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Event Information

For details about events, including abstract, bios, links to handouts, recordings, and other material, follow the links below. Event information gets updated on a regular basis. Please contact us at teachers@lmu.edu with any questions or suggestions.

Past Semesters: [Fall 2014]    [Spring 2014]    [Fall 2013]    [Spring 2013]    [Fall 2012]    [Spring 2012]    [Fall 2011]

Date  Event Speaker(s)/Presenter(s) 
1/7/15
Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, Director, CTE 
1/8/15 to
1/10/15
Regional Reacting to the Past Conference
Mark Higbee, PhD, Eastern Michigan University
Mark Carnes, PhD, Barnard College
Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, CTE
1/12/15 Short Part-Time Faculty Orientation Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, CTE
1/22/15
Raising Expectations for Higher Academic Achievement
Henry Gradillas, PhD
1/29/15
Teaching to a Diverse Crowd: Social Psychological Lessons on Negotiating Diverse Student Identities in the Classroom
Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
2/3/15 A More International LMU: Changing Student Body and Classrooms
Denise Folga, OISS
Dorothea Herreiner, CTE
Csilla Samay, International Outreach
2/12/15 Focusing on LMU’s Undergraduate Learning Outcomes: Habit of Service and Civic Knowledge & Engagement Laura Massa, PhD, Assessment
2/23/15 Increasing Diversity in Computer Science: Harvey Mudd College and UC Berkeley (CREATE-STEM) Colleen Lewis, PhD, Computer Science, Harvey Mudd College
2/24/15
The View from out There: Students Speak to their Experiences of Identity in the Classroom
Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
LMU Student Panel
2/26/15 Teaming Up: Students and Faculty Mentors Discuss Undergraduate Research Carla Bittel, PhD, Undergraduate Research
LMU Faculty and Student Panel
3/3/15 Role Playing and Simulations Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, CTE, et al
3/9/15 to
3/20/15
Open Classroom Weeks LMU Faculty
3/13/15 Maintaining Quality and Rigor within Digital Learning Environments Daniel Soodjinda, PhD, Liberal Studies + Teacher Education, CalState Stanislaus
3/17/15 Overcoming Student Anxiety and Improving Outcomes in Research Methods Courses Lisa Mueller, PhD, Political Science
3/19/15
Teaching Cultural Diversity: LMU Faculty Share Lessons and Lessons Learned
Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
LMU Faculty Panel
3/23/15 Re-imagining the Mathematics Classroom: Preparing Students and Teachers for Mathematics Success (Create-STEM) Carolee Koehn Hurtado, PhD, Center X, UCLA
3/24/15 Rigor and Respect: The Politics of Relationship in Pedagogical Practice Michael Montoya, PhD, Anthropology + Chicano/a + Latino/a Studies, UC Irvine
3/25/15 Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People to Fill Out Your Survey Christine Chavez, Survey Research
4/7/15
Infusing Privilege and Intersectionality across the Diversity Curriculum
Kim Case, PhD, Psychology, University of Houston Clear Lake
4/7/15
Workshop: Privilege and Intersectionality in Your Classroom
Kim Case, PhD, Psychology, University of Houston Clear Lake
4/10/15 Teaching-with-Technology Day Keynote Speaker: Michelle Miller, Northern Arizona University
4/13/15 Ten Teaching Tips (CREATE-STEM) Vince Coletta, PhD, Physics
4/14/15 Why Teach? A Discussion of a Selection of Essays by Mark Edmundson Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
Nadia Kim, PhD, Sociology
4/20/15 Aiding Grading: Team-Based Learning and Peer Evaluation? Deborah Rifkin, PhD, Music, Ithaca College

Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 from 8:30am to 5:00pm in UNH 3030

During the Part‐Time Faculty Orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • LMU’s Mission + History
  • Getting Ready for Class
  • LMU’s Students
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU
  • Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, …
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How - Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, …
  • Course Development, Teaching and Learning Strategies
  • Syllabus and Assignment Workshop 
During lunch you will have the opportunity to meet representatives from several LMU offices that can support you in your teaching, such as:
  • Academic Resource Center
  • Center for Service and Action
  • Disability Support Services
  • First Year Experience
  • Hannon Library
  • Human Resources
  • Information Technology Services
  • LMU Bookstore
  • Mission and Ministry
  • Parking
  • Public Safety
  • Registrar
  • Student Psychological Services
Alternative Date: 12/12/2014

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Reacting-to-the-Past Regional Conference
Thursday, January 8, 2015, 2:00pm - 6:30pm
Friday, January 9, 2015, 9:00am - 6:30pm
Saturday, January 10, 2015, 9:00am - 2:00pm

Event Flyer

Get to know the engaging and highly successful pedagogy of Reacting to the Past by experiencing the student perspective and discussing pedagogical options and challenges of this pedagogy.
Experience a game yourself and learn about the wide variety of available shorter and longer games from many geographical areas, time periods, and subject areas.
Appreciate the versatility of the games, and the breadth of topics and wide array of learning outcomes they address.
Encounter an open-minded and very supportive faculty community that is developing and teaching with Reacting to the Past.

Do you want your students
  • to deeply read and understand texts,
  • to truly own and inhabit concepts,
  • to carefully argue in writing and speaking,
  • to get engaged and excited about topics?
Explore Reacting to the Past for classes in all disciplines by participating in one of these two games:
  • Charles Darwin, the Copley Medal, and the Rise of Naturalism, 1862-64.
  • Frederick Douglass, Slavery, Abolitionism, and the Constitution, 1845.
For details and to register, go to: https://reacting.barnard.edu/events/regional-faculty-conference-loyola-marymount-university.  LMU faculty and administrators: Contact the CTE for registration information at teachers@lmu.edu.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.
Short Part-Time Faculty Orientation
Monday, January 12, 2015 from 9:00am to 12:30pm in UNH 3030

During the Part‐Time Faculty Orientation, we will be covering topics such as
  • Academic Rules and Procedures at LMU
  • Syllabus, Grading, Academic Honesty, Course Evaluations, …
  • FERPA, What, Why, and How - Federal Law: Record Privacy and Security, PROWL
  • MYLMUConnect (Blackboard) – Communication, Collaboration, Document Sharing, Assessment, …
Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

>Raising Expectations for Higher Academic Achievement
Thursday, January 22, 2015, 12:15pm - 1:30pm

Event Flyer

Presented by: Henry Gradillas, PhD

The need to expose students to high standards, and strategies used, to encourage and expect students to achieve such standards will be outlined. What challenges do educators face during the implementation of higher standards and what methods should be adopted to effectively overcome such challenges? I will show how to successfully motivate all students by having higher expectations and offering a stricter and more relevant curriculum. Methods of enhancing the learning process by using more creative and challenging teaching strategies will be discussed. A variety of ways will be explored in attempts to keep more minority student s in the educational system in both high school and college.

Dr. Henry Gradillas served as the Principal of Garfield High School during the period depicted in the film "Stand and Deliver" about Jamie Escalante's success and challenges in helping students achieve unheard-of success in calculus. Among others, Dr. Gradillas was a Commissioner for the National Commission on Drug Free Schools with Secretary Lauro F. Cavazos and Dr. William J. Bennet as Co-Chairs under President Bush Sr., Special Consultant on the staff of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction with Dr. Bill Honig, Sacramento California, Principal at several other high schools in California and Michigan, a Motivational Speaker independently and for the College Board, and a Ranch Manager of a 960 Acre Fruit Tree business. Dr. Gradillas is author of “Standing and Delivering: What the Movie Didn’t Tell You,” where he introduces his philosophy of education and the practical school management techniques that help students achieve success through a rigorous education and enthusiasm.
Dr. Gradillas grew up in the Barrios of East L. A. California initially speaking only Spanish. He graduated Roosevelt High School where he had been very active in ROTC and achieved the highest honor – All City Cadet Colonel. He attended UC Davis where he graduated with a BS in Agronomy. At age 50 he returned to college and received his Doctorate in Education Specializing in Secondary Curriculum from BYU. Living in northern Wisconsin with his wife Gayle, he still finds teaching rewarding and continues to teach and tutor at-risk kids. One of his favorite things is hearing that former students are achieving their goals in life.

ECHO Recording

This presentation is part of Nadia Kim's Faculty Associate project on Achieving a Rigorous Education that Satisfies Teacher and Learner.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Teaching to a Diverse Crowd: Social Psychological Lessons on Negotiating Diverse Student Identities in the Classroom
Thursday, January 29, 2015, 12:15pm - 1:30pm

Event Flyer

Presented by: Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology, LMU

Initiatives focused on increasing diversity in higher education have in part succeeded, creating classrooms where an array of identities is present. Importantly, these identities are not inert and play out in complex ways affecting the experiences of students and faculty alike. Do you believe in a color blind approach to teaching (and perhaps life)? Do you sometimes think it would be best if we could all just identify as human instead of segregating into distinct subgroups? Do you assume that you are unbiased in your interactions with students? Using theory and data from social psychology, Adam Fingerhut will shed light on questions such as these and will discuss effective (and simultaneously ineffective) ways to handle identity in the classroom. (Hint: If you answered yes to the above questions, the data are not going to be in your favor).

This lecture serves as the inaugural piece in Dr. Fingerhut’s four-part series on Diversity in the Classroom which he is presenting in his role as CTE Faculty Associate.

Presentation Slides
ECHO Recording

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

A More International LMU: Changing Student Body and Classrooms
Tuesday, February 3, 2015, 12:15pm - 1:30pm

Event Flyer

Presented by:
Denise Folga, OISS
Dorothea Herreiner, CTE
Csilla Samary, International Outreach

We will consider the strategies, facts, opportunities, and challenges associated with LMU’s growing international student body as the classroom structure and learning environment evolves; and we invite colleagues to bring along and share their suggestions, questions, concerns, and experiences. We will explore questions such as: How many international students does LMU have and where do they come from? What is LMU’s strategic goal for international enrollment? How are international students recruited and admitted? How do they do once they are at LMU? What do they bring and what challenges do they face? How can we as instructors best adapt teaching to meet their needs and integrate what they have to offer? What are challenges instructors may experience and how can they be addressed? How can our students’ diverse backgrounds enhance learning and critical thinking in class?

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Focusing on LMU’s Undergraduate Learning Outcomes: Habit of Service and Civic Knowledge & Engagement
Thursday, February 12, 2015, 12:15pm - 1:30pm

Event Flyer

Presented by: Laura Massa, Assessment

Do our students develop a habit of service? How capable are they of making connections between what they’ve learned and the actions they take to promote justice in the world?
Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Increasing Diversity in Computer Science: Harvey Mudd College and UC Berkeley (CREATE-STEM)
Monday, February 23, 3:00pm-4:00pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Colleen Lewis, PhD, Computer Science, Harvey Mudd College

At Harvey Mudd College 40% of CS majors are women and at UC Berkeley the percentage of CS majors who are women has nearly doubled in the last 10 years. Professor Colleen Lewis has participated in designing, implementing, and evaluating diversity initiatives at both institutions. She will share her experiences and discuss how the interventions at each institution were shaped by local factors and educational research.

Colleen Lewis is a professor of computer science at Harvey Mudd College who specializes in computer science education. Lewis researches how people learn computer science and how people feel about learning computer science. Her research seeks to identify effective teaching practices for creating equitable learning spaces where all students have the opportunity to learn. Lewis curates CSTeachingTips.org, a NSF-sponsored project for disseminating effective computer science teaching practices (i.e. CS pedagogical content knowledge).

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

The View from Out There: Students Speak to Their Experiences of Identity in the Classroom
Tuesday, February 24, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated by: Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
Panel of LMU Students

Though we, as faculty, interact with students every day and share space with them, we are often unaware of their thoughts and feelings about what they are experiencing in the classroom. Over the years, I have tried to remedy this by engaging students in conversations about how they experience their identities in the classroom. Specifically, we have conversed about the ways in which solo-status (i.e., being the only one of a particular group in the room) and stereotypes affect participation and learning, and about ways in which faculty and peers create safe or unsafe spaces for learning and transformation to occur. Inspired by and building on these conversations, this panel presentation will give students from a variety of groups and backgrounds an opportunity to speak to and with us about their experiences of identity in the classroom. Though the session will begin with students discussing their experiences, the majority of the time will be spent in dialogue.

This panel discussion is part of Adam Fingerhut’s Faculty Associate project on Diversity in the Classroom.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Teaming Up: Students and Faculty Mentors Discuss Undergraduate Research
Thursday, February 26, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer


Panelists:
Timothy Huffman, PhD, Communication Studies (CFA) + Christopher Franco
Nancy Fujishige, PhD, Biology (CSE) + Genevieve Guerra
Anna Harrison, PhD, Theological Studies (BCLA) + Catherine Perl

Moderated by:
Carla Bittel, PhD, History
Martina Ramirez, PhD, Biology

Undergraduate involvement in faculty-mentored scholarly research and creative activities (SRCA) provides a window on scholarship and creativity in the making, allowing students to participate in discipline-specific practices related to the production of new knowledge and creative outcomes. Faculty mentors guide students in their engagement in such activities, helping them develop over time into proficient scholars and creators in their fields. Yet, this vital student-faculty interaction does not arise by chance, and once underway, is not without its surprises and challenges for both students and faculty members. In this panel, student-faculty pairs engaged in diverse forms of SRCA will discuss how their partnerships originated and developed, as well as the challenges and rewards they each experienced along the way. This will be an interactive session, with the panelists responding to questions from the audience and from the moderators.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Role Playing and Simulations
Tuesday, March 3, 2015, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer


Contributions from:
Véronique Flambard-Weisbart, PhD, French
Richard Fox, PhD, Political Science
John Parrish, PhD, Political Science
Yanjie Wang, PhD, Asian and Pacific Studies
Katerina Zacharia, PhD, Classics

Moderated by: Dorothea Herreiner, PhD, CTE

Based on show-and-tell inspired short presentations by several LMU faculty, we will explore different forms, opportunities, and the outcomes of role playing and simulations in courses.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Open Classrooms Week
March 9 - March 20, 2015

Details TBD

Maintaining Quality and Rigor within Digital Learning Environments
Friday, March 13, 2015, 12:00pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Daniel Soodjinda, EdD, Liberal Studies and Teacher Education, CalState Stanislaus

As the demand for online and hybrid courses grows, it is important to define quality teaching and learning that can maintain the rigor of face-to-face classroom experiences. This, however, can be challenging because many faculty members lack the technical savvy and pedagogical knowledge required for effective online course development. This workshop will provide participants an opportunity to examine extemporary practices that support rigor in online learning environments, and the challenges and opportunities that come with them. Faculty will leave the workshop equipped with knowledge that will help maintain and assess rigor through technological tools and pedagogical strategies that supports the design and delivery of online or hybrid courses.

Dr. Daniel Soodjinda is currently an assistant professor of Liberal Studies and Teacher Education at California State University (CSU), Stanislaus. He uses a lens of equity and social justice to teach graduate and undergraduate students in educational foundations, curriculum development, instructional technology, and educational policy. More recently, Dr. Soodjinda was appointed to direct the California State University's (CSU) Digital Ambassador program, a position that is charged with supporting faculty and teacher candidates in utilizing online and computer-based resources to support enriched blended learning experiences. His Twitter handle is @TheTeacherProf.

Please bring a laptop or let us know that you would like us to get one for you.

This presentation is part of Nadia Kim's Faculty Associate project on Achieving a Rigorous Education that Satisfies Teacher and Learner.

Presentation Slides
QOLT Form
ECHO Recording

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Overcoming Student Anxiety and Improving Outcomes in Research Methods Courses
Tuesday, March 17, 2015, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Lisa Mueller, PhD, Political Science

This workshop offers practical tips on helping students overcome fear and anxiety about research methods courses. It is intended for instructors from all disciplines. We will examine empirical studies on the undergraduate methods experience and view samples of effective syllabi. An interactive brainstorming session will allow instructors to consider learning objectives and class activities to give students fulfilling methodological training that travels to other courses.

Presentation Slides
Sample Syllabi

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Teaching Cultural Diversity: LMU Faculty Share Lessons and Lessons Learned
Thursday, March 19, 2015, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated by: Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology
Panel of LMU Faculty:
Fernando Estrada, PhD, Educational Support Service
Lily Khadjavi, PhD, Mathematics
Sina Kramer, PhD, Women's Studies
Einat Metzl, PhD, Marital and Family Therapy
Ed Park, PhD, Asian Pacific American Studies

Part of a multicultural education is creating a community where varied identities are represented and respected. Another part is teaching about diversity as a content issue. In this panel presentation, faculty from within the LMU community who teach about identity, diversity, culture, and/or multiculturalism will share their experiences with us. Lessons (in the form of practical tips about choosing and structuring content) and lessons learned (in the form of success stories and, dare we say, failures) will be provided.

This panel discussion is part of Adam Fingerhut’s Faculty Associate project on Diversity in the Classroom.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Re-imagining the Mathematics Classroom: Preparing Students and Teachers for Mathematics Success
Monday, March 23, 2015, 3:00pm-4:00pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Carolee Koehn Hurtado, PhD, Director of Mathematics Programs @ UCLA Center X, UCLA

Rich learning environments teach towards the understanding of powerful mathematics, develop a community of learners, and view students as sense makers whose ideas are important. How do we prepare schools and teachers to create these rich learning environments for students to flourish as mathematical thinkers? In this talk, I will share ideas and findings around working with students, teachers, administrators, and parents to support high quality instruction that helps students meet the expectations of the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practice and the Next Generation Science Standards.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Rigor and Respect: The Politics of Relationship in Pedagogical Practice
Tuesday, March 24, 2015, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Michael Montoya, PhD, Anthropology + Chicano/Latino Studies, UC Irvine

Long before "flipped" became a thing, educators have been circumventing the schooling paradigm in hopes of transforming the lives of their students. Using interactive examples and philosophical musings on power, politics, and relationships, this workshop explores the ways respect of students and instructors can lead to increased rigor. Along the way, I will share tools, insights, and lessons from my life as a faculty with deep commitment to dialogics and the transformative power of respect.

This presentation is part of Nadia Kim's Faculty Associate project on Achieving a Rigorous Education that Satisfies Teacher and Learner.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Please Take My Survey! A Workshop on How to Get More People to Fill Out Your Survey
Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 12:00pm-1:00pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Christine Chavez, Associate Director of Survey Research

Are you struggling to get more people to fill out your surveys? Many factors can influence a person’s decision to participate in a survey, but with careful consideration you can develop an effective strategy for increasing responses to your survey.
In this workshop, you will learn how key decisions on survey design and administration can impact the number of responses you receive. We will also discuss why the number of responses is important and provide you with practical yet effective techniques for getting more people to participate in your survey.

Please RSVP to surveys@lmu.edu or x86691.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Infusing Privilege and Intersectionality across the Diversity Curriculum
Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 12:15pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Kim Case, PhD, Psychology, University of Houston Clear Lake

Although the scholarship on privilege increased in recent decades since the original McIntosh (1988) paper on white, male, and heterosexual privilege (McIntosh, 2012), privilege studies pedagogy remains neglected. While courses focusing on prejudice currently receive more programmatic support than in the past, classroom discussions of privilege consistently meet student resistance and a variety of additional pedagogical challenges (Case & Cole, 2013; Case & Hemmings, 2005; Lawrence & Bunche, 1996; Tatum, 1994). Given that faculty teaching about privilege often search unsuccessfully for scholarship that informs their instructional approaches and classroom strategies, a coherent model for effective privilege studies pedagogy with an intersectional focus is needed to support faculty allies. This talk will consider ways to minimize student resistance, enhance student engagement, and complicate our current assumptions about the diversity curriculum. The talk will also outline the benefits of using privilege studies pedagogy and intersectional theory for learning about diversity issues and examining the complexity of identity.

Kim A. Case, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Houston-Clear Lake (UHCL) where she directs the Applied Social Issues concentration within the Psychology Master’s program. Her mixed-methods research examines ally behavior when encountering bias and interventions to increase understanding of intersectionality and systemic privilege (e.g., male, heterosexual, White), reduce prejudice, and create inclusive spaces within educational and community settings. Her pedagogical scholarship addresses diversity-course effectiveness, inclusive classroom practices, and teaching for social justice. Her edited book, “Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom” (2013), focuses on pedagogical strategies for teaching about privilege through an intersectional lens. Her upcoming book will emphasize intersectionality pedagogy more specifically: Intersections of Identity: Pedagogy for the Classroom and Social Justice. In 2013, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI APA Division 9) named Dr. Case as the Innovative Teaching Award winner for her student project on public education and intersecting social identities. The project also earned the 2012 Social Psychology Network Action Teaching Award - Honorable Mention. In recognition of her teaching, Dr. Case was also awarded the University of Houston-Clear Lake Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, the Alumni Association’s Outstanding Professor Award, and Minnie Stevens Piper Teaching Award. As both Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), has served as Council member, Executive Council Member, Journal of Social Issues Editorial Board member, Convention Program Chair, Teaching and Mentoring Chair, and Early Career Scholar Chair. She also founded and chaired (2009-2012) the Houston chapter of the national Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN).

This event is part of Adam Fingerhut’s Faculty Associate project on Diversity in the Classroom. See also the afternoon workshop on Privilege and Intersectionality in Your Classroom.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Workshop: Privilege and Intersectionality in Your Classroom
Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 4:15pm-5:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Kim Case, PhD, Psychology, University of Houston Clear Lake

Naming and deconstructing privilege in the classroom often results in student resistance and pedagogical obstacles for instructors (Case & Cole, 2013; Case & Hemmings, 2005; Lawrence & Bunche, 1996; Tatum, 1994; Wise & Case; 2013). This workshop introduces a pedagogical model for facilitating student learning about privilege (Case, 2013). What approaches can we use to address privilege and student resistance as it plays out within the classroom learning community? What happens when we offer students the opportunity to reflect on ways that privilege affects the classroom experience? What happens when we challenge students (and ourselves) to think in more complex and comprehensive ways about how social identities intersect to affect lived experiences? The interactive workshop will explore these questions and various strategies for responding to privilege in the classroom and student resistance. Workshop participants will engage in critical thinking activities, peer discussions, and practice exercises to facilitate learning about privilege and intersectionality in their own classrooms.

Kim A. Case, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Houston-Clear Lake (UHCL) where she directs the Applied Social Issues concentration within the Psychology Master’s program. Her mixed-methods research examines ally behavior when encountering bias and interventions to increase understanding of intersectionality and systemic privilege (e.g., male, heterosexual, White), reduce prejudice, and create inclusive spaces within educational and community settings. Her pedagogical scholarship addresses diversity-course effectiveness, inclusive classroom practices, and teaching for social justice. Her edited book, “Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom” (2013), focuses on pedagogical strategies for teaching about privilege through an intersectional lens. Her upcoming book will emphasize intersectionality pedagogy more specifically: Intersections of Identity: Pedagogy for the Classroom and Social Justice. In 2013, the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI APA Division 9) named Dr. Case as the Innovative Teaching Award winner for her student project on public education and intersecting social identities. The project also earned the 2012 Social Psychology Network Action Teaching Award - Honorable Mention. In recognition of her teaching, Dr. Case was also awarded the University of Houston-Clear Lake Distinguished Faculty Teaching Award, the Alumni Association’s Outstanding Professor Award, and Minnie Stevens Piper Teaching Award. As both Fellow of the American Psychological Association and Fellow of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI), has served as Council member, Executive Council Member, Journal of Social Issues Editorial Board member, Convention Program Chair, Teaching and Mentoring Chair, and Early Career Scholar Chair. She also founded and chaired (2009-2012) the Houston chapter of the national Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN).

This event is part of Adam Fingerhut’s Faculty Associate project on Diversity in the Classroom. See also the convo hour event on Infusing Privilege and Intersectionality across the Diversity Curriculum.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Teaching with Technology Day
Friday, April 10, 2014, from 12:00 PM to 4:30 PM

Event Information

Please join us and be inspired by exploring the technology you can use in your classrooms. Come hear from other LMU faculty about the best practices to integrate technology into our classes and learn what had worked successfully in the past.

Keynote Address: Michelle Miller, Psychological Sciences, Northern Arizona University - "Design for the Mind: What Cognitive Psychology Tells Us About Teaching with Technology"

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Ten Teaching Tips (CREATE-STEM)
Monday, April 13, 2015, 3:00pm-4:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Vince Coletta, PhD, Physics

Professor Coletta will describe ten practical tips that anyone teaching a college level course could find useful. Although they were developed for physics teaching, they are broadly applicable to other fields. Professor Coletta will also describe his research that analyzes students’ learning gains. His students’ gains were described as “spectacular” by Nobel laureate Carl Wieman in a recent paper. More details are provided in Coletta's book Thinking in Physics, recently published by Pearson as part of their Educational Innovation series.
The first thirty instructors who RSVP will receive copies of the book at the talk.

The CREATE-STEM series is organized by Anna Bargagliotti, Ph.D., Mathematics, and Jeff Phillips, Ph.D., Physics. Please contact them directly or via teachers@lmu.edu for details.

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.
Why Teach? A Discussion of a Selection of Essays by Mark Edmundson
Tuesday, April 14, 2015, 3:00pm-4:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Moderated by: Adam Fingerhut, PhD, Psychology, Nadia Kim, PhD, Sociology

In his collection of essays entitled “Why Teach: In Defense of a Real Education,” University of Virginia English Professor Mark Edmundson offers a critique of the modern university and the modern student. Edmundson suggests that in the race to fill classroom seats and dorm beds, control of the university has shifted from the faculty to students and their parents (i.e., the consumers). Edmundson likens the modern university to a “corporate city” rather than a “scholarly enclave.” In this final Faculty Associate event of the year, we invite our faculty peers here at LMU to read a small selection of Edmundson’s essays and to join us in a conversation about the essays and about our vision for what an LMU education can and should be.

This panel discussion is part of Adam Fingerhut’s Faculty Associate project on Diversity in the Classroom.

Event Reading

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

Click HERE to view the event in the LMU Calendar.

Aiding Grading: Team-Based Learning and Peer Evaluation
Monday, April 20, 2015, 12:00pm-1:30pm in UNH 3030

Event Flyer

Presented by: Deborah Rifkin, PhD, Music, Ithaca College

Grading typically involves a hierarchical power arrangement, in which a teacher evaluates a student. It is well established that cooperative, small-group work benefits learning, yet it is not as common for these principles to be applied towards grading and evaluation. Nonetheless, the benefits of team-based learning can also be harnessed for peer evaluation. Collaborative group work can transform an evaluative process into a supportive learning team, which helps raise the achievement of all students, build positive relationships among students, and keep students motivated and energized. In this workshop, I will share examples of effective team-based learning and peer evaluation exercises, in which students undertake multiple roles as Explainer/Demonstrator, Listener, and Evaluator. Through group interaction, students gain insights about different learning styles, develop skills for explaining their ideas in multiple ways, become more mindful listeners, and gain critical evaluative experience. In other words, team-based evaluation allows students to participate in a much fuller learning experience, compared to traditional teacher-student assessment models.
Despite the considerable benefits, there are also challenges to peer evaluation. Students are sometimes reticent to evaluate each other. If students are not prepared properly, peer evaluation can introduce an uncomfortable dynamic among classmates. In addition, students’ self- and peer-reporting of skills acquisition may not be as informed or reliable as a teacher’s evaluation. The workshop explores and addresses these concerns, sharing several strategies to mitigate these potential disadvantages. Some of these strategies include crowd-sourcing confidential feedback, formalizing evaluation procedures, and shifting focus of the evaluation to group interaction skills rather than on individual achievement.

Deborah Rifkin (Associate Professor of Music Theory) is an award-winning music theory and sight-singing teacher at Ithaca College in the Finger Lakes region of New York State. She has taught at some of the top conservatories in the country, including the Eastman School of Music, University of Michigan, Oberlin College Conservatory, and Ithaca College. Her research interests include the music of 20th-century neo-tonal composers, feminist and narrative theories and their contributions to music analysis, and the pedagogy of musical skills. She has published articles in Music Theory Spectrum, Theory and Practice, twentieth-century music, Ex Tempore, and Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy. She earned her Ph.D. in music theory in 2000 from the Eastman School of Music. Deborah started out as a classical violinist, earning prizes and prestigious seats in regional orchestras in her youth and graduate studies. She studied with Janet Baker, Andrew Jennings, and Hamao Fujiwara. Now, she is an avid fiddler, performing and teaching Klezmer, Celtic, and contradance styles each summer at Folk College, in the hills of Pennsylvania. (http://www.simplegiftsmusic.com/folkcollege/index.html)

Articles written by Rifkin that might interest those attending the talk include:
  • “From Distress to Success: Collaborative Learning in Music Theory Assessments,” Engaging Students: Essays in Music Pedagogy, Ed. Bryn Hughes and Kris Shaffer. GitHub Pages, 2013 E-book. http://www.flipcamp.org/engagingstudents/rifkin.html.
  • “A Revised Taxonomy for Music Learning” Journal of Music Theory Pedagogy 25 (2011): 1-35. (Co-authored with Philip Stoecker.)

Please RSVP to teachers@lmu.edu or x85866.

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