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Fall 2013

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

Semesters:  [Fall 2014]    [Spring 2014]    [Fall 2013]    [Spring 2013]    [Fall 2012]    [Spring 2012]    [Fall 2011]

Date Event Speaker(s)/Presenter(s)
 8/9/13 Part-Time Faculty Orientation   Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
 8/12/13 Teaching Critical Reading in the Digital Age Matthew Parfitt, PhD, Boston University  
 8/12/13 Critical Reading as the First Stage in the Writing Process   Matthew Parfitt, PhD, Boston University  
 8/13/13 Integrating Quantitative Reasoning   Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
 8/13/13 Core Course Learning Outcomes: Planning Your Assignments to Understand and Improve Student Achievement   Laura Massa, Director of Assessment  
 8/14/13 Completing Course Design   Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
 8/14/13 First-Year Seminar Course Design   Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
 8/21/13 Part-Time Faculty Orientation Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
 8/24/13 Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
 8/27/13 Our Students and Their Transition to College  Dorothea K Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
Jennifer Belichesky, EdD, Acting Assistant Dean, Student Engagement, Retention & Transition
Shelby Schaefer, MA, University Advisor  
 9/17/13 Asking the Right Questions: Best Practices for Designing Exams   Laura Massa, PhD, Director, Office of Assessment  
 9/19/13 The How-To of International Course Immersions   Adrian Doyle, Associate Director of the Study Abroad Office
Jack Hobson, Director of the Study Abroad Office 
 9/23/13 Funding Opportunities in STEM Education  Joseph McNicholas, MBA, PhD, CRA, Director, Office of Research and Sponsored Projects  
 9/26/13 Class Presentations: Best Practices and Grading   Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
Kathy Norris, MA, MS, Clinical Assistant Professor, Communication Studies
Meghna Singhvi, PhD, Assistant Professor, Accounting
 10/1/13 If Men are from Mars, and Women are from Venus, where are Our Students from?   Beth Brewer, EdD, School of Education, Director of Catholic Teacher Preparation and CAST  
 10/8/13 Step-by-Step Survey Design: A Practical Guide to Designing Your Survey  Christine Chavez, MA, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation 
10/11/13 Rhetorical Arts Professional Development Workshop  Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator of the Core
Michele Hammers, PhD, Associate Professor, Communication Studies
Aimee Ross-Kilroy, PhD, Clinical Professor, English 
10/24/13  Unleashing the Power of Rubrics  Laura Massa, PhD, Director, Office of Assessment 
10/28/13  Teacher Statistical Misconceptions: Results from a Professional Development (CREATE-STEM) Anna Bargagliotti, PhD, Assistant Professor, Mathematics              
10/29/13  Internationalization at LMU: Supporting Our Growing International Student Body Denise Folga, Director of the Office for International Students and Scholars
Janna Goebel, MA, English
10/30/13  Rhetorical Arts: Developing Curriculum and Syllabus Design - Workshop 1  Aimee Kilroy-Ross, PhD, English, Rhetorical Arts Coordinator
Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator of the Core 
10/31/13  Rhetorical Arts: Developing Curriculum and Syllabus Design - Workshop 1  Aimee Kilroy-Ross, PhD, English, Rhetorical Arts Coordinator
Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator of the Core 
10/31/13  Cheese-Wine-Chocolate: What is Rigor?  Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
11/5/13 The Common Core State Standards: Why They Matter Michael Castiglione, Clinical Assistant Professor, Specialized Programs in Urban Education
Lindsay DeVeny, Clinical Assistant Professor, Specialized Programs in Urban Education
11/6/13  Rhetorical Arts: Developing Curriculum and Syllabus Design - Workshop 2  Aimee Kilroy-Ross, PhD, English, Rhetorical Arts Coordinator
Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator of the Core 
11/7/13  Rhetorical Arts: Developing Curriculum and Syllabus Design - Workshop 2 Aimee Kilroy-Ross, PhD, English, Rhetorical Arts Coordinator
Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator of the Core 
11/11/13 Physics First: Impact on SAT Math Scores (CREATE-STEM) Craig Bouma, EdD, Teacher, Loyola High School
11/14/13 Alternative Perspectives on Ability - Living and Learning with Diverse Abilities  Gina Ceylan, MS, Science Education, University of Missouri 
11/14/13 Inclusive Design for Learning: Building on Diverse Abilities in our Classes
Gina Ceylan, MS, Science Education, University of Missouri
11/20/13  Brown-Bag Lunch - FYS Writing Instructors  Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator of the Core
Aimee Kilroy-Ross, PhD, English, Rhetorical Arts Coordinator
11/21/13  Brown-Bag Lunch - FYS Writing Instructors  Danelle Dyckhoff, MA, Administrative Coordinator for the Core
Aimee Kilroy-Ross, PhD, English, Rhetorical Arts Coordinator
11/25/13 Jesuit Rhetorical History: Ministries of the Word and Mastery of the Word
Cinthia Gannett, PhD, Associate Professor of English, Director of Core Writing, Fairfield University
11/25/13
Eloquence for Everyone Cinthia Gannett, PhD, Associate Professor of English, Director of Core Writing, Fairfield University
12/5/13
Student Self-Assessment and Reflection in a Learner Controlled Environment
Jeffrey Phillips, PhD, Associate Professor, Physics
12/13/13  Part-Time Faculty Orientation Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
1/11/14  Part-Time Faculty Orientation  Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 


Part-Time Faculty Orientation 
Friday, August 9, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):
  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • LMU Bookstore
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning. Lunch will be provided.
Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4] [Part 5]


Teaching Critical Reading in the Digital Age
Monday, August 12, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Moderated By: Matthew Parfitt, PhD, Boston University

In the digital age, students read differently -- reading fewer books, reading on devices like tablets and phones, reading interrupted by frequent distractions. Yet attentive, absorbed, thoughtful reading is still an essential part of a liberal education. What exactly do we mean by "critical" reading? What sort of activities does it entail? How can we help our students develop this skill and practice it in our courses? This interactive workshop will offer concrete strategies for helping students to focus on, comprehend, and respond intelligently to the readings we assign.

Matthew Parfitt (Ph. D. Boston College) is Associate Professor and Chair of the Rhetoric Division at the College of General Studies, Boston University. He has been teaching reading, writing and critical thinking for twenty years. In 2003, he received the Peyton Richter Award for interdisciplinary teaching. He is the author of Writing in Response (Bedford/St. Martins 2011), a brief rhetoric with a strong emphasis on critical reading, and an approach to writing that thoroughly integrates critical reading strategies into the writing process.
With Dawn Skorczewski (Brandeis University), he edited the anthology, Conflicts and Crises in the Composition Classroom: And What Instructors Can Do About Them (Heinemann/Boynton Cook 2003). He has also published on World War I literature, the poetry of Robert Frost, and composition studies. He is currently writing a study of Walt Whitman’s notion of “comrade love” as interpreted by British writers from 1870 to 1930.

Additional Workshop offered by Dr. Matt Parfitt:

Monday, 8/12, pm: Critical Reading as the First Stage in the Writing Process
Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3]


Critical Reading as the First Stage in the Writing Process
Monday, August 12, 2013 from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Moderated By: Matthew Parfitt, PhD, Boston University

Most college writing requires students to respond to texts -- either assigned texts or texts found in the library or online. In order to write well, students must first read well, hearing clearly what the author is saying as well as generating ideas of their own in response. Many first year students have little experience as critical readers of non-fiction texts, especially scholarly texts. This workshop will offer strategies for helping students become more complex thinkers as they integrate active, dialogical reading seamlessly into a writing process. It will address the different requirements of reading for research papers vs reading for papers about assigned texts. And it will give particular attention to helping students work responsibly and successfully with scholarly articles and books.

Matthew Parfitt (Ph. D. Boston College) is Associate Professor and Chair of the Rhetoric Division at the College of General Studies, Boston University. He has been teaching reading, writing and critical thinking for twenty years. In 2003, he received the Peyton Richter Award for interdisciplinary teaching. He is the author of Writing in Response (Bedford/St. Martins 2011), a brief rhetoric with a strong emphasis on critical reading, and an approach to writing that thoroughly integrates critical reading strategies into the writing process.

With Dawn Skorczewski (Brandeis University), he edited the anthology, Conflicts and Crises in the Composition Classroom: And What Instructors Can Do About Them (Heinemann/Boynton Cook 2003). He has also published on World War I literature, the poetry of Robert Frost, and composition studies. He is currently writing a study of Walt Whitman’s notion of “comrade love” as interpreted by British writers from 1870 to 1930.

Additional Workshop offered by Dr. Matt Parfitt:

Monday, 8/12, am: Teaching Critical Reading in the Digital Age
Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4]


Integrating Quantitative Reasoning
Tuesday, August 13, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Moderated By: Dorothea Herreiner, PhD

How do we teach quantitative reasoning to our students when we flag courses accordingly in the Core? How do students best learn quantitative reasoning? What applications, assignments, and exercises work well when we want to reinforce students' ability to apply quantitative, mathematical, statistical and/or computational argumentation in core courses (and beyond)? In this workshop, we will cover best practices and exchange experiences and material. All participants are invited to bring along ideas for assignments, examples of class activities and assignments, and challenges experienced in classes. This hands-on interactive workshop targets faculty with diverse backgrounds from ALL disciplines.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2]


Core Course Learning Outcomes: Planning Your Assignments to Understand and Improve Student Achievement
Tuesday, August 13, 2013 from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Every course in the new Core has a set of learning outcomes that students are supposed to achieve through completing the course. If you are teaching a Core course, you will need a plan to know if students are learning what they are supposed to.

In this hands-on workshop we will work on planning assignments to understand achievement of outcomes, and talk about how to use what you learn from student performance to help students improve. We will also cover the basics of rubric and test design so that you have the tools you need. Whatever state your Core course is in (e.g., idea, proposal, syllabus), please bring it with you. If you have started work on your assignments, please bring those along too.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events.

Echo Recording


Completing Course Design 
Wednesday, August 14, 2013 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Moderated By: Dorothea Herreiner, PhD

Based on key course design principles, instructors will analyze each others' course proposals. To participate in this workshop instructors should have a fully or almost fully developed course proposal and syllabus. Instructors need to bring along all assignments, readings, and other material for the course so that they can discuss details of their courses with others.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events click here.

First Year Seminar Course Design
Wednesday, August 14, 2013 from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Moderated By: Dorothea Herreiner, PhD

During this workshop, faculty will develop a basic syllabus for a First-Year Seminar they intend to teach based on the course criteria for FYS. Based on key course design principles, faculty members will develop an outline of their course satisfying the learning outcomes and defining characteristic of a LMU FYS. This workshop will offer the opportunity to discuss and work together with colleagues when developing the course outline. This workshop is targeted towards faculty who are considering teaching a FYS in the future and are in the beginning stages of developing the class; faculty teaching a FYS this coming academic year are also welcome.

Participation in this workshop is limited to registered participants only. All registered participants are required to attend the entire workshop.

This workshop is a Core Course Development Workshop - for details on the new Core Curriculum and other events, see HERE.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3]

Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Wednesday, August 21, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ..
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies

The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):

  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4]

Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Saturday, August 24, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as

  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ..
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies

The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):

  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3] [Part 4]

Our Students and Their Transition to College
Tuesday, August 27, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Presented by:
Dorothea K Herreiner, PhD, Director of Center for Teaching Excellence
Jennifer Belichesky, EdD, Acting Assistant Dean, Student Engagement, Retention & Transition
Shelby Schaefer, MA, University Advisor

Come and join us for three short presentations that discuss the backgrounds and expectations of our freshmen, the typical development and challenges they experience as they transfer to college, and tools and services LMU offers to support our students and us as teachers as we help them adjust to college. This event is particularly valuable for those teaching First-Year Seminars and other freshmen classes, but also provides much information for all those wanting to learn more about this generation of students.

This event provides an opportunity for First-Year Seminar Instructors and others to get together and to celebrate the start of the Core.

Echo Recording

Asking the Right Questions: Best Practices for Designing Exams
Tuesday, September 17, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by:
Laura Massa, Ph.D., Director, Office of Assessment

Creating an exam can be a challenging task. Unfortunately many of us have had little to no training in how to develop fair and effective tests. ‘Asking the Right Questions’ will prepare you to purposely design test that will both accurately capture your student’s learning and help reinforce that learning. In this workshop we will cover general design principles, the dos and don’ts of common question types (e.g., multiple choice, short answer), and how to use the results to understand achievement of student learning outcomes.

Echo Recording

The How-To of International Course Immersions
Thursday, September 19, 2013 from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by:
Adrian Doyle, Associate Director of the Study Abroad Office
Jack Hobson, Director of the Study Abroad Office

Contributors:
Holli Levitsky, Associate Professor, English
Beth Stoddard, Associate Professor, Educational Leadership

Interested in teaching short-term academic overseas trips embedded within LMU semester/summer-based courses? We will discuss how this kind of trip would work logistically with the sponsoring LMU Department/College and we will highlight the tools which the Study Abroad Office can offer to assist with the process. Come and talk with other interested faculty, LMU faculty that have successfully led course-specific international immersion programs, and representatives of the Study Abroad Office.

Echo Recording

Resources:
Handout
Prof. Holli Levitsky's syllabi:

Funding Opportunities in STEM Education
Monday, September 23, 2013 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Event Flyer

Presented by: Joseph McNicholas, M.B.A., Ph.D., C.R.A., Director, Office of Research and Sponsored Projects

During this session, Joseph McNicholas, the Director of LMU's Office for Research and Sponsored Projects, will share news from the major and smaller federal sponsors of STEM Education including an inventory of upcoming solicitations along  a brief description.  There will be time for questions and fuller discussion of how LMU can best take advantage of funding opportunities in STEM Education.

Class Presentations: Best Practices and Grading
Thursday, September 26, 2013 from 12:!5 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by:
Dorothea Herreiner, Director, Center for Teaching Excellence
Kathy Norris, Clinical Assistant Professor, Communication Studies
Meghna Singhvi, Assistant Professor, Accounting

How can we successfully use student presentations in class and have meaningful learning happen? What support/instructions do we need to give our students? How should we grade such presentations? Join us for a hands-on session where we will discuss appropriate student support and grading standards which we will apply to some student presentations. Please bring your own material along to share. This session was inspired by this summer's sessions on evaluating the Oral Communication Learning Outcome.

Echo Recording

Resources:
Handout - Tips, Tricks and Tools for Instructors
NCA Competent Speaker Speech Evaluation Form
Oral Communication VALUE Rubric
Oral Communication VALUE Rubric for General Education

If Men are from Mars, and Women are from Venus, where are Our Students from?
Tuesday, October 1, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Beth Brewer, EdD, School of Education, Director of Catholic Teacher Preparation and CAST

A session that presents data on how students are using technology, their experiences in K-12 schools, and asks attendees to work collaboratively to identify three concrete ways that we can support students who come from these environments (e.g., pedagogical shifts, 21st century learning, etc.).

This presentation is part of Beth Brewer’s Faculty Associate Project, “Rethinking the Student Learning Experience”.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Resources:
Handout
How Teachers Are Using Technology at Home and in Their Classrooms
Some Topics to Consider When Critiquing Talks


Step-by-Step Survey Design: A Practical Guide to Designing Your Survey
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Christine Chavez, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation

Thinking of conducting a survey? With careful planning and well-crafted design, a survey can be a powerful and insightful tool. But how do you get started?

This workshop will introduce you to the basic steps of designing a survey. You will also learn about survey ethics and the Institutional Review Board, survey resources available at LMU, and how to design your survey so that you can get the most out of your results.

Lunch will be included. Please RSVP to surveys@lmu.edu or x86691.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording


Rhetorical Arts Professional Development Workshops

Event Flyer

These workshops are designed for Rhetorical Arts instructors teaching in the spring of 2014. Others interested in teaching Rhetorical Arts are welcome.

They have been organized by Jeffrey Siker and Danelle Dyckhoff. Please direct all questions to them.

Friday, October 11, 2013, 8:30am-3:30pm
This full-day workshop will provide new Rhetorical Arts instructors with training in the Jesuit Rhetorical tradition and oral and written communication pedagogy. In addition, we will review models for curriculum development and syllabus design. 
Sessions on:

  • The Jesuit Rhetorical Tradition: The Good Person Writing and Speaking Well for the Common Good (Aimee Ross-Kilroy and Danelle Dyckhoff)
  • Varied Contexts of Public Communication: Oral and Written Communication Pedagogy (Michele Hammers)
  • Rhetorical Principles and Practices 1: Argument, Evidence, and Delivery in Written Communication (Aimee Ross-Kilroy)
  • Rhetorical Principles and Practices 2: Argument, Evidence, and Delivery in Oral Communication (Jim Bunker) 

Wednesday, October 30, 2013, 12:00-1:00pm          OR      Thursday, October 31, 2013, 12:15-1:15pm
Rhetorical Arts: Developing Curriculum and Syllabus Design – Workshop 1 

Wednesday, November 6, 2013, 12:00-1:00pm        OR      Thursday, November 7, 2013, 12:15-1:15pm
Rhetorical Arts: Developing Curriculum and Syllabus Design – Workshop 2


Unleashing the Power of Rubrics
Thursday, October 24, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Laura Massa, Ph.D., Director, Office of Assessment

Rubrics are a powerful tool that can help you understand and promote student learning while saving you time. Unleashing the Power of Rubrics will present a 5-step process for creating rubrics, share ideas for how to enhance student learning with rubrics, and provide tips for speedily and successfully capturing what your students have learned.

As part of the workshop, participants will be given time to begin building a rubric. Bring along a description of an assignment so you can get started on your own rubric.

Lunch will be provided, please RSVP to assessment@lmu.edu or call 310.258.2628.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Teacher Statistical Misconceptions: Results from a Professional Development (CREATE-STEM)
Monday, October 28, 2013 from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Anna Bargagliotti, Assistant Professor, Mathematics

In order to sustain the increased need for statistical literacy across the world, there is an immediate requirement to provide high quality statistical preparation of teachers. Project-SET is an NSF funded project aimed at developing materials to prepare secondary teachers to teach statistics. The materials are informed by best practices in statistics education, and two developed learning progressions (LPs). In this talk, we present preliminary results from the first part of a professional development (PD) designed to test whether the materials are effective in preparing teachers to teach sampling variability.
Twelve teachers enrolled to take a 40-hour PD structured around the Project-SET LPs. The LPs are organized in loop structures scaffolding the material in a way that the content become progressively more complex. After each loop, participants were administered in-class assessment tasks to uncover whether they progressed through the loop in the manner outlined by the LP. Results from the in-class tasks highlight several misconceptions that teachers have. This talk will discuss these misconceptions, illustrate teacher's work, and discuss how these misconceptions may be corrected.

Refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This talk is part of the Collaborative Research in Education, Assessment, and Teaching Environments for the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.


Internationalization at LMU: Supporting Our Growing International Student Body
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer 

Presented by:
Denise Folga, Director of the Office for International Students and Scholars
Janna Goebel, MA, English as a Second Language

As LMU’s international student body grows, who are our international students and what can we do to support them? In this presentation, we will address questions such as: Where do our students come from? Where will they come from in the future? What are typical challenges that our international students face as they join our campus community? What support services do we offer to our international students and English language learners? We plan to provide a forum for faculty to discuss their experiences when interacting with international students at LMU and we will offer research-based strategies for instructors to incorporate global perspectives and their international students’ experiences into the classroom.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Resources:

Presentation Slides
References

Cheese-Wine-Chocolate: What is Rigor?
Thursday, October 31, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Please join us for a discussion on what we mean by rigor in our classes. We will be introducing a few LMU-specific and general findings and invite everybody to come with their own thoughts on what defines rigor in their classes and field. We look forward to having an open and engaging discussion.

Wine, cheese, and chocolate will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events Calendar.


The Common Core State Standards: Why They Matter
Tuesday, November 5, 2013 from 12:15 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Mike Castiglione and Lindsay DeVeny, Specialized Programs in Urban Education

Get to know your audience! What impact will Common Core State Standards (CCSS) have on entering undergraduate students?

Come to the CTE November 5th to receive information on what implications the CCSS will have on incoming LMU undergraduate students and how CCSS will affect higher education. The session will focus on what the CCSS actually are and why CCSS bring a radical change to “how” K-12 educators have traditionally delivered classroom instruction. Learn about the 6 main shifts CCSS bring to both English Language Arts and Math, and the impact across all core subject areas. The session features an introduction to Webb’s depths of knowledge as an assessment tool that measures cognitive demand (Webb, 1997). You will also have an opportunity to interact with some technology based sample questions.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Resources:

Presentation Slides
College and Career Ready Anchor Standards
Key Instructional Shifts of the Common Core State Standards
Smarter Balanced - Grade 9 ELA Draft Sample

This presentation is part of Beth Brewer’s Faculty Associate Project, “Rethinking the Student Learning Experience”.

Physics First: Impact on SAT Math Scores (CREATE-STEM)
Monday, November 11, 2013 from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in UNH 3030.

Event Flyer

Presented by: Craig Bouma, Teacher, Loyola High School

Improving science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has become a national priority and the call to modernize high school science has been heard. A Physics First (PF) curriculum sequence of physics-chemistry-biology driven by inquiry- and project-based learning offers a viable alternative to the traditional curricular sequence of biology-chemistry-physics based on traditional methods of teaching. This study determines the impact of a PF program on math achievement (SAT math scores) after the first two cohorts of students completed the PF program at Matteo Ricci High School.  In this talk, we provide quantitative data to inform the PF debate and to advance secondary science education.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

This talk is part of the Collaborative Research in Education, Assessment, and Teaching Environments for the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics series. The goal of the series is to provide a forum for faculty working on research related to STEM education to present and discuss their work. All interested welcome.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Alternative Perspectives on Ability - Living and Learning with Diverse Abilities
Thursday, November 14, 2013 from 12:15pm to 1:30pm in VDA 190

Event Flyer 

Presented by: Gina Ceylan, University of Missouri

Is anyone typical in every physical, psychological, and social way? If not, then what is “disability”?  Based on our own experiences with (dis)ability as students, we will explore different views of ability and their implications for success in college and beyond. Join us for a constructive conversation about living and learning with diverse abilities and about misperceptions and possibilities. Whether or not you identify as having a disability, are interested in working effectively with people of different abilities, or are just curious, be inspired by Gina’s experience with her own changing ability as she was going blind, her academic strategies and successes, and her dedication to improving inclusion in college.

Biography
Gina Ceylan earned her BS in geology from the College of Charleston and a MS in marine geophysics (undersea volcanos) from University of Missouri in 2010. She is currently finishing her PhD in science education at the University of Missouri, focusing on implementing Inclusive Design for Learning (IDL) in college geoscience courses. Although Gina considered pursuing a PhD in geology because she is passionate about our planet, she is even more passionate about improving inclusion and contributing to teaching and learning in the STEM fields and beyond. She works with different offices of the University of Missouri to improve inclusion of students with diverse abilities. Gina has been progressing towards blindness since birth, and been effectively totally blind for over four years.

All students are invited. Pizza and refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click
here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Inclusive Design for Learning: Building on Diverse Abilities in our Classes
Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Gina Ceylan, University of Missouri

Join us for an interactive session on Inclusive Design for Learning (IDL). IDL is a framework for designing our instruction for more effectively engaging students with diverse abilities. We will focus on how we view challenges related to diversity, basics of the IDL framework,  resources for implementation and ideas for applications. Increasing involvement of people with diverse abilities in our fields (STEM and other) is both ethical and essential in moving our disciplines forward, but presents an enormous challenge to us as instructors.

How can we recognize and minimize access barriers in our educational contexts? How can we adapt our teaching approaches to better reach a diversity of students and to benefit all students? Let’s talk about how we can build on local resources, effective existing teaching practices and novel strategies to address these questions.

Biography
Gina Ceylan is currently finishing her PhD in science education at the University of Missouri, focusing on implementing Inclusive Design for Learning (IDL) in college geoscience courses. She also teaches a course on IDL for graduate students, and works with all levels of MU’s academic systems to improve inclusion of students with diverse abilities. She earned her BS in geology from the College of Charleston and an MS in marine geophysics (undersea volcanos) from University of Missouri in 2010. Although Gina considered pursuing a PhD in geology because she is passionate about our planet, she is even more passionate about improving inclusion and contributing to teaching and learning in the STEM fields and beyond. She has been progressing towards blindness since birth, and been effectively totally blind for over four years.

Gina’s work on inclusive design began through leading various campus groups and events. It has since developed into sustained and growing student mentoring and outreach activities and a course in Inclusive Design for Learning (IDL) for future faculty. Through the NSF-funded CIRTL network (Center for Integrating Research, Teaching & Learning), she also offers the IDL course to current and future faculty. Gina leads a very active IDL group of faculty, staff and graduate students who work together to explore innovative ways of improving their inclusive teaching. Also, she offers a large variety of TA training and workshops on the MU campus, at local community colleges, and at international geoscience conferences. A NSF proposal to further develop the IDL course and community, to make these available at other colleges and universities, and to create a website for sharing resources is currently pending. Gina finds improving inclusion on her own campus extremely rewarding, and is excited to inspire similar change at other schools – she looks forward to expanding these efforts.

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Resources:
IDL Framework
IDL Workshop Notes
DO-IT Center
Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning 
Center for Applied Special Tech (CAST) - UDL
National Center for Universal Design for Learning
The International Association for Geoscience Diversity (IAGD)

Videos:
YouTube Channel 1
YouTube Channel 2


Brown-Bag Lunch - FYS Writing Instructors
Wednesday, November 20, 2013 from 12:00pm to 1:00pm in UNH 3030 OR Thursday, November 21, 2013 from 12:15pm to 1:15pm in UNH 3030

These workshops are designed for First Year Seminar instructors. They have been organized by Jeffrey Siker and Danelle Dyckhoff. Please direct all questions to them.

Please click here and here to view the events in the LMU events calendar. 

Jesuit Rhetorical History: Ministries of the Word and Mastery of the Word
Monday, November 25, 2013 at 12:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Cinthia Gannett, Associate Professor of English, Fairfield University

This presentation will provide an overview of Jesuit rhetorical traditions, particularly focusing on the history of rhetorical education. We will consider the capacious Renaissance sense and scope of rhetoric as it was enacted in what the Jesuits referred to as “ministries of the word,” and how it has acted (and been enacted pedagogically over the centuries) as a centering aim of Jesuit education in the form of eloquentia perfecta. The aim of a Jesuit rhetorical education has always been to foster the development of students who are informed, ethical, civil, sympathetic, articulate writers and speakers, willing and committed to engage with their larger communities through the careful use of words, not weapons. The effective practice of rhetoric in any field or domain in this context also invokes “action,” through persuasion, decisions taken, laws passed, knowledge shared, policies created, and other physical action as well.

We will also examine some of the current experiments in American Jesuit higher education on reimagining the roles and sites of rhetorical education, as a way of offering context for Loyola Marymount’s ambitious core revision. In particular, we’ll look at Loyola of Maryland, Fairfield, Fordham, and Seattle University as well as other schools as current examples of efforts to recreate a modern version of education for eloquentia perfecta for the 21st century.

Biography
Cinthia Gannett is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at Fairfield University, as well as the Center for Academic Excellence Faculty Consultant on Writing. She has previously directed writing programs, writing centers and Writing across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. She is the author of Gender and the Journal (1992) and several articles and essays on journal traditions, archival work in composition, and writing centers/writing across the curriculum.  

Cinthia has served on the Board of the Rhetoric Society of America and is currently the President of the Jesuit Conference on Rhetoric and Composition.  Her current research interests include international writing studies, action research traditions, and the history and current applications of Jesuit rhetorical education.  She and John C. Brereton are currently co-editing a collection of essays, Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Rhetorical Studies. (Fordham Press, forthcoming, 2014).

Additional workshop offered by Dr. Cinthia Gannett:

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recordings [Part I][Part II]

Eloquence for Everyone
Monday, November 25, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Cinthia Gannett, Associate Professor of English, Fairfield University

In this workshop we will brainstorm specific ways of creating curricula, assignments, and pedagogical practices that are both current and yet aligned with the Jesuit educational heritage. One of the distinctive features of the Jesuit educational system has been its immersive multi-year focus on language, literature (which included poetry and history), grammar, and rhetoric through constant active practice. Students worked through complex forms of language study and cross-translation, prepared close readings, wrote regularly, recited, declaimed, debated, engaged in group oral exercises, and demonstrated their “erudition and eloquence” in a variety of public forums, pageants, and performances (including theatre and dance) for the whole school and larger community. As Ignatius wrote, students should learn “con mucho ejercicio.”  The cultivation of these broader habits of mind anchored the whole curriculum, in which learning specialized bodies of knowledge was important (erudition), but was seen as serving the larger purposes of a liberal education, which includes both disciplinary and professional development as well as education for citizenship and a full social and moral life. How can we build in the kinds of rich, varied, immersive discursive and experiential pedagogies necessary for serious and sustained develop of these complex habits of mind?  How do these features align with Ignatian pedagogy and Writing across/ within the Disciplines initiatives?   How can the FYS and Rhetorical Arts courses at LMU act as genuine springboards for the ongoing discursive and intellectual development of students across the new Core and through the major curricula?

Biography
Cinthia Gannett is Associate Professor of English and Director of Core Writing at Fairfield University, as well as the Center for Academic Excellence Faculty Consultant on Writing. She has previously directed writing programs, writing centers and Writing across the Curriculum programs at the University of New Hampshire and Loyola University in Maryland. She is the author of Gender and the Journal (1992) and several articles and essays on journal traditions, archival work in composition, and writing centers/writing across the curriculum.  

Cinthia has served on the Board of the Rhetoric Society of America and is currently the President of the Jesuit Conference on Rhetoric and Composition.  Her current research interests include international writing studies, action research traditions, and the history and current applications of Jesuit rhetorical education.  She and John C. Brereton are currently co-editing a collection of essays, Traditions of Eloquence: The Jesuits and Rhetorical Studies. (Fordham Press, forthcoming, 2014).

Additional workshop offered by Dr. Cinthia Gannett:

Refreshments will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recording

Student Self-Assessment and Reflection in a Learner Controlled Environment
Thursday, December 5, 2013 from 12:15pm to 1:30pm

Event Flyer

Presented by: Jeffrey Phillips, Associate Professor, Physics

Students who successfully engage in self-regulated learning, are able to plan their own studying, monitoring their progress and make necessary adjustments based upon the data and feedback they gather.  In order to promote this type of independent learning in students, and create a course structure where individuals are able to get the personalized practice that they need, a recent General Physics course was modified to employ features found in learner-controlled instruction courses.  In this course, students were able to choose many of their own out-of-class learning activities.  Rather than collecting daily or weekly problem set solutions, assignments were mostly progress reports where students reported which activities they had attempted, self-assessment of their progress, and plans for their next study session.  While many students utilized this format to its fullest, others simply exploited the flexibility to do minimal out-of-class practice.  An analysis of the students’ progress reports, pre and post-instruction surveys and measures of conceptual understanding will be presented, followed by a discussion about the opportunities and challenges of developing self-regulated learning in our students.

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Echo Recording

Part-Time Faculty Orientation 
Friday, December 13, 2013 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as

  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):
  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • LMU Bookstore
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning. Lunch will be provided.
Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Alternative Date:
Saturday, January 11, 2014

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.

Echo Recordings [Part 1] [Part 2] [Part 3]

Part-Time Faculty Orientation 
Saturday, January 11, 2014 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. in UNH 3030

To help part-time faculty become successful teachers at LMU who contribute to LMU’s goal of academic excellence, the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) organizes an orientation for new part-time faculty.

During the part-time faculty orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s History and Mission
  • LMU's Students
  • Getting Ready for Class – Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU – Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, ...
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How – Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, ...
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
The orientation will include a lunch during which you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching (requested):
  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • LMU Bookstore
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Breakfast and light refreshments are available during the morning. Lunch will be provided.
Please RSVP at teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Alternative Date:
Friday, December 13, 2013

Please click here to view the event in the LMU events calendar.