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Fall 2011

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

Semesters:  [Fall 2014]    [Spring 2014]    [Fall 2013]    [Spring 2013]    [Fall 2012]    [Spring 2012]    [Fall 2011]

Date Event Speaker(s)/Presenter(s)
8/9/11
CBL Tour of Service Locations
8/10/11
SoTL Brown Bag
 
8/15/11
New Faculty Orientation
 
8/16/11
New Faculty Orientation
 
8/17/11
New Faculty Orientation
 
8/26/11
Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE
9/8/11
CBL Brown Bag Meeting: Reflections
 
9/20/11
Teaching and Learning in the University Honors Program Brad Elliott Stone, PhD, University Honors Program
9/21/11
SoTL Brown Bag: Showcase Planning  
9/22/11 CBL Brown Bag: Sustainability  
9/23/11
QQSW: Step-by-Step Survey Design: A Practical Guide to Designing Your Survey Christine Chavez, MA, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation
9/27/11
Cultivating Great Learners: Instilling Cognitive and Psychological Characteristics that Promote Students’ Success Vandana Thadani, PhD, Psychology
9/28/11
Teaching with Technology: Examining What is Possible with Online Instruction Todd Shoepe, EdD, MS, CSCS, ACSM - HFS, Health and Human Sciences
9/29/11
Experiencing Virtual Classrooms: A Workshop of Possibilities
Todd Shoepe, EdD, MS, CSCS, ACSM - HFS, Health and Human Sciences
10/4/11
Individual Meetings/Drop-In Sessions with Dr. Sherry Linkon
 
10/4/11
SoTL Showcase Keynote
 
10/4/11
SoTL Showcase Poster Session and Reception  
10/5/11
SoTL Showcase Workshop
 
10/6/11
"Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Teaching at LMU" Panel Discussion Elizabeth Drummond, PhD, History
Kam Dahlquist, PhD, Biology
Susan Scheibler, PhD, Film and Television Studies
Kevin Wetmore, PhD, Theatre Arts and Dance
Michael O'Sullivan, PhD, Psychology
10/7/11
QQSW: Introduction to Sampling and Hypothesis Testing Andrew Healy, PhD, Economics
10/10/11
CBL Brown Bag: Course Integration
10/18/11
Marketplace of Engaged Learning Chris Chapple, PhD, Theological Studies
Holli Levitsky, PhD, History
Eric Strauss, Biology
10/20/11
Information Literacy in the Core Curriculum
Susan Gardner, William H. Hannon Library
Elisa Slater Acosta, William H. Hannon Library
10/25/11
Student Panel Discussion: Teaching Practices & Policies That Transform and Inspire  
10/26/11
Student Engagement & Reflective Learning Wine, Cheese, & Chocolate Discussion  
10/27/11
The Power and Effectiveness of Combining University and Community Knowledge Phil Nyden, PhD, Loyola University of Chicago
10/27/11
CBL Brown Bag: Dos and Don'ts
 
11/4/11
QQSW: Using Excel to Manage and Make Sense of Evidence of Student Learning
Christine Chavez, MA, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation
11/7/11
CBL Brown Bag: CBL Readings for Students  
11/10/11
DSS: Students in the Classroom on the Autism Spectrum Priscilla Levine, MSW, LCSW, Disability Support Services
11/15/11
Faith and Reason: Tensions or Complementarity?
Robert W. Scholla, S.J., Rector, LMU Jesuit Community
11/29/11
Training Students to Become Strategic Thinkers Timothy Cleary, PhD, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
11/29/11
Cultivating an Empowering Instructional Context Timothy Cleary, PhD, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
11/30/11
Student Engagement and Reflective Learning Series Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate Discussion
 
12/1/11
CBL Connect Brown Bag: Course Creation Document
 
12/2/11
QQSW: Statistics as Principled Argument: An Introduction to Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS David Hardy, PhD, Psychology
12/7/11
SoTL Fall Luncheon
 

CBL Tour of Service Locations
Tuesday, August 9, 2011, from 9:15 AM to 2:30 PM

CBL Tour of Service Locations - Agenda

9:15 a.m.    departure from LMU (location: Uhall flagpoles)

10:00          arrival at Downtown Women's Center(DWC) for their Tuesday tour with Steven Alvarez DWC volunteer coordinator

11:00          depart DWC and travel to Homeboy Industries

11:20          arrival at Homeboy Industries- we have a room reserved for lunchtime. I am still working on a speaker/presenter during lunch.

12:30 p.m.  depart Homeboy Industries and Homegirl Cafe and travel to St. Joseph Center in Venice

1:15            arrive at St. Joseph Center for tour of 204 Hampton in Venice with Paul Rubenstein, Director of Development

2:00            tour completed and depart for LMU

2:20           return to LMU

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866


SoTL Brown Bag
Wednesday, August 10, 2011, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Brown Bag Meeting.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866

New Faculty Orientation
Monday, August 15, 2011 to Wednesday, August 17, 2011

New Faculty Orientation

Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Friday, August 26, 2011, from 10:30 AM to 1:30 PM in UNH 3030

Dear LMU Part-Timers,

Welcome to the LMU community. Your contributions are crucial to LMU's teaching mission.

As Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) I would like to offer you assistance, so that you can be a successful teacher who contributes to LMU's goal of academic excellence. Some of you are experienced teachers, others are teaching for the first time at LMU or for the first time ever - your needs may depend on how much teaching experience you have at LMU and elsewhere. We will be inviting you to CTE events during the academic year (see http://www.lmu.edu/cte, in particular, but not only the events calendar, that will be filled by next week). We also would love to hear from you, if there are any specific teaching-related needs or interests you have. I am available for individual consultancies, if you want to work on specific aspects of your teaching, and the CTE administrative coordinator, Nick Mattos (teachers@lmu.edu) can help you identify resources, if you have any questions.

We are offering an orientation this Friday, 8/26, 10:30-12:30, at the CTE (UNH 3030).

We will be covering basic aspects such as:

- Getting ready for the First Day of Teaching (Course Design, Syllabi, etc,),

- Classroom Management,

- Grading and Electronic Tools such as Prowl and Blackboard, plus an opportunity at the end (12:30-1:30) to address individual questions.

Light refreshments and drinks will be available.

If you are planning on attending, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu by tomorrow, Thursday, 8/25, 3pm. In your response, please let us know what department you are teaching in and what class.

Wishing you all a good start into the semester.

Best,

Dorothea Herreiner


CBL Brown Bag Meeting: Reflections
Thursday, September 8, 2011, from 1:45 PM to 2:45 PM

Topic: Reflection Activities

Please send examples of reflection activities in your CBL classes by Wednesday afternoon to teachers@lmu.edu, or bring along on Thursday. We will be discussing future topics and scheduling of Brown Bags.

Light refreshments will be included.

Teaching and Learning in the University Honors Program
Tuesday, September 20, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

Want to teach in the University Honors Program? Come find out how! A panel of honors students and recent honors program faculty discuss the art of teaching and the joy of learning in honors. The new honors core provides many new opportunities for teaching honors students, opening the program to faculty. We want you to join our community! The University Honors Program was created by Clint Albertson, S. J., in 1958. Over the years it has seen many changes and reformulations. Currently, with the Centennial and the coming of a new core, the program yet again has the opportunity to redefine itself. The University Honors Program does not "belong" to any college or school, nor does its offerings "belong" to any department. The program seeks faculty who model intellectual curiosity and a joy of learning. All interested faculty are encouraged to come to this workshop and ask questions and even SIGN UP to teach in the program.

Presented by Brad Elliott Stone, Ph.D., Director University Honors Program

Keywords: University Honors Program, honors students, honors education, honors teaching

Event Flyer
SoTL Brown Bag: Showcase Planning
Wednesday, September 21, 2011, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

Agenda: SoTL Showcase, Lilly West Planning

Bring your lunch, CTE will provide drinks and dessert.
CBL Brown Bag: Sustainability
Thursday, September 22, 2011, from 1:45 PM to 2:45 PM

Topic: Sustainability in CBL Courses

QQSW: Step-by-Step Survey Design: A Practical Guide to Designing Your Survey
Friday, September 23, 2011, from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM

Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW)

Step-by-Step Survey Design: A Practical Guide to Designing Your Survey (Flyer)
Christine Chavez, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation

Thinking of conducting a survey? With careful planning and well-crafted design, a survey can be a powerful and insightful tool. But how do you get started?

This workshop will introduce you to the basic steps of designing a survey. You will also learn about survey ethics and the Institutional Review Board, survey resources available at LMU, and be given a brief introduction to Qualtrics, LMU’s online survey solution.

Refreshments will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

Cultivating Great Learners: Instilling Cognitive and Psychological Characteristics that Promote Students’ Success
Tuesday, September 27, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

Cultivating Great Learners: Instilling Cognitive and Psychological Characteristics that Promote Students’ Success (Flyer)

Presented by CTE Faculty Associate Vandana Thadani, Ph.D.

Students who shine: They love learning, they work hard, they persist even in the face of challenges. And whatever they know about the subject when they enter your classrooms, these students always find a way to learn more and grow. What’s going on in these students’ heads? What cognitive and psychological variables put them above the rest? And how can we help many more of our students develop these qualities? In the first of a series of presentations and discussions in the “Student Engagement and Reflective Learning” program, we’ll explore the research on cognitive and psychological variables that help students excel.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866

Keywords: Student Engagement, Academic Motivation, Reflection, Metacognition

Suggested Reading: Halpern/Hakel, Applying the Science of Learning to the University and Beyond,
Change, Jul/Aug 2003, 35/4, 36-41. http://www.cwu.edu/~gen_ed/halpern.pdf or JSTOR

Presentation Slides (.pdf)

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.

Teaching with Technology: Examining What is Possible with Online Instruction
Wednesday, September 28, 2011, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

Teaching with Technology (Flyer)

We will investigate the recent advances in technological aids that support distance learning. Video clips from synchronous classes will demonstrate the types of interactions and instructional opportunities provided through online software applications such as Adobe Connect and Webex. Virtual classroom data and student survey information will be provided from a recent 100% online summer nutrition course at LMU.

Presented by: Todd Shoepe, Health and Human Sciences, CTE Master Teacher 2011-12

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866

Keywords: online, digital, Adobe Connect, Webex, virtual classroom, distance learning

Links for attendees: Adobe Connect Pro Demo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2syFXr6pRZ8 WebEx Demo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyaWHEF_aWg

Direct Link to Echo Recording:

http://mentor.lmu.edu:8080/ess/echo/presentation/7fcf7b85-bb8c-41eb-afcc-42d0148cea69
(Slides were not captured, but are available as a pdf at this link)

Experiencing Virtual Classrooms: A Workshop of Possibilities
Thursday, September 29, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

Experiencing Virtual Classrooms (Flyer)

We will explore best practices in virtual synchronous instruction through participation in an Adobe Connect classroom. Participants will each have access to the virtual classroom and experience these applications from a student perspective. Teaching philosophy will be the topics that guides our exposure with virtual instruction. Advantages and limitations will be discussed.

Presented by: Todd Shoepe, Health and Human Sciences, CTE Master Teacher 2011-12

This session is hands-on, please bring a laptop. You can also remote into the class like a student would, if you cannot make it to the CTE on Thursday.  Please let us know by email, teachers@lmu.edu, if you wish to do so.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

Keywords: online, digital, Adobe Connect, Webex, virtual classroom, distance learning

Links for attendees: Adobe Connect Pro Demo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2syFXr6pRZ8 WebEx Demo http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyaWHEF_aWg

Adobe Connect Recording of Session http://lmu.adobeconnect.com/p79mwgpvh5c/

Individual Meetings/Drop-In Sessions with Dr. Sherry Linkon
Tuesday, October 04, 2011, from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

Please e-mail teachers@lmu.edu to schedule an appointment with Dr. Linkon. She will be available for 30min meeting times between 9:00am and 11:00am in CTE.

Sherry Lee Linkon is a professor of English and American Studies, and Co-Director of the Center for Working-Class Studies at YSU.  She was a Carnegie Scholar in 1999, and in 2003, she was named Ohio Professor of the Year.  Her book Teaching Working Class (University of Massachusetts, 1999) was named one of the ten best academic books of the 1990s by the readers of Lingua Franca magazine.  She has published articles and an online course portfolio about her research on teaching interdisciplinary analysis in literary and cultural studies, and she has given workshops and presentations on course design, interdisciplinary learning, teaching working-class students, and approaches to scholarship of teaching and learning at colleges and universities around the country.  She recently published a book based on 10 years of SoTL research on students learning in literary studies, Literary Learning: Teaching the English Major (Indiana, 2011). In addition to her work in SoTL, she has been at the forefront of developing New Working-Class Studies.  Her interdisciplinary research on representations, place, and ideas about work appears in articles and in her book, Steeltown USA: Work and Memory in Youngstown (Kansas, 2002), co-authored with John Russo.  She was the founding president of the Working-Class Studies Association.

SoTL Showcase Keynote
Tuesday, October 04, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

ECHO Recording of SoTL Showcase Keynote

Traditionally, faculty have seen our classrooms as separate, even personal spaces. While we recognize that our courses build on what students have learned from colleagues and help prepare them for future learning, few of us spend much time talking with our colleagues about how we teach. We might commiserate with colleagues about the challenge of getting students to do the reading or to get to class on time, but we don’t talk about the real heart of what we do – helping students develop the ability to use core concepts and methods. We’re even less likely to talk in any depth about how we teach or what we teach with people from other disciplines. This talk will consider why we don’t engage in significant dialogues about teaching and how talking – within and across disciplines -- about what we want students to learn and how we facilitate their learning can help us teach better and enrich our academic lives.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.

SoTL Showcase Poster Session and Reception
Tuesday, October 04, 2011, from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM

The poster session offers the opportunity to engage each other in conversations about our teaching, to learn from each other and to be inspired by our colleagues’ teaching experiences across the disciplines. The poster session showcases systematic investigations by LMU faculty into teaching and learning in our classrooms and the assessment of it. It also provides background information on the scholarship of teaching and learning at LMU as well as assessment activities. The CTE will report results from the latest SoTL survey, in particular about our understanding of scholarship of teaching and learning as well the main topics of teaching and learning faculty would like to engage in. The reception with some good finger food and wine will provides a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere in which to meet each other.

SoTL Posters Booklet
S-1 Definitions and Views of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 
Dorothea Herreiner, Center for Teaching Excellence

S-2 Teaching and Student Learning - What We Want to Know 
Dorothea Herreiner, Center for Teaching Excellence

S-3 Revealing the Research Process that Underlies the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) 
Jacqueline Dewar, Mathematics

S-4 Dance Literacy: Learning Dance Notation and Performing a Masterwork 
Teresa Heiland, Dance Program

S-5 Increasing Student Confidence in a Statistics Course: Using Student Data to Design the Curriculum 
Karie Huchting, Educational Leadership

S-6 Will Laban Movement Analysis + Software = 3D Animation Skills? 
Adriana Jaroszewicz, Animation

S-7 Outcomes of a Service-Learning Program Rooted in Social Justice and Pragmatic Constructivism 
Jeffrey Jenkins, School of Ed

S-8 “Doing Good” or “Learning More”: The Role of Reflection in Community-based Learning 
Cathleen McGrath (MGMT) & Maria Alderete (CSA)

S-9 Community-Based Learning Courses at LMU (2003-2010) 
Nora Murphy, Psychology, and Members of the CBL Task Force

S-10 Gender Effects Among Course Grades and Research-Based Content Assessment 
Jeff Phillips & Vince Coletta, Physics

S-11 Teaching with Technology
Todd C. Shoepe, Health and Human Sciences

S-12 Pairing Pre-Service Science Teacher with Environmental Educators to Enhance Environmental Education 
Carolyn Viviano, (HHS) Maria Alderete (CSA), Meredith McCarthy, Catie Boarts, Sara Laimon, Matthew Morrissey

Assessment Posters
A-1 Teaching, Learning and Assessment: Unlocking the Connections 
Laura Massa and McKenzie Sweeny, Institutional Assessment

A-2 Closing the Loop: Assessing LMU’s Undergraduate Learning Outcomes 
Laura Massa and McKenzie Sweeny, Institutional Assessment

A-3 Finding the Link: The Capstone Course and the APAM Minors 
Edward Park (APAM), Curtiss Rooks (APAM), Stella Oh (WNST), Connie Chen (HIST)

A-4 LMU Chinese Minor Assessment Plan 
Chan Lu, Modern Languages and Literatures

A-5 The NEW Economics Assessment Plan 
Jennifer Pate, Economics

A-6 New Curriculum Improved Assessment 
Chun I Lee, Finance

A-7 Undergraduate Screenwriting Program Assessment 
Marilyn Beker, Beth Serlin, and Jeffrey Davis, Screenwriting

A-8 Theological Studies Graduate Programs 
Jonathan Rothchild, David Sanchez, and Charlotte Radler, Theological Studies

Please let us know whether you plan to attend so that we can make sure we have enough refreshments: teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.


SoTL Showcase Workshop
Wednesday, October 05, 2011, from 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM

ECHO Recording of SoTL Showcase Workshop

LMU’s new core curriculum invites faculty to develop interdisciplinary courses of several kinds. It builds on a widely-accepted idea that students benefit from interdisciplinary learning and from courses that help them make connections across the curriculum. The idea is wise, but moving from idea to practice is a challenge. While many faculty identify their work as interdisciplinary, they define that concept in many different ways. Others feel uncomfortable teaching outside of their areas of expertise. We don’t think we know enough, or we worry about getting things wrong. So we have a paradox: we want to offer good interdisciplinary courses but we don’t necessarily know how. Team teaching is one way of solving the problem, and when developed thoughtfully, team-taught courses can help faculty gain confidence in working beyond their disciplinary boundaries. Collaboratively-designed courses, whether taught by multiple faculty or taught individually by members of a team that planned the course together, can not only help student learn but also give faculty rich opportunities for expanding our perspectives, developing relationships beyond our departments, and gaining fresh insight on our own fields. To make it work, we need to find ways to frame deep, critical, intentional conversations and to translate those conversations into concrete course plans. Participants in this workshop will learn about and practice some concrete strategies for learning together to design effective and truly interdisciplinary courses.

RSVP for this workshop.

"Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Teaching at LMU" Panel Discussion
Thursday, October 06, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

"Making Connections: Interdisciplinary Teaching at LMU" Panel Discussion

Link to Echo Recording:
http://mentor.lmu.edu:8080/ess/echo/presentation/af6a6722-ac9a-41ef-8828-02fe7537d0fd

We will be hearing about examples of successful and fascinating interdisciplinary classes that are being taught at LMU, discuss the opportunities and challenges of such classes, envision new classes and projects to be undertaken, and also consider the support necessary for such interdisciplinary teaching. We hope to have a broad discussion involving all participants.

Panelists:

Elizabeth Drummond, History, “History & Literature of the Holocaust” (team taught with Holli Levistky)
Kam Dahlquist, Biology, “Biological Databases” (team taught with John Dionisi)
Sue Scheibler, Film and Television Studies, ”Embodiment of Mind and Meditative Gaze” (team taught with Robin Wang)
Kevin Wetmore, Department of Theatre Arts and Dance, "Catholic Spirit in Drama"
Mike O'Sullivan, Psychology, Science and Religion: Psychological Perspectives

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310) 338-5866.
QQSW: Introduction to Sampling and Hypothesis Testing
Friday, October 07, 2011, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Introduction to Sampling and Hypothesis Testing
Andrew Healy, PhD, Economics

In this workshop, we will discuss simple ways of describing and summarizing data. We will start by going over the most basic ways of capturing what data can tell us: histograms, means, and standard deviations. After these methods, we will discuss the ideas of using samples to understand populations, along with how to use samples in any field to test hypotheses. For example, in economics, we might want to use a sample of households to determine whether it was generally true that losing a job causes people to be more likely to divorce. Hypothesis testing methods enable us to determine both an answer to this question and an estimate of how certain we are of that answer.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

This event is part of a series of Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshops (QQSW) hosted by the CTE, supporting the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) at LMU.

CBL Brown Bag: Course Integration
Monday, October 10, 2011, from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Topic: Course Integration

Marketplace of Engaged Learning
Tuesday, October 18, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

Marketplace of Engaged Learning
Survey / Survey of Attendees / Engaged Learning at LMU Survey Results

How are we engaging our students in classes? What activities, pedagogies, and class designs do we rely on in our classes? What do we mean when we talk about engaged learning?
We will showcase and discuss the many different versions of engaged learning that are already going on at LMU, that we are thinking about, or that we would like to develop. We will be sharing experiences from different classes and discussing opportunities for future classes. The discussion offers an opportunity to provide input to the core requirement working group that will determine what constitutes an engaged learning flag in the future.

Panelists: Dr. Chris Chapple, Theological Studies, Dr. Holli Levitsky, History, and Dr. Eric Strauss, Biology

Lunch will be included, RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.
Information Literacy in the Core Curriculum
Thursday, October 20, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

Event Flyer

ECHO Recording of Presentation

Presentation Slides  (.pdf)

Students today grew up in the information age, with information constantly at their fingertips. They approach research expecting it to be fast and easy, and look to Google as the main authority. An important part of a college education is learning how to evaluate information sources more critically. Because of the staggering amount of information now readily available, today’s students need more guidance than ever at being able to judge different kinds of “arguments” or “proof.” Finding information is easy, but they need to know how to evaluate the quality of their information sources and where to get the “good” information. The proposed Core Curriculum will formalize and require the incorporation of important information literacy training that is currently only provided at the request of faculty. The Library is here to help you incorporate information literacy learning outcomes in First Year Seminar, Rhetorical Arts, and Flagged courses at LMU!

Presented by Susan Gardner and Elisa Slater Acosta, William H. Hannon Library

Keywords: information literacy, research, core curriculum, flagged courses

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5886.

Background links for attendees: http://libguides.lmu.edu/infoliteracy (note that readings/bibliography also on here)

Student Panel Discussion: Teaching Practices & Policies That Transform and Inspire
Tuesday, October 25, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM

Event Flyer

If you talk with our students it’s clear that they’re having some extraordinary learning experiences in their courses at LMU. In this panel discussion, students will share their perspectives about teaching practices that have transformed them: their learning habits, their views of themselves, or their views of the world. Our discussion will push beyond issues of professors’ personalities to explore specifics—the teaching practices and policies that have inspired students to stretch intellectually, embrace (or at least, not reject!) intellectual challenge and academic rigor, and love learning.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5886.

Keywords: Student Panel, Teaching, Learning

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.
Student Engagement & Reflective Learning Wine, Cheese, & Chocolate Discussion
Wednesday, October 26, 2011, from 3:45 PM to 5:15 PM in the Marymount Center

Event Flyer

Come share your ideas and experiences around the topics of teaching and learning. What goals do we have for student learning, and what challenges do we face in achieving them? What pedagogical strategies have we each developed that help us teach a particularly difficult concept, build the classroom culture we want, stimulate discussion, change our students’ capacity to learn, etc.? Through informal discussions, we’ll share successes, strategies, challenges, and barriers related to issues and questions like those above. Join your colleagues to chat, reconnect, eat and drink, or just absorb.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.

The Power and Effectiveness of Combining University and Community Knowledge
Thursday, October 27, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM in UNH 3030

The Power and Effectiveness of Combining University and Community Knowledge (Flyer)
ECHO Recording of Presentation

Presentation slides are available upon request at teachers@lmu.edu.

Presented by: Dr. Phil Nyden (Bio)
Professor of Sociology and Director
Center for Urban Research and Learning , Loyola University of Chicago

In a new model of teaching and learning, Community Research and Learning (CURL) of Loyola University Chicago promotes partnerships between Loyola researchers (faculty and students) and Chicago community groups, city‐wide organizations, and government throughout the Chicago metropolitan region. CURL’s model of collaborative research and teaching stresses active engagement between the community and the university. Such collaborations link the skills and wisdom present within every community with the specialized knowledge and academic discipline of a vital urban university. Working together, community needs are addressed and the academic experience is enriched. What can LMU learn from this model as we seek to strengthen our connection to Los Angeles and expand our use of engaged learning in our courses?

Philip Nyden will talk about collaborative university research approaches that brings together university knowledge and community knowledge.   Specifically, he will discuss the work of the Loyola University Chicago Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL) and strategies for developing stronger university-community research networks.   CURL was established in 1996 and grew out of a process that consciously brought together university and community partners in tackling pressing policy issues in Chicago – particularly those facing low-income communities, communities of color, and other marginalized groups.   CURL does not do research on the community, rather it does research with the community.   It regularly works on a broad range of projects from evaluating citywide programs to end homelessness to the economic impact of big box developments on low-income communities.   A number of the projects will be discussed during the talk.

Nyden is Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL) at Loyola University Chicago.   CURL is a non-traditional research center at that involves community partners in all stages of research from conceptualization and research design to data analysis and report dissemination. Much of Nyden’s work utilizes this collaborative university-community methodological approach; he has written extensively on this subject.  Among his publications are: Public Sociology: Research, Action and Change (Pine Forge Press, just published);   Building Community: Social Science in Action, (Pine Forge Press, 1997); and "Collaborative Research: Harnessing the Tensions Between Researcher and Practitioner" which appeared in The American Sociologist.  Nyden has done substantial research on what produces stable racially, ethnically, and economically diverse communities in the U.S. and is currently working on a follow-up to a 1998 national, nine-city study funded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and published as a dedicated issue of HUD’s policy journal, Cityscape. He is involved in activist researcher networks linking community-based research across regional and national boundaries. Nyden is part of a founding group of the Jesuit Research Action Network, bringing together community-engaged researchers at Jesuit colleges and universities. With colleagues at the University of Technology Sydney Shopfront (Australia) and CURL, he co-edits a peer-reviewed journal, Gateways: International Journal of Community Research and Engagement.

Co-sponsored by: Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts
The Center for Teaching Excellence
The Center for Service and Action

Lunch will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

CBL Brown Bag: Dos and Don'ts
Thursday, October 27, 2011, from 1:45 PM to 2:45 PM in UNH 3030

Discussion of the Dos and Don'ts document (Draft) that has been put together by participants of the CBL Brown Bag group.

QQSW: Using Excel to Manage and Make Sense of Evidence of Student Learning
Friday, November 04, 2011, from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM in WHH 118

Using Excel to Manage and Make Sense of Evidence of Student Learning (Event Flyer)
Christine Chavez, Manager of Surveys and Evaluation

You’ve collected the evidence of student learning. What’s next?

In Excel for Assessment 101 you’ll learn how to transform scored rubrics, completed surveys, exam responses, and more, into meaningful assessment data. We will guide you through the basics of using Microsoft Excel for data management and analysis, and give you the opportunity to work hands-on with sample data.


CBL Brown Bag: CBL Readings for Students
Monday, November 07, 2011, from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM in UNH 3030

CBL Readings for Students, i.e. readings that instructors can use in their classes to give to students to better understand the CBL experience and expectations.

DSS: Students in the Classroom on the Autism Spectrum
Thursday, November 10, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM in UNH 3030

Disability Support Services: Students in the Classroom on the Autism Spectrum (Event Flyer)

Disability Support Services invites you to attend a presentation on working with students on The Autism Spectrum.  Discussion will include personal examples and experiences in the classroom, when working with this challenging population. Panelists include staff from the DSS Office.

Priscilla F. Levine, MSW, LCSW
Director | Disability Support Services | Loyola Marymount University
Daum Hall |  MS 8208  |  One LMU Drive | Los Angeles, CA 90045-2659

Handouts:
Fact Sheet: Asperger Syndrome
Faculty Guide for Working with Student with Asperger Syndrome


Faith and Reason: Tensions or Complementarity?
Tuesday, November 15, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM in UNh 3030

Presented By: Robert W. Scholla, S.J. (Event Flyer)

“The Core invites students to analyze their relationship with themselves, others, the world and God. The Core serves faith by bringing students to a critical and appreciative understanding of religious traditions, and to see the search for God as intrinsic to the human condition.”
 
The phrase, “the Core serves faith,” is a complex and indeed potentially confusing one.   Outside of courses in theological studies and, possibly, philosophy, how might our core curriculum “serve faith”?   What “faith” does the Core serve?  How can the questions of faith enliven our academic pursuit of intelligibility, meaning and excellence, and energize our interaction with students and one another?
 
In the everyday, questions of faith are often framed in language and concepts that belong to particular religious traditions.  This too easily inhibits mutual understanding and respectful conversation.  This noon-time colloquium will strive to explore the foundational experiences of existence that impel all human inquiry.  We will discuss the tensions which have historically fueled controversies about the relationship between faith and rationality, and also attend to perennial questions:  the meaning and mystery of self, other and the world, matters which lead to considerations of the ultimate horizons of human life.

This presentation will offer the opportunity for faculty from diverse academic disciplines and with various stances toward religious faith to consider the statement, “the Core serves faith,” as a rich opportunity to review their curriculum and its goals and for ongoing departmental and inter-department discussion.
 
A UNIVERSITY CORE THAT SERVES FAITH HONORS INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY; AND A UNIVERSITY CORE THAT SERVES INTELLECTUAL INQUIRY HONORS FAITH.


Bio:

Robert W. Scholla, S.J. is a native of Los Angeles and a graduate of Loyola High School. Before entering the Society of Jesus, he did undergraduate studies in Biology at the University of Southern California and graduate work in Education at the University of California in Berkeley.
 
As a Jesuit, he obtained his M.A. in Mediaeval Philosophy from Fordham University and later spent seven years working and studying inRome where he completed his Doctorate in Sacred Theology at the Pontifical Gregorian University.
 
Father Scholla is passionate about education and, while at Loyola Marymount University, he has taught in the Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, the School of Education and Loyola Law School.  Since 2006 he has served as the Rector of the Jesuit Community at LMU.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP toteachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.


Training Students to Become Strategic Thinkers: Research, Theory, and Applications
Tuesday, November 29, 2011, from 12:15 PM to 1:15 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer
Presentation Slides (pdf)
ECHO Recording of Presentation

Self-regulated learning (SRL) refers to a process involving the proactive and systematic planning, use, and adaptation of specific strategies during learning activities. Students who are more self-regulated tend to be more goal-directed, self-aware, and motivated to engage in the learning process. These students are also more likely to persist when faced with academic challenges and are highly strategic as they attempt to optimize their learning. Of particular importance is that over the past couple of decades many researchers have shown self-regulatory processes to reliably and consistently differentiate high and low achievers. Attendees of this presentation will learn about self-regulated learning (SRL) theory and its’ application to academic settings. Particular emphasis will be placed on illustrating the characteristics and key processes of the self-regulated learner as well as tips for optimizing and facilitating students’ strategic and self-directed behaviors in a college context. Attendees will be given the opportunity to ask questions about how self-regulation and motivation constructs can be applied to their areas of specialty.

Lunch will be included, please RSVP toteachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

Timothy Cleary, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Timothy J. Cleary is an Associate Professor and Training Director of the School Psychology program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Professor Cleary’s primary areas of research and professional interest include the development and evaluation of self-regulation/motivation assessment tools and intervention programs applied to academic, athletic, and clinical contexts. He has developed an innovative assessment technique called Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) Microanalysis as well as a tutoring intervention program to enhance students’ strategic skills and academic achievement (Self-Regulation Empowerment Program (SREP)). Dr. Cleary has also explored current trends in school psychology assessment, intervention, and consultation practices and has engaged in national and international consultation activities to improve educational and clinical practices of teachers, school psychologists and medical education professionals.

Dr. Cleary will also hold a workshop from 3 - 5pm on "Cultivating an Empowering Instructional Context: The Role of Self-Reflection and Process Feedback"

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.

Cultivating an Empowering Instructional Context
Tuesday, November 29, 2011, from 3:00 PM to 5:00 PM in UNH 3030

Event Flyer
Presentation Slides (pdf)
ECHO Recording of Presentation

Self-regulated learning (SRL) refers to a process involving the proactive and systematic planning, use, and adaptation of specific strategies in specific learning contexts. Across the developmental spectrum, SRL interventions have been shown to reliably improve students’ basic academic skills as well as their ability to study, manage their time, and to cope effectively with the complex demands of high school and college settings. These interventions have also been shown to improve students’ perceptions of self-efficacy, interest in school, and the extent to which they value learning. Instructors can impact these regulatory and motivation processes by teaching students how to reflect adaptively on their successes and failures and to provide students feedback that nurtures their strategic skills and motivation. In this workshop, attendees will learn how to translate SRL theory into simple yet powerful instructional tactics and practices. Real-world examples of “SRL in practice” will be provided, with particular emphasis placed on strategies for engaging in reflection discussions during class lectures and for providing process and self-regulatory feedback on assignments and projects. Attendees will also have the opportunity to actively participate in break-out group activities to practice applying self-regulation concepts to their instructional content areas and domains.

Refreshments will be included, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.
Timothy Cleary, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Timothy J. Cleary is an Associate Professor and Training Director of the School Psychology program at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Professor Cleary’s primary areas of research and professional interest include the development and evaluation of self-regulation/motivation assessment tools and intervention programs applied to academic, athletic, and clinical contexts. He has developed an innovative assessment technique called Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) Microanalysis as well as a tutoring intervention program to enhance students’ strategic skills and academic achievement (Self-Regulation Empowerment Program (SREP)). Dr. Cleary has also explored current trends in school psychology assessment, intervention, and consultation practices and has engaged in national and international consultation activities to improve educational and clinical practices of teachers, school psychologists and medical education professionals.

Dr. Cleary will also give a keynote address from 12:15 - 1:15pm on "Training Students to Become Strategic Thinkers: Research, Theory, and Applications"

This presentation is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.


Student Engagement and Reflective Learning Series - Wine, Cheese, and Chocolate Discussion
Wednesday, November 30, 2011, from 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM

Come to the second in (hopefully) a series of wine and cheese events for connecting with colleagues around the topics of teaching and learning. What goals do we have for student learning, and what challenges do we face in achieving them? What pedagogical strategies have we each developed that help us teach a particularly difficult concept, build the classroom culture we want, stimulate discussion, change our students’ capacity to learn, etc.? Through informal discussions, we’ll share successes, strategies, challenges, and barriers related to issues and questions like those above. The last event was a low-key, lovely chance to sit and chat (over well-selected eats & drinks) about things we experience in our courses, but don't always have a chance to discuss with our peers. Join your colleagues to chat, reconnect, eat and drink, or just absorb.

Refreshments will be provided, please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

This event is part of Vandana Thadani's Faculty Associate project on Student Engagement and Reflective Learning.

CBL Connect Brown Bag: Course Creation Document
Thursday, December 01, 2011, from 1:45 PM to 2:45 PM in UNH 3030

Discussion of CBL Course Creation Document from CSA along with Dos and Don'ts Document

Email teachers@lmu.edu with any contributions prior to the meeting.

QQSW: Statistics as Principled Argument: An Introduction to Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
Friday, December 02, 2011, from 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM in UNH 3030

Statistics as Principled Argument: An Introduction to Descriptive and Inferential Statistics on SPSS
David Hardy, Ph.D., Psychology

This workshop will provide introductory instruction on database management, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics (hypothesis testing). We will be using SPSS, a popular statistical software program.  Instruction on SPSS will be integrated with an overarching conceptual theme that statistics can help you make (or criticize) more strongly an argument. The simplest argument is to merely describe a set of data in answer to a question. For example, how much time do students at LMU spend on studying? Basic descriptive statistics such as measures of central tendency and variability will be covered. Time permitting, inferential statistics will also be introduced, where more complex and interesting arguments can be made and a hypothesis tested. For example, you want to test the (perhaps commonsensical) hypothesis that time spent studying is associated with college grade point average (an answer is provided at the workshop!). The strength of your results and argument will also be discussed. Handouts will be provided along with demonstration exercises.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or (310)338-5866.

This event is part of the Quantitative and Qualitative Skills Workshop (QQSW) series.
SoTL Fall Luncheon
Wednesday, December 07, 2011, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in UNH 3030

The CTE will provide lunch for the SoTL group for this end of semester luncheon.

RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu.