allowing faculty members to experience the FYS model also from a student perspective; participants are expected to complete some reading before participating in the workshop. The pedagogy showcased in this module is one that can be adapted also to other classes – the module may therefore also be of interest for faculty members teaching other classes (not FYS). Participation in this workshop requires attendance of both modules (morning and afternoon) on the same day. Seats in this workshop are limited - early registration recommended.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to two modules.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.   
Course Development Workshop (Foundations and Explorations)
Monday, May 14, 2012, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

Schedule:
Discussion of Course Criteria for Foundations and Explorations
Course Design

Slides
Worksheets
Foundations Course Criteria
Explorations Course Criteria

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Refreshments will be provided during the workshop.  Lunch will be available upon request. If you have any dietary needs, please let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

During this workshop, faculty will develop a basic syllabus for a Foundations or Explorations class based on the LMU course criteria by modifying an existing syllabus or developing a new one. This workshop will rely on key course design principles to develop course elements addressing learning outcomes for the respective courses. This workshop will offer the opportunity to discuss and work together with colleagues when developing the course outline.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to one module.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.  

Teaching Writing Workshop
Monday, May 14, 2012, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: KJ Peters, English, LMU

Schedule
Other Material provided: Student Essays, Articles in Schedule

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Refreshments will be provided during the workshop.  Lunch will be available upon request. If you have any dietary needs, please let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop supplements the FYS Course Development module by focusing on different strategies of teaching writing. This workshop addresses specific writing aspects of the FYS as well as possible models of collaboration with writing instructors. Faculty will have the opportunity to mine their own writing process as a source for a sound writing pedagogy. The workshop will help professor explore writing as a critical act of "thinking on the page." Time saving strategies, multiple modes of student engagement and evaluation, and helpful classroom practices will be the focus of the workshop. This workshop is also suited for instructors who plan to teach a course satisfying a writing flag in different fields. Instructors will leave with a rich set of ideas and exercises as well as some assignments they can incorporate into their classes. Ideally, this module is taken together with the Course Development and Reading modules.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to one module.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.  

Teaching Information Literacy Workshop
Tuesday, May 15, 2012, from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM in UNH 3030

A detailed schedule and description will be made available asap.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Refreshments will be provided during the workshop.  Lunch will be available upon request. If you have any dietary needs, please let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop will introduce strategies for incorporating information literacy into classes across academic disciplines. Exercises to help students learn how to find, evaluate, and reflect on information sources will be introduced and participants will have hands-on time to begin to adapt them to their disciplines and courses. Instructors will leave with a toolkit of classroom ideas, exercises, and assignments that they can incorporate into their classes, as well as contacts among LMU's librarians who will serve as a resource and as partners for the information literacy components of the new core.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to one module.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.  

Teaching Oral Communication Workshop
Tuesday, May 15, 2012, from 1:30 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Presented By: Therese Edwards, Emily Ravenscroft, Michele Hammers, Wenshu Lee, and Phil Wander, Communication Studies, LMU

This workshop introduces a selection of methods and approaches to include oral communication elements in classes. This class is hands-on, showcasing and putting into practice the methods discussed. 

Schedule
Handout

ECHO Recording [please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu]

Reading and Reference Suggestions:  Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

Refreshments will be provided during the workshop.  Lunch will be available upon request. If you have any dietary needs, please let us know at teachers@lmu.edu.

This workshop is a summer course development workshop for new core curriculum courses; grants are available to support course development. This workshop corresponds to one module.

Please direct any questions you may have to teachers@lmu.edu.